Andrew Holder Interview On Los Angeles, I’m Yours

Andrew Holder Interview On Los Angeles, I'm Yours

Today on Los Angeles, I’m Yours, we have a special treat: an interview with artist Andrew Holder. Holder has been featured on The Fox Is Black quite a few times and is a super sweet guy, living in a nice little house in Eagle Rock. We spoke with him about his work and inspirations, how Art Center in Pasadena is the reason he is in the city, and how surfing in Los Angeles isn’t very good. Be sure to check it out and, if the interview doesn’t sell you, he also wanted to climb up a tree for his portrait (which ended up being super rad). You can read the story here.

KYLE FITZPATRICK

January 30, 2012 / By

Recommended: Dimlite’s new album ‘Grimm Reality’

Dimlite's new album 'Grimm Reality'

Recommended: Dimlite's new album 'Grimm Reality'

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

I don’t remember how I came across Dimlite’s new album Grimm Reality, but I’m certainly happy I did. The songs he’s produced for this record feel like they’re influenced heavily by the past, bits of jazz and hip-hop, weird guitar rock, experimentations with sound. And though that could be a hot mess, somehow Dimlite makes it all work in on chaotic yet cohesive mess. I’m usually shit at describing music, so here’s what Stones Throw had to say:

Titling his third album Grimm Reality might seem to point to a new autobiographical streak in this Swiss musician, but that would be too simple. It’s up to the listener to piece together a version of Grimm’s reality from mere hints: the wistful romance of “XY,” the tension and release of “New, Better Pain” and soon through every perfectly poised moment on this record. Likewise, looking for the remains of a hip-hop influence, or a connection to what’s happening on modern-day dance floors, won’t yield much here. The precedents that spring to mind are all cherished outsiders – Neu, The Residents, Beefheart, Philip Glass – footnotes in mainstream music history but, in an altogether preferable parallel universe, titans of the recent past.

It’s the swirling mixture of sounds that really give the album it’s character. I’ve been listening to the new album from RareBit (who’s track we posted last week) and it’s got a similar sound, if that’s even possible. It’s this melange of styles and historical sounds that are weaved together to create a new, cohesive something. I’d definitely recommend picking up this album if you like what you hear in the track above, titled XY.

Bobby Solomon

January 30, 2012 / By

Work Drugs Cover Adele’s ‘Rolling in the Deep’

Work Drugs

Over the weekend I discovered the music of Philadelphia natives Work Drugs. Last year, the band played support to Two Door Cinema Club during their North American tour, and during that time, they listened to a lot of Adele. After traveling 8,000 miles with little more then Adele’s album for company, the band aptly decided to pay tribute to the English singer by covering her track Rolling in the Deep.

I really like what they do to the song – stripping it back until it’s barely recognizable and then feeding it through a filter of their own unique smooth-fi sound. I think it works really well and it’s nice to hear such a fresh take on a track that has seen a lot of covers and remixes over the past few months. Make sure to check out more music from Work Drugs here on their Bandcamp page.

Philip Kennedy

January 30, 2012 / By

The fragility of efficiency: Tensegrity lights by Michal Maciej Bartosik

The fragility of efficiency: Tensegrity lights by Michal Maciej Bartosik

The fragility of efficiency: Tensegrity lights by Michal Maciej Bartosik

A few years ago, I came across a photo of a lighting system designed by Michal Maciej Bartosik, although I didn’t know it at the time because the photo was uncredited. “Who did this?” I didn’t figure it out then, but the smart use of fluorescent tubes as structural components in a glowing dome stuck with me. Years later, I’m happy to have figured out who made it, and just how talented he is. Michal Maciej Bartosik studied architecture (and now lives) in Canada. A newer light sculpture/structure of his employs a structural principle popularized by Buckminster Fuller: Tensegrity.

Tensegrity has always made me a little nervous. It’s a very efficient way to hold something up, but there’s no redundancy: every member of the structure is critical to keep the structure standing. If a single cable snaps, it can cause the whole structure to collapse. So while I think these light sculptures are amazing, I have a hard time figuring out what happens when one of the tubes burns out.

Alex Dent

January 30, 2012 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Denise Nouvion: Day 5

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Denise Nouvion: Day 5

Denise Nouvion: Day 5

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

We’ve reached the end of our beautiful ride with Denise Nouvion and her lovely photos, but I have an extra surprise in store. Along with her final wallpaper, a beautiful image of a polaroid of a bike, we have a brand new track to preview from her the band she’s in, Memoryhouse. Pretty cool, if you ask me. I want to give a huge thanks to Denise for working with me on this. I think her images are lovely and I’m so happy they’ve been added to our pool of creative desktops.

You can click here to see the other days:
Denise Nouvion: Day 1
Denise Nouvion: Day 2
Denise Nouvion: Day 3
Denise Nouvion: Day 4

Bobby Solomon

January 27, 2012 / By

Google+