The Street Market at ‘Art In The Streets’ at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Steven Powers at The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Click images to enlarge

I have so many photos from Art In The Streets that I’m still trying to get all the photos edited and put together, it’s quite a process. These images are of the Street Market, a recreation of an exhibit that was originally at Deitch Gallery back in 2000. I was only 18 when the gallery originally was created so it was an amazing treat to get to walk through this amazing exhibit with an exhibit. It’s made up of pieces from Steven Powers (who you can see with Kyle in the photo above), who also goes by ESPO, Todd James, who’s also know as REAS, and one of my all-time favorites Barry McGee, whom you might know as Twist. These guys have created an entire city block covered in art.

This was one of the first things that I experienced when I got into the space, and it was overwhelming in the best way possible. There’s just so much to process that you’re walking through with your mouth open, or that was my reaction, at least. I just can’t believe they were able to reconstruct such an immense work. It’s not identical by any means, but it’s still the same in spirit and that’s what’s important.

I’ve got 58 photos under the cut, all of which you can see larger versions of. I encourage and implore you to take the time and look at all the insane details that went into this space. I hope you enjoy the photos.

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Bobby Solomon

April 25, 2011 / By

Doing It For The Kids

Doing It For The Kids, The Fox Is Black

A week ago from today, Bobby and I went to see Frank Chimero speak at UCLA. He spoke about his body of work, his inspiration, his upcoming projects, and what design really means. He emphasized that design is not a problem that needed to be “solved,” but–instead–it needed many responses. He gave a few examples, relating design to a few things to make his point, showing that math yields one, distinct, there-can-only-be-one answer while art yields many responses. Thus is the reason why we have so many different types of chairs.

While speaking with Frank afterwards, catching a drink at a local spot not far from UCLA, I listened to him and Bobby speaking about speaking. Bobby related his experiences at Creative Mornings and GOOD Magazine while Frank mentioned his recent foray into speaking in various cities, at various venues. One thing that they both agreed upon was that they were “doing this for the kids,” an item that could not be overlooked in light of a talk to UCLA students. It also hit a point that me and you and anyone with a computer has heard echoed around the Internet lately.

From the nearly corporate “It’s okay to be gay!” videos of the It Gets Better project to Zach Anner’s vindication over Oprah, a lot of work is being done around educating the young and giving everyone a voice. Because of the shrinking world by the Internet and kids as young as four or five walking around with iPods in their pockets, we are now able to connect to these impressionable and voiceless people on and offline.

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KYLE FITZPATRICK

April 25, 2011 / By

‘Police And Thieves’ by Get Back Guinozzi!

GET BACK GUINOZZI!

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Roughly about a year and a half ago I caught Get Back Guinozzi! play a support slot at a gig in Dublin and I quickly fell in love with them. I’m a sucker for Gallic pop bands and must confess that any half-decent melody that’s wrapped around some French vocals will nearly always have me exposing my inner francophilia. The band is the brainchild of two French friends who, a few years ago, began exchanging song ideas back and forth between London and Toulon.

Together they’ve written a collection of infectiously poppy tracks that are filled with a quirky 60’s vibe and a giddy sense of summertime. To get a better picture of their sound try and imagine what the Tom Tom Club or some early Slits records might sound like if they were mixed with some lo-fi tropical funk; I think it’s fair to say that that’s a pretty fun combination. Last year they released their debut album Carpet Madness on FatCat Records which is well worth tracking down. The album features an excellent cover of the Junior Murvin track Police and Thieves which I’ve shared with you above. Check it out!

Philip

Editor’s Note: Randomly enough, Erik over at Friends of Type made a Police & Thieves illustration and it was too good not to throw onto this post. Clearly, great minds think alike, even if one of those minds is in Ireland and the other San Francisco. Great work on this Erik, especially loving the E lighting S’s cigar.

Erik Marinovich from Friends of Type's Police & Thieves Illustration

Philip Kennedy

April 25, 2011 / By

The Fox Is Black Is Heading To Seattle

Seattle, Washington

Photo borrowed from Vintage Seattle

This Wednesday Kyle and I will be travelling up to Seattle for some sightseeing and family visiting. Neither of us have been to Seattle before, so we’re looking for some great tips on where to shop, eat, get drinks and not-to-miss places to see. We’re staying at the Ace Hotel, so things near our hotel would obviously be better and easier for us. We’ve already discussed the Seattle Public Library, the Space Needle and Pike Place Fish Market for the tourist-y part, but we’d love some unique and fun places to visit as well.

