World Premiere of Alex Stapleton’s ‘OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets’


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OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets is a great glimpse into the making of the current MOCA exhibit. When I saw the footage of Barry McGee and Stephen Powers painting and putting together their incredible installation at the museum I gained a whole new level of respect for them, especially since they created a majority of the pieces at the location. Swoon did the same thing with her team and it was awesome to see them on the ground with X-Acto blades.

The director even managed to interview REVOK before he was arrested for vandalism back in April. He’s now serving 120 days in jail with a $320,000 bail, an amount SABER pointed out as “over $100,000 more than OJ Simpson’s, and OJ was on trial for murder”. So, it was no surprise that the MSK crew were yelling at the screen whenever LAPD officers appeared on screen. In a candid moment towards the end of the film, Shepard Fairey talks about his family and what they think of his graffiti “My daughter knows to only talk to the police if she’s in trouble…not when when she’s putting up stickers”, an act that Shepard may or may not have perpetrated on the stalls of the men’s bathroom.

When the last credit rolled, Jonathan Wells, Programming Director of Levi’s Film Workshop and Executive Producer of the film, invited SABER, Mr. Cartoon, C.R. Stecyk III, Shepard Fairey, Patti Astor, Alex Stapleton, Neckface and exhibit curators Aaron Rose, Roger Gastman and Ethel Seno to come onstage for a Q&A. There was an awkward silence as the crowd built up enough courage to start asking questions like “Where do you get your paint from” to which Neckface replied “I started out stealing my shit…and I still steal my shit” – making us bust up laughing.

“I understand why people get frustrated by graffiti…If I caught some kid tagging my fence I’d knock him out, but if I didn’t catch him, I’d cross his name out first before I buffed it.” – Mr. Cartoon

By the end of the night we had met all of our rebel heroes, heard Shepard Fairey dj a set of punk and hip-hop, and had gotten a better perspective of all the hard work that went into putting Art in the Streets together.

A big thanks to the Levi’s Workshop for inviting us, and a congrats for making all of this happen. ALl of the videos were created at the Levi’s Workshop in the MOCA, where you can make videos or rent cameras for your own projects.

Daniel

Bobby Solomon

May 25, 2011 / By

Stussy x Marvel

David Shrigley's Hulk for Stussy x Marvel
John K's Crystal & Johnny Strange for Stussy x Marvel Todd James (AKA REAS)'s She-Hulk for Stussy x Marvel

I’m a little late on this but recently the Californian based clothing brand Stussy joined forces with both Marvel Comics and a group of artists to create a series of special edition t-shirts. This is the second series in their Stussy x Marvel range and this one is particularly great because of the talent that they’ve been able to attract. Above you can see some good examples of the kind of thing to expect from the series, with each superhero being re-imagined in the artist’s signature style. Above, you caught David Shrigley’s Incredible Hulk, Ren and Stimpy creator John K’s take on Crystal and Johnny Storm, and Todd James’s She-Hulk. They’re pretty crazy but I think they’re really great.

The talent doesn’t end just there either, check out their site and you’ll see people like the LA tattoo artist Mr. Cartoon, the American animator Bill Plympton and British illustrator Will Sweeney have all contributed designs for the project. I think my personal favorite might be James Jarvis’ take on The Thing which just has so much character. If you’re interested in finding out more about the project I’ve included a little video below the cut which was made by the guys at HBTV. It’s fairly typical marketing schtick but it’s worth the watch to see plenty of the artists speaking about the influences that Marvel has brought upon them and you’ll also catch Mr. Cartoon do a sweet little rendition of the Spiderman theme!

Philip
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Philip Kennedy

May 25, 2011 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Yours, Roxanne

Yours, Roxanne

It’s already Wednesday, we’ve hit the halfway point and you deserve some new art to grace your monitor. Thankfully, Roxanne Daner, better known as Yours, Roxanne, has you covered. Roxanne lives and works here in Los Angeles and her style is totally fun with lots of great textures and tones. I feel like her desktop wallpaper is what’s going on behind the scenes of Dan Cassaro’s wallpaper, and that’s partly why I love it. In her own words, “I called it Hard Drive and well… it illustrates whats going on inside your computer to keep everything running smoothly.” I would certainly hope that a gnome, a dog, a bird and a rabbit are doing a good job making my computer keep ticking. Beautiful work, Roxanne!

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

May 25, 2011 / By

Renée Rossouw’s Pattern Diary, An Artistic Investigation

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw is a young designer from Cape Town who has recently completed a cool, interdisciplinary project that ties in writing, pattern making, and ceramics. The result is Pattern Diary, where Rossouw hand painted patterns inspired by her 2010 diary entries on to vases. The result is a collection of many unique, different ceramics, all hand painted, all different, but all working well together as a set. A collaboration with Italy’s Bosa Cermaiche, the pieces all compliment each other, all using a similar visual vocabulary to express very, very different abstract ideas: one vase may have a pattern that resembles suspended bricks, while another may represent a night’s sky or part of a vehicle. The white base of the ceramics, the use of only reds and blues, and Rossouw’s strong style provide for any one piece to stand alone quite nicely or with one or two other vase buddies to form a crew.

Each piece is a different thought, but are obviously from the same thinker. Pattern Diary is a clever and beautiful means of expression that ties so much together, from telling the story of an artist’s personal journey to providing a new outlet for visual illustration.

Found through Yatzer

KYLE

KYLE FITZPATRICK

May 24, 2011 / By

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Click images to enlarge

I first wrote about Luke Pearson about two years ago when Luke Pearson“>he won the Holiday Wallpaper Competition with his hysterically frantic illustration. He’s been pretty dang busy since then, doing a lot of work with the folks over at Nobrow, including a new 24 page comic which he just finished called Hildafolk. What I love about Luke’s work is his detailed line work and this sense of fun and energy that comes out of each of his pieces. Even these illustrations he did for Little White Lies magazine, although more straightforward, have this playfulness to them that really catch my eye.

Definitely take a few minutes and check out the rest of his profile by clicking here.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

May 24, 2011 / By

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