Innovation Via Iteration: Yves Behar’s Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

As of lately I’ve been really curious about people’s process when it comes to creation. I try to post about it often because I think there’s a value in learning from how people do the things they do. So I was really inspired when I saw these photos of Yves Behar and his team working on the SAYL chair for Herman Miller. His motivation was simple:

“How do we create a task chair that is attainable? Can we make a comfortable, supportive, healthy, and beautiful chair at a lower price point?”

As for his inspiration, he looked to the Golden Gate bridge, probably the most famous suspension bridge in the world and it’s ability to support so much weight with so little. And I think that’s what’s so interesting about this chair, is that Yves and his team were trying to create something that was basically nothing. It’s honestly the bare bones of what a chair should be. I also enjoy the fact that they tried building this chair in so many different ways. There’s that quote by Benjamin Franklin which says, “I didn’t fail the test, I just found 100 ways to do it wrong,” which I thought was quite apropos.

There are lots more photos under the cut, be sure to check them all out.

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Bobby Solomon

May 24, 2011 / By

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