Hella Jongerius’s Special Collectors Artwork: 300 Unique Vases





Dutch designer Hella Jongerius is yet again working with Royal Tichelaar Makkum, one of the oldest factories in the Netherlands, to create a special collection of 300 unique vases. Hella’s work traditionally eschews the polish and gloss that you normally associate with items opting for a more hand hewn, unfinished look. This is true for her 300 unique vases as well, which still have the seam of the mold they were poured from which is usually sanded down. After that it’s given a three step glazing process which gives them a beautiful range of colors.

I love how these turned out and I think it’s interesting that’s it’s an exploration of craft. It’s great how she chose not to hide the obvious production methods, that in her opinion it gives the vases character. I also think it’s neat how all the vases together look like a sort of giant color wheel. It would be cool to see all of them in a room together in an exhibit, to see how they look in relation to each other.

Found through The Scout

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

December 28, 2010 / By

Bildbauten by Philipp Schaerer

Although these images are the work of photographer Philipp Schaerer, none of them are actual photographs. Instead, these are renderings of fictional architecture to point out how very tricky photography can really be.  In Philipp’s own words “[The series] deals with the effect and the claim to credibility of images of architecture that appear to be photographs. It further questions the medium ‘photograph’ as a documentary piece of evidence depicting reality.” Remind anyone else of Filip Dujardin?

But I wish these image were of something real because they look amazing: confinement and calm instead of being frantic or taken at overly-dramatic angles. Philipp is quite the rendering champ, having created numerous renderings for Herzog & DeMeuron.

Alex

Alex Dent

December 28, 2010 / By

Greedy Hen

Katherine Brickman and Kate Mitchell, who are known collectively as Greedy Hen, can only be described as multi-disciplinary wonders who infuse everything they do with a touch of magic and eccentric delight. Aiming to create imagery that alludes to “playful black humour, unwritten fables, or subtle off-kilter sinister elements lurking amongst a kinder-esq beauty”, Brickman and Mitchell work on their own art pieces, as well as produce album covers, posters and music videos for a variety of musicians. Their signature eclectic style transcends mediums and incorporates hand-drawn elements, photography and collage with a mix of found and new images. The results are a little bit trippy and a smidgen bizarre, but oh so undeniably good.

Obviously not keen to rest on their laurels, Greedy Hen have their own fashion label in the works. I, for one, cannot wait to see what they come up with.

Danica

December 28, 2010 / By

‘Skate Fails’, A Collaboration Between Alex Trochut and Apparatu









Deconstructing existing concepts and making something new from them can sometimes be exciting, and sometimes bad. For example, my boyfriend Kyle ordered a Chicken Pot Pie at a restaurant recently and ended up with it being deconstructed, a stack of chicken and pastry in a moat of pureed peas. This collaboration between illustrator Alex Trochut and Apparatu, Spanish artist Xavier Manosa Ciria? Definitely not a moat of pureed peas. Together they’ve taken the idea of skateboards and melted, distorted and altogether destroyed the concept, creating the pieces you see above, calling it Skate Fails.

These ceramic creations are so rad looking, the top one totally reminds me of the T-1000 in skateboard form. I love that they made the decision to use real trucks, though I believe the wheels are also ceramic. I feel like this either has been done before or should have been done like, 20 years ago. I would kill to hang that gold one on my wall.

Found Through Design Boom

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

December 27, 2010 / By

Master Plan for Åndalsnes by JÄGNEFÄLT MILTON

Even though Swedish architecture firm Jågnefålt Milton didn’t win first place in the competition to design a master plan for the Norwegian city of Åndalsnes, their proposal was innovative enough to snag third. What Jågnefålt Milton proposed is to prefabricate chunks of buildings and roll them through the city on rail tracks, focusing the development of the town in concentrated ribbons of existing (and some new) infrastructure. In the winter, just roll your house somewhere sunny and in the summer, roll your house somewhere breezy. It’s radically different from the the other proposals and the renderings are straightforward, but at the same time it’s curious and interesting to see small pieces of architecture just hanging out along the tracks.

Alex

Alex Dent

December 27, 2010 / By

Agenda 2011 by Julie Joliat

Rather than writing a miniature essay on why making plans for New Year’s Eve usually makes me break into a cold sweat, I thought it far more in keeping with recent festivities to focus on the positive side. And, for me, there is nothing more wonderful than opening a brand new diary. The new diary scent, clean and crisp pages and the promise of a fresh start are the perfect antidote to that seedy New Year’s day feeling.

Of course, the diary in question has to possess a certain sense of style and I have yet to come across one as impressive as Agenda 2011 by Swiss graphic designer Julie Joliat. Beautifully designed in monochrome with a bright splash of yellow, Joliat’s agenda ticks all the right boxes in terms of aesthetics; however, it is the concept that is really exciting. Featuring more than 50 “connect-the-dots” puzzles, the diary has a brilliant interactive element. But these are not the “connect-the-dot” pictures of your youth, as each puzzle reveals a significant work of art from an influential artist. Jeffs Koons, Andy Warhol and Vincent Van Gogh all get a look-in, making Agenda 2011 highly appropriate for design-conscious folk and art history nerds alike.

Agenda 2011 is currently sold out; however, a new print is planned for January. Keep updated here.

Danica

December 27, 2010 / By

‘The Fall’ by Gorillaz

Isn’t this nice! As a special treat to Gorillaz fans Damon Albarn has shared a whole new album of tracks over on their website for Christmas. Entitled The Fall, this 15 track album was recorded while Albarn toured the US with the band during the Summer. For me, the most interesting thing about this release is that it was all recorded using an iPad, something which Damon has said he “fell in love as soon as he got it.”

For what it is, The Fall really is a great album and it’s probably better compared with Albarn’s 2003 solo album Democrazy then to any of the band’s other releases. This is an album that is filled with plenty of great ideas and engaging instrumentals; it’s an eclectic mix of synths and sounds and works perfectly, not just as a diary of the bands 32 day tour across the states, but as a testment to what can be achieved in a short space of time when you combine great talent and great technology. Head over to Gorillaz.com to check out the album, where it’s available to stream or can be downloaded for members of the fan club.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

December 27, 2010 / By

Extended Trailer for ‘Paths of Hate’

Polish director Damian Nenow is working on his next feature film titled Paths of Hate, which appears to be about war and dog fighting, possibly during World War 1 or 2. This one minute trailer is quite promising, the CGI images remind of the artwork of Akira creator Katsuhiro Otomo or the art of Travis Charest. The dogfight in the trailer is pretty amazing, I was watching it full screen on my laptop and the details are really impressive, like the brush strokes that make up the clouds or the ribbons of bullets flying through the air. Really looking forward to seeing this.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

December 23, 2010 / By

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