Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

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I first wrote about Luke Pearson about two years ago when Luke Pearson“>he won the Holiday Wallpaper Competition with his hysterically frantic illustration. He’s been pretty dang busy since then, doing a lot of work with the folks over at Nobrow, including a new 24 page comic which he just finished called Hildafolk. What I love about Luke’s work is his detailed line work and this sense of fun and energy that comes out of each of his pieces. Even these illustrations he did for Little White Lies magazine, although more straightforward, have this playfulness to them that really catch my eye.

Definitely take a few minutes and check out the rest of his profile by clicking here.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

May 24, 2011 / By

Innovation Via Iteration: Yves Behar’s Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

As of lately I’ve been really curious about people’s process when it comes to creation. I try to post about it often because I think there’s a value in learning from how people do the things they do. So I was really inspired when I saw these photos of Yves Behar and his team working on the SAYL chair for Herman Miller. His motivation was simple:

“How do we create a task chair that is attainable? Can we make a comfortable, supportive, healthy, and beautiful chair at a lower price point?”

As for his inspiration, he looked to the Golden Gate bridge, probably the most famous suspension bridge in the world and it’s ability to support so much weight with so little. And I think that’s what’s so interesting about this chair, is that Yves and his team were trying to create something that was basically nothing. It’s honestly the bare bones of what a chair should be. I also enjoy the fact that they tried building this chair in so many different ways. There’s that quote by Benjamin Franklin which says, “I didn’t fail the test, I just found 100 ways to do it wrong,” which I thought was quite apropos.

There are lots more photos under the cut, be sure to check them all out.

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Bobby Solomon

May 24, 2011 / By

A Multi-Hued, Multi-Faceted Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Have you ever seen an enthusiastic child hug a cat? They will squeeze and squeeze until the cat gets annoyed and scampers away. The Treehugger Pavilion reminded me of such enthusiasm.

This pentagonal pavilion was built surrounding a tree for the National Garden Show in Koblenz, Germany, and I think the form of the supports and the color-changing ceiling are all very exciting. That said, I think the central tree is a little lost in all of this architectural enthusiasm. It’s always a very real possibility that photographs just don’t convey the space similar to how it is actually experienced; for instance, would you guess that the floor plan of this structure was square, or pentagonal? The tree trunk seems nearly strangled at the floor and ceiling, but maybe the transition is just too abrupt for me. From the inside of the pavilion, the canopy of the tree is abstracted as a geometric array of back-lit LED panels. In short, I can’t decide what this project is about: the tree or the pavilion that hugs it?

For more photos and information, click here.

Alex

Alex Dent

May 24, 2011 / By

‘Speaking In Tongues’ and ‘Culture War’, Two New Tracks from Arcade Fire

Arcade Fire by Anton Corbijn

Out of nowhere two new Arcade Fire tracks were dropped on the world, both premiered in the U.K. on the Zane Lowe show. The songs were ripped from his radio show, so the quality isn’t the greatest, but they still sound pretty great in the artistic sense. Supposedly these songs will be released on a deluxe version of The Suburbs and maybe included in the Spike Jones directed short film Scenes From The Suburbs.

The first song is called Speaking In Tongues and features some minor vocals from David Byrne and the second is called Culture War. I prefer Speaking In Tongues over Culture War, but they’re both pretty nice and definitely fit into the vibe of the other songs from The Suburbs. Props to ListenBeforeYouBuy for ripping these tracks and making them available to everyone.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

May 23, 2011 / By

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

My current sound system set-up at home is a set of Joey Roth ceramic speakers, which in my opinion are some of the most beautiful objects ever created. Simple in form and materials, they sound amazing, and of course they look amazing. But the folks over at Studio Joon&Jung have thrown in their hat and have created a set of speakers that are rustic and charming because of their handmade characteristics. Says their website:

The idea for the ‘the natural speaker’ derived from the desire to create an absolutely unique, handcrafted speaker for the interior space. Whereas a lot of speakers are constructed to produce a rather fat bass and sharp high tones, we felt the sound was kind of stuck inside the speakers, missing a natural vibe and ambiance. During the development of the ‘the natural speaker’ we discovered the great properties of porcelain as a speaker casing, providing a clear resonance and mellow sound.

