Arcade Fire’s ‘We Used To Wait’ Interactive HTML 5 Video







Arcade Fire have yet again kept up with having the most innovative videos out there (suck it OK Go) and there latest creation for their song We Used To Wait is no exception. The video was created by Chris Milk along with the folks over at Google’s Chrome Experiments department and fully utilizes the browser as a portal for the video.

The first thing they ask is for you to “enter the address of the home you grew up in” and then begins to build a custom experience for you. The video starts in one pop-up, then adds another and another, layering the videos in time to the music. Then you start seeing your home in Google Street View, and then you see a satellite shot of your neighborhood… it’s pretty crazy but fun at the same time. I also drew the heart you see above, in case you go looking for it while watching the video and don’t see it.

To try it out for yourself click here. To see some behind the scenes stuff from the Chrom Experiments team click here.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

August 30, 2010 / By

St. Catherine’s Home for Lazy Infants

<a href="http://lazyinfants.bandcamp.com/album/old-ghosts">Tangled Hair by St. Catherine’s Home for Lazy Infants</a>

Over the weekend my buddy Phillip tweeted about this ambient band called St. Catherine’s Home for Lazy Infants, which is in fact an Irishman that goes by the name Alex Synge. It’s perfect working music, as most ambient music is, with lots of acoustic guitar and droning sounds that are like a simplified Explosions in the Sky, but y’know, without the loud parts.

The preview above is for his album Old Ghosts which has 9 songs on it and is only €5, which is roughly $6.43 for us Americans. To sweeten the deal even more you can get it for 20% off by using the coupon code “LAZY”. Take a listen to the tracks above and if you enjoy what you hear be sure to buy it and support this guy.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

August 30, 2010 / By

Rendezvous in Wrongtown

The word “home” is generally associated with ideas of shelter, protection, nurture and comfort, but what happens when you allow a mix of artists, collectives and curators unlimited access to a one million dollar domestic space? What I imagine to be a once homely and cosy area has been deconstructed, dismantled and transformed into a site of the uncanny. For the one day exhibition, Rendezvous in Wrongtown, a Melbourne home was given a massive overhaul to become a multifaceted art installation.With a girl lurking underneath the ripped floorboards courtesy of Urban Village Melbourne (yes, she’s real – not a mannequin!), a walk in wardrobe overflowing with sticky foodstuffs created by the Hotham Street Ladies and a kitchen that has been reconstructed as a sinkhole by Andy Hutson, the exhibition appears to have offered a strangely beautiful experience with dark undercurrents of creepiness – and that is only a small snapshot of the home’s surreal makeover.

This video, courtesy of the ABC’s Art Nation program, provides a view into the exhibition’s homage to the unhomely by uncovering the artistically renovated nooks and crannies of the house. Personally, I think this is one of the most exciting and evocatively creative art projects I have seen in a long time.

Danica

August 30, 2010 / By

Two Seasons Hotel by JDS Architects

Earlier this month, the Two Seasons Hotel in Stavanger, Norway opened to the public.  Designed by Julien DeSmedt Architects, the “6 floor hotel was built on top of a 5 floor existing parking garage giving an extra challenge to the structure. Here, 194 hotel rooms float in a ribbon configuration around an inner courtyard. The hotel rooms have been lifted from the street to secure privacy and a quiet environment for the guests, and to activate the ground floor with a bar, lounge, restaurant and lobby. On top there is a green roof including a roof terrace with a beautiful view over Stavanger city and the harbour.”

Full disclosure: I worked for JDS in 2007, and I am excited whenever I see that the firm has either won a competition or completed a project. Over the past three years, JDS has managed to expand from Copenhagen to Oslo and Brussels in spite of an unfavorable building economy. Although smaller, and less formally flamboyant than the pending Holmenkollen Ski Jump, projects like the Two Seasons seem reassuring in an economy that makes projects scarce. But the Ski Jump does have  something the Two Seasons doesn’t: a flash game where you can virtually jump.

Alex

Alex Dent

August 30, 2010 / By

Space Suit of the Week

‘Sup nerds? Check your adult diapers, because this week we’re having a Space Suit underpants party. No, we won’t be moonwalkin’ in our skivvies, but we’ll take a look at how fancy long underwear keeps Spacefolk from suffering thermal extremes that would otherwise freeze and scorch them. Earlier, I commented that “the technical requirements of space suits are tremendous. In the vacuum of space, these suits recreate the protection that our entire biosphere offers, only these suits compress that protection” to about the thickness of a halloween costume. Maintaining a safe body temperature is one of the technical requirements any viable space suit must satisfy.

The average temperature in space is about three degrees above absolute zero, but when you get close to cosmic hairdryers, like our sun, it can get balmy.  How balmy? Well, take what the weather is like on earth’s moon: -240 degrees in the shade and 230 degrees in the sun. Half of your flesh is toasty while the other half is frigid. (This ignores what would happen to your body as a result of the lack of pressure. hint: water on your tongue and eyeballs boils).

A sight for sore eyes is the Liquid Cooling Garment, or LCG, which circulates water around small polyvinyl chloride tubes embedded in long, spandex underwear to conduct heat away from the astronaut’s body.  See them?  (Those aren’t pee tubes! In fact, astronauts wear superabsorbant diapers on space walks, although that hasn’t always been the case.) The water is re-cooled via a heat pump and re-circulated to keep the astronaut’s body temperature from rising as body heat accumulates inside the space suit.

That’s why you can’t really dress like an astronaut for halloween without a diaper.

I guess the hood is optional.

Alex

Alex Dent

August 27, 2010 / By

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