Sensing Architecture

Sensing Architecture

Sensing Architecture

Honestly, this video is more than a little strange, but I think it is funny and joyful in a way that’s intriguing, even if a little murky. From the somber start until the concrete makeout session, there’s an increasing playfulness about interacting with architecture. I guess you could say this week has been about architecture taking itself less seriously. The video was posted by Fleck, member in a collective of architecture students called Tesseract. There is some excellent work on both sites, including some fun prints. I happened to pick up this print because it made me want to laugh. Similar to how you can tell the guy licking the concrete wall wants to laugh, but I’m not doing anything gross.

Alex.

Alex Dent

April 21, 2011 / By

Swoon’s Glorious Cut Paper Installation at ‘Art In The Streets’

Swoon's Cut Paper Installation at Art In The Streets

Swoon's Cut Paper Installation at Art In The Streets

Swoon's Cut Paper Installation at Art In The Streets

Swoon's Cut Paper Installation at Art In The Streets

Swoon's Cut Paper Installation at Art In The Streets

I honestly don’t think I’ve ever gasped at art before, at least not until seeing Swoon’s immense installation at Art In The Streets. There are few things that are amazing about her installation that gave me such a sense of awe. First, it’s in a room of it’s own, that has to be at least 30 feet tall. There are two entrances to the room, one is the through the front which is masked by some currents, the second is through the Spike Jonze video exhibit. I went through the Spike Jonze video entrance, which you can imagine is pitch black so you can watch his film. The experience of going from darkness and almost, discovering, this immense, yet fragile installation is shocking. I was literally shocked, couldn’t move, couldn’t catch my breath.

Another interesting fact is that she worked on the piece for nearly a month, mostly in complete secrecy. She let only a select group of people into the exhibit until she was done. It’s also worth noting that some of the paper is cut by hand while other pieces have been laser cut. The way the light from under the exhibit is extremely beautiful, as it creates even more precious shapes all over the white, linen walls. This was without a doubt my single favorite thing in the entire Art In The Streets exhibit. The sheer scale and work that was put into this piece is beyond my comprehension. If there’s one reason to see this exhibit, it’s the chance to walk around this piece and take in it’s beauty.

You can see more photos of the installation under the cut, lots of photos of the details and minutiae that makes this piece so special. I’ve also put a video under the cut which gives you a making-of video by Levi’s Workshop (we’ll get to them as well) showing the construction of this piece. Thanks to Wellington for the heads up.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 21, 2011 / By

The Bicycle Cap by peSeta for the New Museum

peSeta, The Bicycle Cap, New Museum

peSeta, The Bicycle Cap, New Museum

peSeta, The Bicycle Cap, New Museum

Like the Everynone Symmetry video posted Tuesday, some things just belong together naturally. They’re made for each other. They may serve completely different functions, but they are drawn together by something in their nature. Example: a bicycle and a sewing machine. They seem like two completely different things, but are bound together by symmetry: they spin, they connect, and they are human accessories.

What if we take the idea of symmetry and push it one step forward to have symmetrical items creating?

Well, no one has ever really thought of that…except for the brilliant fashion/art/lifestyle brand, peSeta. Working with The New Museum, the Madrid based company noticed a bicycle and a sewing machine having a little bit of a love affair and wondered what the two would create, if given the opportunity. The creation? A bicycle cap!

The above video is a totally adorable, cute, even silly bite-sized documentary chronicling the genesis and process involved in creating the hats. It makes you love your bike even more and makes you covet–maybe even slobber–over these “NEW” hats. I watched the video giggling with happiness over how excited they were for the project and over how dang creative they are: the idea is brilliant, the process is brilliant, and they are just so dang brilliantly cute, with their Spain-Spanish accents.

I don’t know about you, but I would die if I could have one of those hats. Here’s hoping I make it to NYC in time to snag one from TNM…or, that I, too, can make my bike and a sewing machine fall in love!

KYLE

KYLE FITZPATRICK

April 21, 2011 / By

Shepard Fairey at ‘Art In The Streets’

Shepard Fairey at Art In The Streets at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Shepard Fairey at Art In The Streets at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Shepard Fairey at Art In The Streets at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Shepard Fairey at Art In The Streets at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Click images to enlarge

I wanted to share one of the photo sets from Art In The Streets, even if it is a bit late in the day. I’m gonna be sharing more of these sets over the next couple days, but I thought Shepard Fairey was a good way to start. I’m a huge fan of his work, I love what he’s done with his art and where his career has gone. His inclusion into the exhibit is a no duh, and I was glad to see that he was afforded a nice space to be displayed in. What was cool is that he had a few original pieces in the show, including what I think is the original Obey Giant sticker from way back in 1989. That’s pretty sick. What’s crazy is you see all of the paintings in these photos, but his part of the exhibit is such a tiny part of a larger scheme.

