‘Young Dreams’ by Young Dreams; Directed by Kristoffer Borgli

Young Dreams; Directed by Kristoffer Borgli

Young Dreams; Directed by Kristoffer Borgli

My buddy Kristoffer Borgli sent me this new video he shot for the band Young Dreams, which consists of some members from one of my favorite bands, Casiokids. Yet again Kristoffer has taken his weird yet beautiful style of directing and has created this wonderful video for the song, Young Dreams. In his usual style of directing he uses young people in his video, this time around they get the run of a beautiful, modern house and it’s all beautifully shot. What does mean? I dunno. But it compliments the song really well and is filled with gorgeous footage. Sit back and enjoy>

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

March 31, 2011 / By

Blinky

Blinky

Blinky

Contemporary sci-fi loves to villainize robots. Whether they be Terminators or The Matrix, humans love to make our silicon and titanium friends into monsters… because it’s fun. This short film written, directed and edited by Ruairi Robinson called Blinky is such an example. The short stars Max Records, who you would know from Where The Wild Things Are, as a young boy in a household with arguing parents. To relieve the tension he asks for a robot for Christmas to be his friend and keep him company. But the boy starts questioning the robot and realizes that the robot’s attention isn’t a suitable replacement for a humans emotions…

… and then shit gets scary.

The video is a bit long winded but it’s absolutely worth your time. Be sure to watch it to the very, very end or you’re going to miss out. It’s a little predictable but really well done.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

March 31, 2011 / By

Pussy People by Ikea

Ikea, Pussy People

Ikea, Pussy People

Ikea, Pussy People

Remember that really beautiful IKEA advertisement from last year, where the cats run around and play and sleep on things, just to remind us that we are “happy inside” (with IKEA furniture)? Well, it seems that that along with the behind the scenes video–Herding Cats–another video was released as part of the IKEA Cats promotion: Pussy People.

Pussy People isn’t about an IKEA store nor is it really an advertisement for a product itself. Instead, the video delves into the lives of the people who own the cats in the Happy Inside advertisement. We meet several cat loving people, namely Dorothy Woodhouse (a cat show president), Beryl Reeves (a cat sculptor), and–my favorite, champagne swigging mum–Ros Hamilton (a cat lover). We learn about their love for cats and what being a cat owner means to them. We also learn something very important: what the term “pussy people” means, which is actually a very existential look into what it means to call something a “person.”

This video is a hoot and such a beautiful, well shot, funny, bite-sized documentary to brighten up your day and make you rethink cats. It takes a lot to make a commercial for a company that isn’t about any of their products work, but Pussy People definitely does a lot of good for IKEA. And, for cats.

KYLE

KYLE FITZPATRICK

March 31, 2011 / By

The Responsive Eye

This is a video about The Responsive Eye exhibition at MoMA from 1965. I found it wandering around on Vimeo and it features the curator of the exhibition William Seitz, along with a psychologist to explain the science, some stylish patrons, and even Philip Johnson walking around the exhibition and sharing thoughts. There are other creative types in the video: Josef Albers, Mon Levinson, Larry Aldrich, etc. If you like old documentaries, art history or just op art, it’s worth a watch.

Alex

Alex Dent

March 31, 2011 / By

Universal Everything Animates The 5 Codes of Coco Chanel

Universal Everything's Animations for Chanel

Universal Everything's Animations for Chanel

I figured since we heard from Tom Ford and his five lessons for a man it’s only fitting that we feature the 5 codes of Coco Chanel; Black & White / Pearls / Diamond Padding / Camellia / Art Deco. This was the inspiration used by Universal Everything for a series of installation videos for Chanel in Hong Kong, Tokyo and Shanghai. As you can see in the video above it really makes the facade and inner spaces come to life. The way they visualized Camelia, which you can see in the image above, is my personal favorite, though the preview image on the video there is really nice as well. Be sure to watch the video below as well, I’d suggest blowing it up full screen, to get a better view of the animations.

Found through Monomalist

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

March 31, 2011 / By

Five Lessons From Tom Ford (And How They Apply To The Web)

Five Lessons from Tom Ford

Another Magazine has a big interview with Tom Ford for their Spring/Summer issue, and so they’ve posted online Tom Ford’s five easy lessons in how to be a modern gentleman. While I really like his list and I think it’s something every guy should take to heart. But what I thought was interesting is that the same ideas, save for the last one, is totally applicable to the web.

