McBess x Mediatemple Design Contest, Judged by The Fox Is Black

McBess x Mediatemple Design Remix Contest

I’ve been using Mediatemple for my hosting now for, well, I don’t know how long. But they’re a rad bunch of people and they’re definitely doing some fun stuff. For example, they’ve teamed up with the mega-talented McBess to create a special edition shirt for their support team, known as the 140 Team (no idea what that means, it’s nerd speak). But they want to get you readers in on this, so they’ve organized a contest in which you remix some of McBess’ graphics and make something rad of your own. The prize? Well, there’s quite a lot, depending upon who picks your work:

1) McBess’ Choice: Photoshop or Illustrator CS5, Unique McBess Print & Media Booklet, a one-time $200 (mt) hosting credit, (mt) 140 shirt & swag

2) The Fox Is Black Choice: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX78 12.1 MP Digital Camera (Leica 24-120mm Zoom Lens equiv.), Unique McBess Print & Media Booklet, a one-time $200 (mt) hosting credit, (mt) 140 shirt & swag

3) (mt)’s Choice: Wacom Intuos4 Medium Tablet, Unique McBess Print & Media Booklet, a one-time $200 (mt) hosting credit, (mt) 140 shirt & swag

4) People’s Choice: iPad 2 16GB, McBess Media Booklet, (mt) 140 shirt & swag

McBess Element Pack

So here’s what you do. Download the McBess Element pack in either EPS or JPG format. Here’s the important part, you have to use at least 3 of the 10 McBess files, as well as 1 (mt) Media Temple logo from the provided pack. Then use the images you’ve chosen as a starting point to create your own brilliant piece of art. Once you’re done, submit it to the Make Your Best McBess! Flickr submission group and you’re good to go!

You have until May 8th so you’d better get cracking!

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 28, 2011 / By

Erwin Hauer’s Concrete Screens

Erwin Hauer Concrete Screens

Erwin Hauer Concrete Screens

Some of the most exquisite and modern uses of concrete have come from the Studio of Erwin Hauer. Hauer, an Austrian-born sculptor, began to install these light-diffusing screens in the 50′s, making the concrete forms by hand. His goal was, and is, to create “Continuity and potential infinity.” Today, his studio uses digitally-intensive processes that were adopted after a former student joined the studio. I agree with  Anne-Mette Manelius (who blogs about concrete) that Hauers work has seen a revitalization of interest (as his firm shifts toward computer development). The newer screens use concrete less, but this has enabled a thinness and plasticity that may be better suited for his work. Above and below are photos from a tour of his studio from 2007 taken by Ajmal Aqtash, a founding partner of form-ula.

Alex

Alex Dent

April 27, 2011 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Christopher Jaurique

Christopher Jaurique

As a part of the talk I gave yesterday at Otis College of Art & Design, we also had a little competition. It was simple, students were asked to create a desktop wallpaper, the best entry would be featured on the site. I received some pretty cool designs, but the one I thought was best was this entry by Christopher Jaurique. Christopher is a senior at Otis right now, studying Communication Arts and Advertising, though he admits that he loves making films. He’s currently working on his senior thesis project, in which he’s “building a room of mirrors and lcd screens in an attempt to disorient the viewer”… sounds pretty cool to me.

I loved this image because I thought it was a perfect computer wallpaper. It’s got interesting colors and minor details, and yet it’s vague enough that it’s not going to distract you, either. That subtle mixture of just enough is hard to do, but I think Christopher nailed it. Definitely check out the rest of his work in his portfolio, and better yet, hire him to make amazing films for you.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 27, 2011 / By

Sugamo Shinkin Bank by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design

Sugamo Shinkin Bank by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design

Sugamo Shinkin Bank by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design

Sugamo Shinkin Bank by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design

Sugamo Shinkin Bank by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design

I think I tend to skew minimal concerning architecture, but I love these slices of color on the Sugamo Shinkin Bank by Emmanuelle Moureaux Architecture + Design. What could have been a visually appealing but color neutral building they’ve given a burst of color to the eaves of these giant slabs that adorn the facade of the bank. Inside, the same aesthetic is carried over, with bright, pops of color residing around the space in the form of chairs and bright graphics adorning the ceilings and walls. I’m also in love with those giant, glass tubes that literally cuts through the space to allow for natural light to pour through. I’m a huge fan of natural light and I think this is a genius way of making the space not only feel larger but more welcoming, as well.

It’s also interesting to note that this is the third branch they’ve designed. This is the Shimura branch, but they’ve also done the Tokiwadai branch as well as the branch in Niiza. All of the branches feature a similar aesthetic, that of simplicity with pops of color.

Found through designboom

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 27, 2011 / By

Banksy at ‘Art In The Streets’

Banksy at 'Art In The Streets'

Banksy at 'Art In The Streets'

Banksy at 'Art In The Streets'

Banksy Press Release from 'Art In The Streets'

Click images to enlarge

One of the biggest surprises of Art In The Streets was the inclusion of Banksy, who I don’t think was mentioned on any of the publicity materials. Or maybe I just had no idea he was going to be there, either way, I was pleasantly surprised to see his work. It ended up being a mix of both older and newer work, as well as several old stencils that are almost iconic with the idea of Banksy, much like the ‘Andre the Giant Has A Posse’ sticker and Shepard Fairey. Randomly, he also included the piece of paper above, which was sitting on the giant, bloody flattening machine, which gives some important information about his part of the show.

First is the fact that his part is an ongoing project, and will shift and change as the exhibit goes on… or he may have just been late. It also describes that the giant cathedral tag window was done in collaboration with the City of Angels school, showcasing the work of a ton of kids. It also notes that the taxidermy dog was not killed by Banksy, it was found in a freezer, so don’t get all crazy about that part. Overall I thought his section was really great, I definitely spent a little while looking at his pieces and smiling. Maybe Banksy isn’t getting boring…?

Click the link below to see the rest of the photos.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 27, 2011 / By

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