The LGBT Creative Series: Interview with Micah Lidberg

The LGBT Creative Series: Interview with Micah Lidberg

Micah Lidberg

Micah Lidberg

Who are you, where are you and what do you do?
I’m Micah Lidberg, and I’m an illustrator living in Kansas City, Missouri.

What are you currently working on?
Well, I just moved my studio so I’ve been working on getting it set up. As for projects, I’m working on a pack for Granimator™, an app that lets you create custom wallpapers for you iPad, and I’m also working on a book cover, a logo, and a few personal projects as well.

The LGBT Creative Series: Interview with Micah Lidberg

When did you come out and what was the story?
The whole process took a few years but I was out around twenty-two. I had to reconcile my sexuality and christianity, so for a long time I was just trickling ‘confessions’ to my family and close friends. As expected, there was a lot tension between my beliefs and orientation. It got to a point where I realized the only solution was to be honest. I had to let go of things I didn’t really believe and acknowledge an aspect of myself that had long been suppressed. That was a rough bit. Unlearning a twenty-year-old worldview of fear and judgement is a difficult pill. Fortunately, the difficulties didn’t last and I was incredibly lucky to be surrounded by a lot of love and acceptance. I’ve been out for about four years now.

The LGBT Creative Series: Interview with Micah Lidberg

How does being queer effect your work, if at all?
I don’t think it has a direct role in my work. However, it’s freed me up to explore things I may have otherwise avoided. I think men and women still have very restrictive gender roles and that can limit the ideas an individual interacts with. Though, if you’re gay, those limits seem to be less rigid. As a creative person, that’s a flexibility I cherish very much. Also, there’s valuable insight to be gained in being excluded from a group. You’re shown the importance of connection through it’s absence. I think this is a large source of my love for ‘excluded’ things and I find it’s something that filters into my work.

The LGBT Creative Series: Interview with Micah Lidberg

In your mind, what should gay pride be and how would you celebrate it?
I actually hope for the day when gay pride isn’t necessary. Pride events are born out of inequality. When the time comes, and we are accepted as a part of the whole, having an event that distinguishes us ceases to make much sense. However, we’re not there yet. Until then, I think Pride is an excellent chance for the community to come together to be an example of love and acceptance. While I don’t personally relate to all the current forms of gay pride, I think showing my support for the community is what’s important for me. I try to attend whatever event is around. Here in the States, where we enjoy a greater degree of freedom, I think it’s a time to have fun and to be happy with who we are.

Bobby Solomon

July 18, 2011 / By

Google+