Nowadays everyone has a web presence, and how you choose to represent yourself is becoming increasingly important. You may have heard of that girl from UCLA who made that crazy video about how annoyed she was by “Asians” and posted it to YouTube… yeah, she’s never going to be able to live that down and she should probably change her name. She’s obviously an extreme example, but it goes to show just how your online self can effect the real world. Take a look at Tom’s list and if you don’t do the things listed, you might want to reconsider things.

1. You should put on the best version of yourself when you go out in the world because that is a show of respect to the other people around you.

2. A gentleman today has to work. People who do not work are so boring and are usually bored. You have to be passionate, you have to be engaged and you have to be contributing to the world.

3. Manners are very important and actually knowing when things are appropriate. I always open doors for women, I carry their coat, I make sure that they’re walking on the inside of the street. Stand up when people arrive at and leave the dinner table.

4. Don’t be pretentious or racist or sexist or judge people by their background.

5. A man should never wear shorts in the city. Flip-flops and shorts in the city are never appropriate. Shorts should only be worn on the tennis court or on the beach.

And yes dudes, the part about the flip flops is true, only wear them to the beach. Shorts on the other hand should be totally fine, especially if you’re young and happen to live in California (sorry, Tom).

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

March 31, 2011 / By

Stacking for XBox 360 and Playstation 3

Stacking Video Game for XBox and Playstation

Stacking Video Game for XBox and Playstation

Stacking Video Game for XBox and Playstation

Stacking is a funny little game released this past February for XBox and Playstation’s live networks. I’ve delayed on posting it for the past month or so, as I played the game through and really examined it for gameplay and aesthetics. I was pleasantly surprised by all aspects of the game: it’s simple, it’s fun, and it’s more complex than you would imagine.

The game has two things going for it: the story and the style. The story follows the Blackmore family, a working class family during the Industrial Revolution. The family (namely, the children) are kidnapped and enslaved to work in coal mines by the evil Baron, who is propagating a child labor scheme. However, little Charlie Blackmore–the smallest of the Blackmores–was untouched by the Baron due to his small size. Now, Charlie has to fight for his family!!

Good, right? I mean, it’s okay. The glory of the story is that it lends itself perfectly to the style of gameplay, which is what makes Stacking so genius: every character is a Matryoshka (“Russian Nesting”) doll! Charlie, the smallest nesting doll, has to maneuver his way into bigger dolls to become the person and take on their talents, which are used to dupe others, open doors (literally and figuratively), and solve challenges. Each person (or doll?) has a unique talent, be it the ability to seduce men, punch people in the face, blast their obscene flatulence, or even cry loudly. All of these characters are used at one point or another to advance the game and, when you defeat the game, can be used to annoy the other characters (via the dolls “Hi-Jinks.” a character’s traits being used to engage or enrage other characters).

Aesthetically, Double Fine–the production company behind the game–paid great attention to paint the world and story inside of a “silent movie” type of world. All of the story telling moments are done through old film reels with piano playing. All dialogue is written on cards, a la silent film. The only problem with this great motif is that it can sometimes take FOREVERRRRR to get through a storytelling moment. Regardless, it is a great device.

Furthermore, Double Fine did a great job of creating the world the characters live in. Because nesting dolls are only–I don’t know–five inches tall at their biggest, the world around them is composed out of repurposing common household items into proportional environmental decor. An example: a chandelier in the game is made of out illuminated pasta noodles. Little items like this proliferate the game, catching your eye whenever you enter a new room.

Stacking is a fun game that I definitely implore you to check out if you have an XBox or Playstation. It’s fun, it’s quirky, and it’s definitely one of the best games–if not the best–of the first quarter of 2K11.

KYLE

KYLE FITZPATRICK

March 30, 2011 / By

Richard Sanderson

Richard Sanderson

Richard Sanderson

Richard Sanderson

A few weeks ago London-based illustrator and printmaker Richard Sanderson updated his website, adding some new work and a whole new shine to his portfolio. Richard had recently taken a break from freelance work, but he’s now “returned to the fold with renewed enthusiasm and a fresh perspective on all things illustrative” (as his bio puts it). This is great news as Richard is one of my favorite illustrator working today; I’m particularly fond of his gentle use of color and his ability to make illustrations that look both loose yet restrained. Take a look at his portfolio here or grab yourself a print at his shop – I’ve been particularly eyeing his Toybox print, a must for all Star Wars fans!

Philip

Philip Kennedy

March 30, 2011 / By

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