FOTB 2010 Titles by Nando Costa

I’m not exactly sure what goes on durring a flash conference, but the title sequence for this year’s Flash on the Beach (FOTB) is attractive enough to stand on its own. The sequence is the work of Nando Costa, a Brazillian-born Graphic Artist living and working in Portland. But what do magnets have to do with a flash conference? Costa explains: “The choice of materials was driven by the desire to graphically represent the concepts of attraction and repulsion. The idea that graphic artists of all sorts attend events such as FOTB because they are inspired and therefore attracted to each other’s work, while at the same time often competing in the same fields as peers and therefore representing repulsion.”

Alex.

Alex Dent

September 30, 2010 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Mr. Kiji

Mr. Kiji

I know it’s been a while since I’ve posted a desktop wallpaper and I’m honestly sorry about that. To be honest the idea has become a bit stale to me, though I know a lot of you really love seeing something new every week. Well I’m happy to say that in the coming weeks I’ve got a new approach to the wallpapers which I personally find interesting and I hope you’ll like. Until then, I’ve got a few wallpapers that I’ll start giving away in the interim to tide you over, sound good?

This week’s wallpaper is from a guy named Mr. Kiji, whom you might remember from this post several months back. We actually started talking because of Twitter and I asked him if he’d be down to make a wallpaper and he graciously obliged. Halloween is a month and a day away so I thought this would be perfect for those of you looking to get a little spooky early.

I’m pretty sure black foxes hang out in graveyards a lot just like this guy above. Does anyone else think this wallpaper kinda’ looks like camo as well? Or is just me?

Bobby

P.S. I’ll be discontinuing the PSP size from now on and replacing it with the mega-sized 2650 x1440, something a lot of you have been asking for. In addition, the iPhone wallpaper is now retina display compatible for your iPhone 4, but still works fine on all other models as well.

Bobby Solomon

September 30, 2010 / By

‘To Slow Down The Time: Stories’

One of my very talented friends Matt Allard, along with co-collaborator and illustrator Ian Dingman, has released a new book called To Slow Down The Time: Stories. The book takes a really interesting, somewhat backwards approach. Instead of Matt writing the stories and Ian creating illustrations, Matt was actually inspired by Ian’s art and created stories around his pieces. It makes for a great and interesting read, seeing how Matt interprets Ian’s images and crafts these great, short stories. Ian’s drawings are also quite charming and are filled with detail and character, as evidenced above.

It’s also worth mentioning that Matt and Ian published the book themselves which is an endeavor all in it’s own. I’ve already poured over my copy and it’s great to see them follow through with this passion project.

You can preview the book by clicking here or grab yourself a copy for $20 by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

September 30, 2010 / By

Colin Greenwood Talks About Releasing A Record in 2010

Colin Greenwood, bassist of Radiohead, recently wrote a short piece for Index on Censorship, a British organization centered around the freedom of expression. In it he writes about his experience with releasing Radiohead’s last album, which you’ll remember as the first band ever to introduce the pay what you want scheme for their music. It certainly made a lot of headlines, and in their own words, was quite empowering:

Three years later, we have just finished another group of songs, and have begun to wonder about how to release them in a digital landscape that has changed again. It seems to have become harder to own music in the traditional way, on a physical object like a CD, and instead music appears the poor cousin of software, streamed or locked into a portable device like a phone or iPod. I buy hardly any CDs now and get my music from many different sources: Spotify, iTunes, blog playlists, podcasts, online streaming – reviewing this makes me realise that my appetite for music now is just as strong as when I was 13, and how dependent I am upon digital delivery. At the same time, I find a lot of the technology very frustrating and counter-intuitive. I spend a lot of time using music production software, but iTunes feels clunky. I wish it was as simple and elegant as Apple’s hardware. I understand that we have become our own broadcasters and distributors, but I miss the editorialisation of music, the curatorial influences of people like John Peel or a good record label. I liked being on a record label that had us on it, along with Blur, the Beastie Boys and the Beatles.

All that being said, they’re still unsure how the next album will be released:

We have yet to decide how to release our next record, but I hope these partial impressions will help give some idea of the conversations we’ve been having. Traditional marketplaces and media are feeling stale – supermarkets account for around 70 per cent of CDs sold in the UK, the charts are dominated by TV talent-show acts – and we are trying to find ways to put out our music that feel as good as the music itself. The ability to have a say in its release, through the new technologies, is the most empowering thing of all.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

September 29, 2010 / By

Sunset in Los Angeles


This evening as I was biking home from work at Myspace it started to lightly rain, which was actually nice because it’s been so hot lately. As I stopped at my apartment I noticed there was a giant rainbow above, as you can see in the photo at top. From my kitchen window I can see the sun setting, so I snapped a photo of that as well. Random beauty I thought I’d share.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

September 29, 2010 / By

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