Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

I don’t know what rock I’ve been under, but there are some seriously cool fonts to be had at UK type foundry, Colophon. And for an extra twist all the of the typefaces are limited edition which I’ve never heard of in font-land before. Knowing just how much intense technical detail goes into each letter, and then to make the whole batch limited edition makes them all the more special. Colophon also spends a lot of love on the sample books for each face, they are works of art in their own right.

And the fonts themselves? For the most part they’re simple and timeless, but with enough flair to make them unique. Want, want them ALL. Check ‘em out!

– Margot

October 28, 2011 / By

Herzog & de Meuron’s VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Constructed between 2007-2010, Herzog & de Meuron‘s VitraHaus is certainly a striking building. Located in Weil am Rhein, Germany; the building is an impressive design showroom for the Swiss furniture manufactures Vitra. The five-storey building is made up of five stacked volumes, and it can be found on the north-side of the Vitra Campus, close to Frank Gehry’s Vitra Design Museum (1989) and Tadao Ando’s Congress Hall (1993).

Architecturally, it looks like a fascinating building. From the images I’ve seen, it appears to be physically striking while also maintaining it’s key role as an effective showroom space on the inside. Recently I discovered some excellent images of the building by the Swiss photographer Gaëtan Rossier. Rossier has a great eye which I feel really complements the sensibilities of both Vitra and the architects Herzog & de Meuron. A selection of Rossier’s images can be seen above and the complete set can be viewed online here.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

October 27, 2011 / By

Interview with Oki Sato, head of Nendo (video)

Interview with Oki Sato, head of Nendo (video)

Interview with Oki Sato, head of Nendo (video)

The group over at Protein recently did an interview with head of nendo Oki Sato who sits down and shares a bit about his work and his process. I love the work that nendo produces, so it was really nice to get to hear him speak. If you’re curious about the project in the background you can see more photos of it by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2011 / By

What if normal people had super powers? The new movie ‘Chronicle’ is a good guess

What if normal people had super powers? The new movie 'Chronicle' is a good guess

What if normal people had super powers? The new movie 'Chronicle' is a good guess

For probably most of my life I’ve wondered what it would be like to have mutant powers. My intense imagination allowed me to imagine myself flying over buildings while I was sitting in the car, or throwing around objects simply by thinking about them. These days there are a lot of movies about such things, but most of them tend to fall short on the reality of situations like that, for example, dressing up in leather outfits and stopping the cuban missile crisis. That’s where the new film Chronicle comes in.

What I gathered from the trailer, the film is about three college bros who discover a mysterious something and gain special powers from it, one of which ends up turning bad. Watching the parts where they start using their powers though is awesome, and the idea that it’s like a muscle, the more you use it the stronger you are, is a great idea. They don’t really touch on concepts like that in the comic books, so it’s a fun detail. Hopefully it turns out as good as this trailer makes it look.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2011 / By

‘Euphorie’, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

Euphorie, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

Euphorie, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

Euphorie, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

I can’t get enough of these recorded installation’s by Supakitch and Koralie, and thankfully they can’t stop making them. I’ve posted about two of their installations before, each of them are extremely beautiful and all made by hand with a lot of hard work, and this one is just as special. I really like how they’ve included the puffy, airbrushed clouds and creatures into the work, it brings an unique element that paint pens can’t quite make. Sit back and watch these masters do their thing.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2011 / By

Prototypes and Moving Parts from the work of Tom Kundig

Kinetic Architecture by Olson Kundig Architects

Kinetic Architecture by Olson Kundig Architects

Two things I hand’t realized until now:
(1) Olson Kundig Architects posts videos to Vimeo and (2) how frequently the firm engineers dynamic enclosures into their work. It’s almost as it Reitveld never died, but instead moved to Seattle and fell in love with naturally-finished materials. It’s a bummer that this video doesn’t have any sound, either background music or explanations of the problems and solutions that these moving building giblets address (because it’s not apparent in every instance why things are moving or why they are moving as much as they are.) Still, it’s impressive to watch a wall or ceiling open; it’s a kind of dynamism that’s been a persistent vision of architects more often than it has been a reality in buildings. At least for the length of this mute video, we can see a few steel, glass, wood and concerete examples.

Alex.

Alex Dent

October 27, 2011 / By

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Hovering over a particularly verdant parcel of land in Fiskars, Finland is this small Artist Retreat. Designed by O to 1, the petite program is clad in natural materials that do little to neutralize the project’s sharp design, at least for the time being. Eventually, the wooden bits will turn grey, better matching the metal skin and making the mass read more cohesively. Which isn’t meant to be a pointed criticism, I think this project is fantastic from its overall form all the way down to the exterior steps made from tree trunks. Of course, with a project this small there isn’t much else to talk about; how about that great paint job? It’d be nice to see an artist, or any other person, retreating inside this Artist Retreat to get a better sense of scale, but who wants their picture taken when they’re trying to get away?

Alex

Alex Dent

October 26, 2011 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Dan Matutina

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Dan Matutina

Dan Matutina

In the three years I’ve been running The Desktop Wallpaper Project I’ve made a concerted effort to not use an artist more than once. This is only because I want to keep introducing new creatives, but there are times when I go back to someone who’s work I really enjoy. Dan Matutina is a perfect example of that. His previous wallpaper featured an epic battle between a pirate and a ninja, which is still one of my favorites. This time around we decided to collaborate a bit on the wallpaper.

Over the past few months I’ve become interested in the story of Urashima Taro. It’s about a young boy who helps a sea turtle who’s being harassed by a group of children. The next day a giant sea turtle rises up from the ocean to greet Urashima Taro, who unknowingly saved the daughter of the Emperor of the Sea, Ryojin, who wants to see him to thank him. Urashima Taro is brought to the bottom of the ocean where he meets the princess again, only this time she is a beautiful maiden. He stays for a few days but then wants to go home, as his mother is ill. The princess then gives him a mysterious box called tamatebako which will protect him from harm but which she tells him never to open. When he gets back to the surface nothing is the same, his mother and his village gone. It turns out that 300 years had passed while he was underwater, though it only felt like a few days. Distraught, he opens the box given to him by the princess, only to find that it contains his age, instantly becoming old and grayed. From the sea comes the sad, sweet voice of the princess: “I told you not to open that box. In it was your old age …”

I thought this would be fun to reinterpret a bit, instead saying that Urashima Tar? woke up in the distant future, filled with all kinds of fun sci-fi stuff. So Dan was awesome enough to take a stab at this, illustrating the point when Urashima Tar? returns to the surface, accidentally being caught the fishing captain. Here’s how describes it:

It’s Taro-san meeting the 3 futuristic fishermen. We see the fisherman on their hover dock. It’s like a normal dock with boosters. :D We see the Taro-san getting caught by the captain’s fishing line that’s why he surfaced.

I love it. I think Dan does amazing things with texture and color, he gives his work such life. There’s also a minimalism that really makes these work as desktop wallpapers. A huge thanks to Dan for hustling this wallpaper out to me quickly, I’m so happy with how it turned out.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

October 26, 2011 / By

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