Check back tomorrow for two more photo sets by Swoon and the area called the ‘Street Market’. There’s also more photos underneath the cut, don’t miss ‘em.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 20, 2011 / By

‘Art in the Streets’, at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA – Los Angeles Gives Street Art It’s Due

'Art in the Streets', at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA - Los Angeles Gives Street Art It's Due

Jeffrey Deitch at Art in the Streets, at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Art in the Streets, at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Art in the Streets, at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Click images to enlarge

Last Thursday I had a chance to visit the opening of Art in the Streets at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, the most comprehensive exhibit of street art pretty much ever. It was an amazing event with a ton of artists in attendance like Shepard Fairey, Futura, Steven Powers (ESPO), REAS, Fab Five Freddy and tons more. I honestly felt like a kid in a candy store as I walked through the space. I was surrounded by the work of the artists that I’ve admired for years now, and to be able to take the time and soak it in while no one else was really around was fantastic.

Enough talking though, it’s best to see the space for yourself through photos. Since I have so many photos though, I’m going to be breaking out certain artists into their own posts to present them in the correct manner. I ended up taking 559 photos, so trust me, I have a lot to share.

I should also point out that all the photos are pretty large, you just need to click them to see them larger. I hoep you like them all, and if you get the chance go see this show, it’s stunning.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 20, 2011 / By

Sights & Sounds Presents Broken Social Scene: ‘Forgiveness Rock Record’ by Alex Westgate

Alex Westgate

Well, we’re finishing up our second Sights & Sounds wallpaper series devoted to Broken Social Scene, and I couldn’t be happier with how it turned out. For BSS’s last and most recent record, Forgiveness Rock Record, we’ve got Alex Westgate, a fantastic illustrator and designer. Alex is currently studying at Ontario College of Art & Design but you can tell he’sn already is a really talented artist.

As for his wallpaper, Alex decided to take a nostalgic look at the album:

For my wallpaper I chose to focus in on the song that I felt best represented the feel and “forgiveness” theme of the album. “Sentimental X’s” is a song that undoubtably deals with the bands off and on dynamic. Emily Haines sings ” A friend of a friend you used to call. Or a friend of a friend you used. You used to call.” To me the song is about forgotten, neglected friendships and the strong emotional ties that can be formed between two people. The idea that even when a relationship is taken for granted the bond that exists between both parties is never broken. I wanted to show this through the relationship we have with material objects and the meaning we give to them, things like toys from our childhood and other objects we no longer have use for. We store them away and may never touch or even look at them for years but because of our sentimental ties, we cannot bare to part with them.

Super rad, thanks so much Alex. And yet again, a huge thanks to Andrew & Matt McCracken of Doublenaut for gathering together such an awesome crew of creative folks from Toronto. If you haven’t seen the other Broken Social Scene wallpapers be sure to click here. We’ll be back to some non-music related wallpapers next week, and in a little bit we’ll start up a new Sights & Sounds.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 20, 2011 / By

Maps by Lena Corwin

Maps by Lena Corwin

Maps by Lena Corwin

Maps by Lena Corwin

As textile designer and illustrator Lena Corwin points out in the introduction to her new book, Maps: Illustrated Cities, the process of map making involves a “mix of accuracy and fantasy.” For me, the fantasy element is key to the design appeal of Corwin’s maps, whereby she filters her portrayal of each city’s topography through her distinct aesthetic.

Maps features 20 maps of cities in the United States and 20 maps of select cities from around the world that represent over seven years of illustrating cities in a style that takes its cue from vintage books. Providing another perspective on each urban subject, the book also features interviews with shop owners who give their own impressions of their local city. Topographical perfection is irrelevant, these are the maps I want to use to get around. You can grab your own copy of Maps through Other Books.

Photographs by Lena Corwin for ~>O<~.

Danica

April 20, 2011 / By

Nils Ole Lund

Nils Ole Lund

Nils Ole Lund

I came across these great collages on Archive of Affinities and thought you might like them. They are the work of Danish architect Nils-Ole Lund, author of Collage Architecture. It’s hard not to smile at the top collage “the Fashion of Architecture,” but it raises a point: architecture is never timeless. Fashion relies on seasonal trends; while there’s a big difference between concrete and cotton, gold lamé isn’t terribly different from gold-tinted window film. Lund illustrates this in his collage. (Incidentally, the gold-tinted portion of the building even has a name that sounds more like a textile— the curtain wall.) Of course, time scales for seasonal fashion trends and decade-long architectural trends are very different. You can throw away your jelly shoes, again, much more quickly than you could throw away the conversation pit in your living room, or even the asbestos there. Still, both Fashion and Architecture are cultural artifacts specific to the the technology, time period and trends that produced them.

Alex

Alex Dent

April 20, 2011 / By

Google+