Visions of Thanksgiving by Lisa Hanawalt

Visions of Thanksgiving by Lisa Hanawalt

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Thanksgiving is only a couple days away now, so I thought it would be quite appropriate to post this vision of Thanksgiving by Lisa Hanawalt. She’s taken the familiar Thanksgiving traditions and skewed them a bit (that’s probably an understatement). My favorite of the bunch is definitely ‘bottom turkey’, or using your unpaid bills as stuffing. I can only hope my Thanksgiving is half as entertaining.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

November 22, 2011 / By

The playful illustrations (and plush dudes) of Jay Cover

The playful illustrations of Jay Cover

The playful illustrations of Jay Cover

The playful illustrations of Jay Cover

I feel like there’s a very distinct British style going around these days. This style is embodied by a looseness of stroke, a care-free attitude about what the person is creating. It’s not necessarily beautiful, but it’s certainly interesting and has a lot of character, which makes the work quite charming and enjoyable to look at. I’d definitely say that Jay Cover is a part of this British style.

His quirky and fun “dudes” at top were the first thing to grab my attention. I think they’re foxes, as he uses a lot of foxes in his work in general. I also liked his work revolving around funny statements like “Look for hidden gems”, which honestly sounds like something I might say myself. Finally, I thought his editorial work was also really strong, as you can see in the last image. His sense of color is spot on and it shows in that piece particularly well.

I’d suggest checking out not only his personal website, but his Flickr as well, where he has a lot more work at a larger size.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

November 22, 2011 / By

Peter Jellitsch draws the wind

Peter Jellitsch STB series Wind Algorithm

Peter Jellitsch STB series Wind Algorithm

Peter Jellitsch STB series Wind Algorithm

Peter Jellitsch (kind of) draws the wind. Which is hard. Maybe you’ve seen pretty terrible representations of the wind in sections meant to illustrate cross-ventilation or in animations of how fans work, but these are better. What Jellitsch actually does is use wind analysis software to generates these fluid surfaces that he renders by hand. In his own words:

“‘The hand drawing’ is an essential part of my work. It allows me a physical acquisition of invisible digital calculatory work and includes, of course, mistakes and instinctive extension.”

What’s remarkable about these drawings, to me, is how such a simple drawing technique can achieve such visual depth. Essentially these drawings are a kind of hatching, but bear almost no resemblance to the hatching patterns that fill cross sections to¬†delineate¬†what is concrete or what is brick. This is the wind, and in tall buildings that use this kind of software analysis, the lateral forces from wind can become as important as gravity.

Alex

Alex Dent

November 22, 2011 / By

Time Twister – Hans Andersson’s LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

I’ve a lot of love for LEGO, and so when I saw Swedish programmer Hans Andersson‘s Time Twister clock I just knew I’d have to share it. His creation is noisy, slow and indeed the epitome of chunkiness, and yet it’s a beautiful creation.

For me, the raw simplicity of Andersson’s design is really attractive and the way in which his creation goes about slowly-revealing each of it’s digits is almost hypnotic. When I watched the video above, showing his design in motion, I was shocked at how much anticipation and excitement I felt just simply watching the time being revealed.

Hans has also built some other amazing creation including two puzzle-solving robots which are pretty incredible. One can solve sudokus and an other one can solve a rubik’s cube. Both are well worth checking out.

Via Incredible Things

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 22, 2011 / By

The Shrine / An Argument – A beautiful, new short from Sean Pecknold

The Shrine / An Argument - A beautiful, new short from Sean Pecknold

The Shrine / An Argument - A beautiful, new short from Sean Pecknold

The Shrine / An Argument - A beautiful, new short from Sean Pecknold

As I was thinking of ways to write up this post, I couldn’t decide if this was a new music video for Fleet Foxes, or a piece of video art masterminded by Sean Pecknold. I think in fact, it’s a bit of both, but either way it’s something amazing.

The video was directed, animated and edited by Sean Pecknold, who we’ve featured on the site numerous times, who has to be one of my favorite creatives around these days. He has an really unique vision and creative output, and each time he gets better and better. The video utilizes the art of Stacey Rozich, a Seattle based illustrator and designer who’s work is used to perfection in this video. I was surprised to see Stacey’s work in the video, it’s so bold and graphic, but she seems tailor made for this project.

The story in the video is… odd. I couldn’t tell you what it means, honestly. Maybe the deer is a bully and needs to stop being such an a-hole and killing things? I’m not sure, but it’s so well done, and the music is so good, that it really doesn’t matter to me.

I love that Robin Pecknold, the singer in Fleet Foxes, let his brother Sean go nuts with their videos, and clearly, it pays off. The video was released yesterday and it already has 85k pageviews. So when does Sean Pecknold move to become the next Spike Jonze or Michel Gondry? In my opinion, not soon enough.

Bobby

Music: Fleet Foxes
Album: Helplessness Blues
Director: Sean Pecknold
Animators: Sean Pecknold & Britta Johnson
Character Illustrations: Stacey Rozich
Art Assistant: Natalie Jenkins
Producer: Aaron Ball
Multiplane: Greg Pecknold
Post/Edit : Sean Pecknold
AE Assist: Austin Wilson
Sound FX: Shervin Shaeri
Labels: Bella Union & Sub Pop
Made in Portland, Oregon

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

November 22, 2011 / By

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