All tips are totally appreciated, please leave them in the comments of this post.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 25, 2011 / By

Taisuke Koyama’s ‘Melting Rainbows’

Taisuke Koyama's Melting Rainbows

Taisuke Koyama's Melting Rainbows

Click images to enlarge

I’m in love with these crazy rainbow images by Taisuke Koyama, a Japanese artist doing some really interesting work. His series Melting Rainbows was created almost by accident:

From the last series “Rainbow Form” in 2009, which was the closed-up pictures of advertising poster with a rainbow image, I have selected about 10 pictures to create this “Melting Rainbows”. The inkjet prints of “Rainbow Form” were placed in the balcony of my room and the changing process of the surface was observed and photographed.
The series “Melting Rainbows” has about 111 pictures now.

You really need to blow these images up to get a good sense of their detail. In fact, I wish I could see these gigantic, like 10 feet tall. I love all the tiny details in the droplets of water, the way the color streaks and blends together. They kind of look like brightly colored spirits. I’m not really sure if the book collecting Melting Rainbows is available yet, but if you’re interested I’d suggest you try ordering from here.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 22, 2011 / By

The Illustrations of Noper

Ilustrations by Noper

Ilustrations by Noper

Ilustrations by Noper

Click images to enlarge

I received an email earlier in the week from a fella’ named Noper, no proper name given or found, a Romanian illustrator who’s got a really fantastic style. And I mean that literally, his style reminds me of fantasy/comic illustrators like Moebius or Geoff Darrow. I like that his creatures are slightly out there but still semi-realistic in the way they’re presented. The images above were for a campaign created by Grolsch beer called Bucharest by Hand, which asked artists to reinterpret spaces around Bucharest. Noper chose to photograph Bucharest and insert his awesome creatures into them. I’ma huge fan of people doing work like this, especially when it comes off as seamlessly as these images.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 22, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Skulls in Space Suits

Skulls in Space Suits

Skulls in Space Suits

The first skeleton in a space suit I saw, I thought “that’s pretty strange” but after easily finding more my thoughts turned to “what is going on with all these skeletons in space suits?” Replacing the head of a brave hero with a skull speaks pretty loudly, but what exactly it says depends on the ear. I don’t tend to think that these are cynical moves, but can easily see why someone would say so. They could probably convince me of it.

To me, the images are ironic. With all of the technology it has taken for us to travel in vacuum of space, and with all of the legacy that travel has created for the men and women involved; as pioneering and brave an act it was— we are all still going to die. Okay, that does sound pretty cynical. But the point isn’t that we’re eventually going to die, but that we can accomplish a lot before we do die. Or maybe it’s something much more simple: space travel is dangerous. Or that even the bravest folks are fundamentally the same as us. I’m not sure, but I’m open to suggestions.

To me, these are some of the strangest space suit images. They beg many questions and answer virtually none.

Alex

Alex Dent

April 22, 2011 / By

‘The Ruins of Detroit’ by Marchand & Meffre

"Les Ruines de Detroit" par Marchand et Meffre

"Les Ruines de Detroit" par Marchand et Meffre

‘The Ruins of Detroit’ is the title of a body of work by two amazingly talented self-taught French photographers: Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre. Both photographers have a fascination with ruins and in 2005, after seeing photos of Detroit, they decided that they needed to travel there and try and capture some of the devastation that had swept through the city. For five years they collaborated on the project; originally running it as a series for TIme magazine, it has now become a series of exhibitions and an incredible looking book.

Of all the cities in the US, Detroit seems to have been hit hardest by the economic downturn. Marchand & Meffre’s show libraries empty, schools destroyed, and concert halls, theatres and hotels literally falling apart. For a city that once stood as the cradle of modern mass-production it’s a haunting reminder of the ephemerality of all things. For Marchand & Meffre, this reminder is core to the work “Detroit presents all archetypal buildings of an American city in a state of mummification” they say on their site. “Its splendid decaying monuments are, no less than the Pyramids of Egypt, the Coliseum of Rome, or the Acropolis in Athens, remnants of the passing of a great Empire”.

To see more of the series head to their website, or if you’re lucky enough to be in Paris this summer their work will open this Thursday at the Galerie Wanted and run until the 15th of September.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

April 22, 2011 / By

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