Kitsune Noir Mixcast / No.019



This week’s Mixcast is my attempt at a contemporary, indie X-Mas sing-along. The songs on this mix are from all of your favorite indie rock bands, some doing covers, others doing original pieces. It starts out fast and ends slow and smooth. I figure that a lot of you are going to be traveling this weekend and into the next week, so I wanted you to have something to pass the time and get you into the holiday spirit.

I hope you enjoy the mix and hopefully there are some songs on here that are new to you. I think it definitely turned out pretty well and maybe you’ll find some new favorites.

Here’s this week’s tracklist:
Winter Wonderland by Phantom Planet
O Little Town of Bethlehem by Belle & Sebastian
Everything Is Gonna Be Cool This Christmas by Eels
Get Behind Me, Santa! by Sufjan Stevens
Whack Bat Majorette by Alexandre Desplat
It’s Christmas Time by Yo La Tengo
Blue Christmas by Bright Eyes
Cold White Christmas by Casiotone for the Painfully Alone
Wild Animals Approaching The Lovely Country Funeral by Jason Lytle
I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day by Pedro The Lion
O Holy Night by My Morning Jacket
Lo, How A Rose E’er Blooming by Feist

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

December 18, 2009 / By

INVENTORY Magazine







My buddy Ryan over at INVENTORY (formerly h(y)r collective) sent me a copy of his new magazine which is dedicated to “products, craft & culture”, as the front of the magazine says. Over the last couple years there’s been a huge surge in men’s fashion and the idea that durable, well-made clothing is your best bet. INVENTORY covers exactly that trend.

What they’ve managed to do is create a magazine around this new niche while it’s still relatively new and fresh. The style of the magazine is reminiscent of Monocle, in that it’s rather clean and simple with large, bold photos. The editorial is great, featuring stories about Mister Freedom (who I didn’t realize lived in Los Angeles), Duluth Pack (who’s been making men’s bags since 1882) and others. They also offer style tips on how to layer, how to best wear a parka, as well as offering items for sale that they’ve created through exclusive partnerships.

Overall I’d say the magazine is a hit. If you love men’s fashion, especially if your style is more reserved and leans toward classic Americana, you’re going to love this magazine.

You can grab yourself a copy by clicking here.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

December 18, 2009 / By

KN/PC Presents: Inside Look at Garrett Vander Leun

For our final interview from the Kitsune Noir Poster Club we have Garrett Vander Leun, a Los Angeles based illustrator who chose The Road for his poster. Garrett has been drawing since he was a little kid, influenced by his father’s illustrations and comic books growing up. Garrett’s artwork has been featured on music packaging and t-shirts and he is currently working on several series of portraits.

Why did you choose The Road?
The book hit me very hard when I read it, unlike any book has before or since.
I would be remiss if I didn’t say I’ve had some amazing women in my life, and both my mother and grandmother have had a profound influence on me – but there’s something about the relationship between father and son that is almost indescribable, a kind of shorthand where words are often exercised in light of an unspoken understanding. That bond, and that relationship, is so strong in this book and it reminded me very much of the relationship I have with my father. Even without the father thing, the parental instinct in this novel, the need to blindly do anything for your child’s well-being, has never been captured so elegantly and pure. These two characters live in spite of their grim surroundings, live only for each other really, for as the book progresses you’re overwhelmed by hopelessness and despair. At one point, the boy talks with his father:

What would you do if I died?

If you died, I would want to die too.

So you could be with me?

Yes, so I could be with you.

Okay.

That’s it right there, the subtext of the entire book. Two people trying to survive in spite of the ever-changing times, a world where love and kindness is endangered, if not already extinct. Cormac McCarthy is a modern master, and the beauty of his words are very subtle, they’re all just-so deliberate and perfect. No quotation marks, no dialogue modifiers, no excessive flourishes of any kind. It’s like a novelized poem or something. Cormac McCarthy operates on this other level – he reminds me of Terrence Malick, the filmmaker, in a lot of ways.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

December 18, 2009 / By

‘Spacious Thoughts’ by NASA

As I mentioned in my previous post, my favorite video at the Flux event was NASA’s Spacious Thoughts by the duo of Fluorescent Hill. The duo is made up of Montreal based Mark Lomond and Johanne Ste-Marie who make music videos, commercials and short films.

The song has lyrics by both Kool Keith and Tom Waits so the idea of duality must have popped up somewhere. The video features this awesome little character they created, a kind of rain drop guy with a red mouth and a Geordi LaForge visor kinda thing for eyes. He also wears cowboy boots. It’s what they do with the character that is really startling and amazing. I was sitting in the theater and I couldn’t close my mouth, I was amazed. I love how the little guy starts to move and 3D colors start to appear, or he slams his fists into the ground and paint splatters everywhere to increase the emotion.

Whatever you’re doing just stop and watch this, it’ll make your day.
To see more of Fluorescent Hill’s work, click here.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

December 18, 2009 / By

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