Ei Kaneko

Ei Kaneko

Ei Kaneko

Ei Kaneko

Click to enlarge

Ei Kaneko is a Tokyo based artist who creates moody and disorienting portraits with graphite. It’s interesting how he uses fragments of images to create a new meaning. What that new meaning may be I’m not sure, but I love that piece at top which juxtaposes a detailed drawing of a skull with the frail figure of an androgynous person. I found an interesting article over on Art is Alive where he describes his work as “a void identity.” If these pieces interest you be sure to click here to read it. Also be sure to click the images to see them larger and to see more of the details.

Found through YMFY

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 26, 2011 / By

Dana Tanamichi

Dana Tanamachi

Dana Tanamachi

Dana Tanamachi

Chalk is an interesting medium. The first word that pops into my head is “temporary.” And when I think of chalk I imagine kids splayed out on the sidewalk on a warm summer day, their dreams and imaginations spilling out in a chalky mess. But what happens when you take such a simple tool and bring a little craft to it? You’d get something like the work of Dana Tanamichi. Dana does these large scale typography drawings that are simply stunning, harkening back to a time of sign painters creating advertisements on the sides of buildings. Of course, she works for Louise Fili, which makes total sense when you look at what she does because she does it so well.

Found through 100 Layer Cake

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 25, 2011 / By

Junya Watanabe Does Americana Better Than Americans

Junya Watanabe Fall 2011

Junya Watanabe Fall 2011

Junya Watanabe Fall 2011

Over the weekend I was catching up GQ’s coverage of the men’s fashion shows from Milan, seeing what sort of weirdness the big designers were coming up with. There’s a lot of interesting ideas out there but in my opinion Junya Watanabe, the ex-Comme Des Garçons designer, was doing some of the most interesting and wearable pieces that I saw.

It’s no secret that the Japanese have a soft spot for Americana when it comes to clothing, but it seems like Junya has been able to take that style and evolve it from it’s current place. For example, the larger photos show jackets that are inspired by ski sweaters, ornate patterns and bright colors and all. It’s such a clever idea that seems so simple and smart. These heavy patterns and plaids are used all throughout the collection, but in new ways with refined touches.

I wasn’t sure if it was just me, that I was just excited about the collection because it reflects a progression of how I kind of dress. But then I saw The Sartorialist was in the front row of the show snapping photos and I realized I wasn’t crazy. His photos are the larger ones above, the smaller come from GQ. Seeing his photo gave such a human and personal look to the clothes, he did a great job of capturing the personalities of the models, thus making the clothes look even better. Or at least, that’s how I see it.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 25, 2011 / By

Hayato Wakabayashi

hayato 1

hayato 2

hayato 3

When I first viewed the work of Japanese photographer Hayato Wakabayashi I said very little, but I am pretty sure that my jaw dropped significantly. His most recent photographs capture natural phenomena in the process of catastrophe and destruction and yet Wakabayashi manages to infuse each shot with astonishing beauty. Having previously filled his compositions with imagery of flowers and plants – and therefore dealing with subjects that are intrinsically associated with aestheticised prettiness – Wakabayashi’s new work draws attention to finding visual splendour in the unexpected.

Wakabayashi also has a lovely photolog that you can check out here.

Danica

January 25, 2011 / By

An Idea Space To Match Your Highlighted Notes

fluorescent interior

These are photos of the Bangkok University Creative Center designed by SuperMachine Studios. The most dominate feature of the 600 square meters is the bold use of color… and even bold doesn’t quite portray the magnitude of color cajones it must have taken to realize this space. From the giant array of rotating pixels, to the highlighter-colored “internet center” to the day-lit spaces that line the periphery, this project creates a variety of workspaces for students to be creative. And the room is no blank slate, but another source of inspiration for students who go there.

The variety of spaces in the Creative Center seem to mirror the head spaces you occupy when you’re trying to solve a creative problem. There are more somber and serious spaces like the ones that line the exterior where you get stuff done, and spaces more playful, like the roving internet center where you sometimes get things done.  And there’s plenty of space for distraction: not by cat videos, but by a wall of thousands of color-changing pixels. The wall could even be used to make a cat video, but someone would have to have the patience and determination to re-arrange each pixel by hand for every frame of the video. Or just stare around the room, thinking about the polychromatic hues and looking for your favorite one.

Alex

Alex Dent

January 25, 2011 / By

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