Taisuke Koyama’s ‘Melting Rainbows’

Taisuke Koyama's Melting Rainbows

Taisuke Koyama's Melting Rainbows

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I’m in love with these crazy rainbow images by Taisuke Koyama, a Japanese artist doing some really interesting work. His series Melting Rainbows was created almost by accident:

From the last series “Rainbow Form” in 2009, which was the closed-up pictures of advertising poster with a rainbow image, I have selected about 10 pictures to create this “Melting Rainbows”. The inkjet prints of “Rainbow Form” were placed in the balcony of my room and the changing process of the surface was observed and photographed.
The series “Melting Rainbows” has about 111 pictures now.

You really need to blow these images up to get a good sense of their detail. In fact, I wish I could see these gigantic, like 10 feet tall. I love all the tiny details in the droplets of water, the way the color streaks and blends together. They kind of look like brightly colored spirits. I’m not really sure if the book collecting Melting Rainbows is available yet, but if you’re interested I’d suggest you try ordering from here.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 22, 2011 / By

The Illustrations of Noper

Ilustrations by Noper

Ilustrations by Noper

Ilustrations by Noper

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I received an email earlier in the week from a fella’ named Noper, no proper name given or found, a Romanian illustrator who’s got a really fantastic style. And I mean that literally, his style reminds me of fantasy/comic illustrators like Moebius or Geoff Darrow. I like that his creatures are slightly out there but still semi-realistic in the way they’re presented. The images above were for a campaign created by Grolsch beer called Bucharest by Hand, which asked artists to reinterpret spaces around Bucharest. Noper chose to photograph Bucharest and insert his awesome creatures into them. I’ma huge fan of people doing work like this, especially when it comes off as seamlessly as these images.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 22, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Skulls in Space Suits

Skulls in Space Suits

Skulls in Space Suits

The first skeleton in a space suit I saw, I thought “that’s pretty strange” but after easily finding more my thoughts turned to “what is going on with all these skeletons in space suits?” Replacing the head of a brave hero with a skull speaks pretty loudly, but what exactly it says depends on the ear. I don’t tend to think that these are cynical moves, but can easily see why someone would say so. They could probably convince me of it.

To me, the images are ironic. With all of the technology it has taken for us to travel in vacuum of space, and with all of the legacy that travel has created for the men and women involved; as pioneering and brave an act it was— we are all still going to die. Okay, that does sound pretty cynical. But the point isn’t that we’re eventually going to die, but that we can accomplish a lot before we do die. Or maybe it’s something much more simple: space travel is dangerous. Or that even the bravest folks are fundamentally the same as us. I’m not sure, but I’m open to suggestions.

To me, these are some of the strangest space suit images. They beg many questions and answer virtually none.

Alex

Alex Dent

April 22, 2011 / By

‘The Ruins of Detroit’ by Marchand & Meffre

"Les Ruines de Detroit" par Marchand et Meffre

"Les Ruines de Detroit" par Marchand et Meffre

‘The Ruins of Detroit’ is the title of a body of work by two amazingly talented self-taught French photographers: Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre. Both photographers have a fascination with ruins and in 2005, after seeing photos of Detroit, they decided that they needed to travel there and try and capture some of the devastation that had swept through the city. For five years they collaborated on the project; originally running it as a series for TIme magazine, it has now become a series of exhibitions and an incredible looking book.

Of all the cities in the US, Detroit seems to have been hit hardest by the economic downturn. Marchand & Meffre’s show libraries empty, schools destroyed, and concert halls, theatres and hotels literally falling apart. For a city that once stood as the cradle of modern mass-production it’s a haunting reminder of the ephemerality of all things. For Marchand & Meffre, this reminder is core to the work “Detroit presents all archetypal buildings of an American city in a state of mummification” they say on their site. “Its splendid decaying monuments are, no less than the Pyramids of Egypt, the Coliseum of Rome, or the Acropolis in Athens, remnants of the passing of a great Empire”.

To see more of the series head to their website, or if you’re lucky enough to be in Paris this summer their work will open this Thursday at the Galerie Wanted and run until the 15th of September.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

April 22, 2011 / By

Sensing Architecture

Sensing Architecture

Sensing Architecture

Honestly, this video is more than a little strange, but I think it is funny and joyful in a way that’s intriguing, even if a little murky. From the somber start until the concrete makeout session, there’s an increasing playfulness about interacting with architecture. I guess you could say this week has been about architecture taking itself less seriously. The video was posted by Fleck, member in a collective of architecture students called Tesseract. There is some excellent work on both sites, including some fun prints. I happened to pick up this print because it made me want to laugh. Similar to how you can tell the guy licking the concrete wall wants to laugh, but I’m not doing anything gross.

Alex.

Alex Dent

April 21, 2011 / By

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