Amplified inside the ceramic and wood transmission construction, the sound gains a slight echo, creating a natural feeling of resonance, resembling the distinct flair of an acoustic instrument right in front of you.

I think my favorite details on the speakers are the small, leather straps that keep the wood and the ceramic firmly held together. It’s a detail that could have been overlooked but was well considered. I’m so curious to know how they sound in person. Speakers are so subjective to an individual listener, but they seem to be really well crafted. If you’d like more info and photos on the Natural Speakers click here.

Found through Dezeen

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

May 23, 2011 / By

Museum Aan de Stroom by Neutelngs Riedijk

Museum Aan de Stroom by Neutelngs Riedijk

Museum Aan de Stroom by Neutelngs Riedijk

This is new old news, or almost news that has been in hibernation. (Did you know that if this building were in Canada, it would still be in hibernation?) But this building, a public museum, is in Antwerp and actually about the history of Antwerp: “Visitors will discover how Antwerp and the world have been indisputably linked with one another for hundreds of years.” For the past one year, the finished building has been closed to the public while artifacts slowly migrated into the museum. And now, it’s ready to open.

I’m a huge fan of the architects, Neutelings Riedijk because their projects are distinctive but also straightforward. Well, maybe not always straightforward: they once designed a casino that looked like a pineapple. This project is not a fruit, and has a circulation path that spirals through the building, easily identifiable thanks to the corrugated glazing. If you can’t make it to Antwerp, because you’re snowed in or something, you can take a virutal tour here.

Alex

Alex Dent

May 23, 2011 / By

Gestalten’s ‘Book Art’ by Paul Sloman: A Conversation With the Designer/Editor and Book Giveaway

Book Art, Paul Sloman, Gestalten

We here at The Fox Is Black love reading and especially love the work that Gestalten releases. They constantly release books that are interesting, creative, beautiful, and greatly intelligent. We had the opportunity to speak with the compiler, designer, and editor of one of their newest books: Book Art by Paul Sloman.

Book Art, which is an exploration of the physical book and how it has become the template for various forms of art, is both a history and art book. On one hand, Sloman–along with author Christine Antaya–outlines the history of the book, the technology surrounding it, as well as what the book has become. On the other hand–and closely tied to what the physical book has become–Sloman and Antaya outline various ways the physical book has been used for art, from sculpture to installation to design. Book Art does an excellent job at displaying this art form and opens up a large conversation between written texts, repurposing items for art, and the intermix of the two in the twenty-first century.

I recently had the chance to ask Sloman a few questions related to that: the physical book, the art, and the future of both. And, with that, we have an exciting opportunity for readers to snag a copy of the book–courtesy of Gestalten!

Continue reading this post…

KYLE FITZPATRICK

May 23, 2011 / By

‘Anthems for a 17-Year-Old Girl’ by Young Buffalo

Young Buffalo

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It would have been great to have made it to SXSW back in March but regrettably it was not to be. The closest I got was a series of tales from a friend who had played at it and a long list of bands that I’ve been meaning to check out. One such band is the Oxford Town based trio Young Buffalo who managed to catch my eye during the barrage of tweets, blogposts and articles that I read during festival time.

Though the group are fairly new on the scene, and by the looks of things, quite young themselves – they’re already showing an incredible knack for playing great tunes. Check out their rendition of Broken Social Scenes’ Anthems for a 17-Year-Old Girl for example. Being a huge fan of BSS I’d normally steer well clear of cover versions but this one totally kills it. The guys manage to wrap the tune around a wonderful three-part harmony and pull off the songs beautiful slow-build with an effortless charm that works perfectly. You can listen to more of their stuff over on bandcamp and keep your eyes peeled for these guys in the future. I’m sure we’ll be hearing more great things from them very soon.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

May 23, 2011 / By

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