Matt Kish read Moby Dick, then Illustrated every single page

Matt Kish read Moby Dick, then Illustrated every single page

Matt Kish read Moby Dick, then Illustrated every single page

Call him thorough. Matt Kish has illustrated every single page of the Herman Melville novel Moby Dick. Formerly a high school English teacher, he has read the text several times, each reading reinforcing his appreciation for the depth and breadth of the work. In his own words: “Friends often question my obsession with the novel, especially since I am not a scholar or even an educator any longer, and the best explanation I have been able to come up with is that, to me, Moby-Dick is a book about everything.” Well now there is a book about the book about everything, as Matt’s 500-something illustrations of each page from the novel have been bound together in Moby Dick in Pictures. His idea of illustrating a page each day is almost exactly the opposite of the re-covered contests and you can buy some of the original illustrations here.

Alex

Alex Dent

October 28, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

No Surrender

DAL’s newest work, No Surrender, was made in Paris, France this past September. Unlike many of DAL’s other works, this piece is tucked away in an intimate space, enclosed from passersby. The spaceman in No Surrender is traversing through an urban terrain that is being reclaimed by nature: a space that could be easily overlooked, but not forgotten.

While intimate, No Surrender is rather jarring. The spaceman, in DAL’s signature black and white coils, is devoid of a face. He has no identity as does the flag next to him. Its highly reminiscent of Apollo 11 imagery, where astronaut Buzz Aldrin stands next to the lunar flag–but DAL’s No Surrender wipes away the stars and stripes and leaves his space creature empty and full of possibility.

DAL is a street artist hailing from China. After studying sculpture at the NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts, he started making street art under the alias DAL in 2004.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

October 28, 2011 / By

‘Hold On’ By The Chain Gang of 1974

I’ve been hooked on this song for more than a few minutes. Something about the house build up, the ascendant beat and a ton of synths keeps me wanting to hearing the chorus over and over. In as modern take on synth pop, Kamtin Mohager aka The Chain Gang of 1974 loves to ride a big hook. The song stretches itself out over a full 8 minutes, almost a tribute to the disco breaks of the early 80s and the start of house. With a hard bass line and disjointed, unconscious lyrics, the song feels like some desperate lucid dream fading into the morning.

The music video is pretty wild. To me it is a surreal hair cutting party in some awesome orgiastic jungle, so if you wanna watch that, check it out. If anything it’ll trip you the heck out. I prefer the full 8 minute track (not the radio edit in the video) for a more head bobbing rhythm that really lets the groove shine. For those of you in LA, he’ll be here on monday.

Alec

Alec Rojas

October 28, 2011 / By

Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

Colophon Type Foundry

I don’t know what rock I’ve been under, but there are some seriously cool fonts to be had at UK type foundry, Colophon. And for an extra twist all the of the typefaces are limited edition which I’ve never heard of in font-land before. Knowing just how much intense technical detail goes into each letter, and then to make the whole batch limited edition makes them all the more special. Colophon also spends a lot of love on the sample books for each face, they are works of art in their own right.

And the fonts themselves? For the most part they’re simple and timeless, but with enough flair to make them unique. Want, want them ALL. Check ‘em out!

- Margot

October 28, 2011 / By

Herzog & de Meuron’s VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Herzog & de Meuron's VitraHaus, photographed by Gaëtan Rossier

Constructed between 2007-2010, Herzog & de Meuron‘s VitraHaus is certainly a striking building. Located in Weil am Rhein, Germany; the building is an impressive design showroom for the Swiss furniture manufactures Vitra. The five-storey building is made up of five stacked volumes, and it can be found on the north-side of the Vitra Campus, close to Frank Gehry’s Vitra Design Museum (1989) and Tadao Ando’s Congress Hall (1993).

Architecturally, it looks like a fascinating building. From the images I’ve seen, it appears to be physically striking while also maintaining it’s key role as an effective showroom space on the inside. Recently I discovered some excellent images of the building by the Swiss photographer Gaëtan Rossier. Rossier has a great eye which I feel really complements the sensibilities of both Vitra and the architects Herzog & de Meuron. A selection of Rossier’s images can be seen above and the complete set can be viewed online here.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

October 27, 2011 / By

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