The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda

The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda

Jolby

The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda

Frank Chimero

One of my earliest childhood memories is going to a birthday party of friend and playing Legend of Zelda, mystified by what the hell you were supposed to do. In my young brain it all looked the same, until suddenly a rock was moved and the main character was taken into a dungeon where danger lurked around every corner. I think it’s these same memories that spurred Portland designers Always With Honor (who designed my fantastic black fox logo) and Jolby to curate an art show called Triforce Tribute.

The show opens on Friday, March 9 and runs until April 21 at the Land Gallery, featuring over 30 artists, many of them my friends and favorites. I sent AWH and Jolby some questions about the show, here’s what they had to say.

1) What spurred you and Jolby to get together and organize the Triforce Tribute?

The Triforce Tribute came to be mostly as an excuse to make some Zelda-themed work. We had joked about curating a show for a while, but weren’t sure there would be much interest outside of ourselves.

2) You have over 30 artists in the show, all creating original art. Was it difficult to find so many people?

Initially we were a bit concerned that there wouldn’t be much interest since it’s such a specific subject matter, but the response has been nothing but positive, and we’re super happy that so many amazing people are involved.

3) Were you surprised by other people’s passion for the Legend of Zelda series?

We knew people were passionate, but have been more surprised by the amount of folks that have gotten excited about the show- it turns out there are a lot of Zelda fans out there!

4) I grew up playing the original Legend of Zelda, but what’s your personal favorite and why?

Jolby: Our favorite Zelda game is A Link to the Past for the SNES. The game (at the time) was everything you wanted in a video game; It was filled with puzzles, rich with detail and depth, it had another dimension to explore, secrets to find… it was so good. Even the songs have stuck with us over the years. Hands down our favorite title in the series.

AWH: We agree on ALTTP, it was the first game in the series we ever played so it has a special place in our hearts. It also holds up so well, it’s still just as fun to play today as it was back then.

5) Any future plans for more shows like this?

No plans at the moment, but we’ve had so much fun putting this one together it’s definitely a possibility!

They were also kind enough to send me some preview art of the show, which is both above and below. You can see the level of talent in the show is pretty huge.You can see more previews of the work from the show over on their blo by clicking here.

Also be sure to check in tomorrow, as we’ve got a special Triforce Tribute wallpaper.

The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda

Yehteh

The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda

Dan Cassaro / Young Jerks

The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda - Art by Ping Zu

Ping Zu

The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda - Art by Trevor Bassett

Trevor Bassett

The Triforce Tribute, a multi-medium show celebrating all things Zelda - Art by Jez Burrows

Jez Burrows

Bobby Solomon

February 28, 2012 / By

Wang Shu: 2012 laureate for the Pritzker Prize

Portrait of Pritzker Prize winner, Wang Shu

Wang Shu: 2012 Pritzker Laureate

Wang Shu: 2012 Pritzker Laureate

Wang Shu: 2012 Pritzker Laureate

Yesterday, the Hyatt Foundation announced Wang Shu as the 2012 laureate for the Pritzker Prize. If you’re first thought reading this is “Wait, who?!” then you’re not alone. His work is fantastic, even if it’s unfamiliar to nearly everyone outside of architecture, and unfamiliar to a sizable number of architects, too. I’ve been reading reactions to the news of his selection, trying to gauge if other folks are as surprised as I am by his recognition. It’s surprising not because his work doesn’t deserve the recognition, but because the committee selected the architectural equivalent of “a band so cool you haven’t even heard of them yet.” So here’s a few of the reactions as well as more information about Shu and his hilariously-named practice: Amateur Architecture Studio.

Christopher Hawthorne just happened to sit down to lunch with Shu this weekend in downtown LA (Shu is in town and spoke last night at UCLA) asking if Shu’s wife, Lu Wenyu, deserved to share the prize with him.

Alejandro Aravena, a member of the selection committee for the prize, wrote an eloquent essay, er talk, about Shu’s selection, describing a moving visit to a history museum designed by Shu (and his wife) in the city of Ningbo. Aravena repeats some of the points from the official announcement about the rapid development of China and Shu’s use of material reclaimed from older constructions.

Aaron Britt, from Dwell, says that Shu’s recognition may signal more awards in the future to Asian architects. Britt’s not alone, as even the press release talks about the rising importance of China:

“The fact that an architect from China has been selected by the jury, represents a significant step in acknowledging the role that China will play in the development of architectural ideals.In addition, over the coming decades China’s success at urbanization will be important to China and to the world. This urbanization, like urbanization around the world, needs to be in harmony with local needs and culture. China’s unprecedented opportunities for urban planning and design will want to be in harmony with both its long and unique traditions of the past and with its future needs for sustainable development.”

I’m not sure this means the committee will rain Pritzker medallions all over China for the foreseeable future, as it’s anyone’s guess where the prize will land next. Some of the more combative comments about Shu’s selection for the award have something do with the friction between Shu’s talent and how his selection is perceived. I would guess that folks unhappy with his selection view the prize as validation of someone’s reputation: a lifetime achievement award that cements some pre-existing reputation. In Shu’s case, the prize creates his reputation for many people. “He’s won the Pritzker Prize so he must be amazing, right?” He is, and I think his selection is appropriate even if surprising. Maybe Wang Shu is a band you haven’t heard of, but maybe you’ll like listening to it, too.

More photos of Shu’s work, and more information, on the Pritzker Foundation website.

Alex Dent

February 28, 2012 / By

‘Replicate’, a new track from Fanfarlo’s new album, ‘Rooms Filled With Light’

Rooms Filled With Light by Fanfarlo

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Yesterday morning I was happily surprised to hear a new track from Fanfarlo on KCRW. The song I heard is called Replicate, and it’s the title track from their new album, Rooms Filled With Light. It’s a pretty fantastic track to a pretty great album, even though I’ve only listened to it once through so far. The song sort of reminds me of something that Owen Pallet might write and arrange, which is a total compliment. I was a big fan of their last album, so I’m really happy to see that their sophomore effort is just as nice. Hopefully they play some small venue here in Los Angeles before they perform at Coachello.

On a side note, does anyone know who took the cover photo above?

Bobby Solomon

February 28, 2012 / By

Record cover designs by Nathaniel Russell

Record cover designs by Nathaniel Russell

Nathaniel Russell Record Cover - Ruthann Friedman, White Dove

Indianapolis-native Nathaniel Russell is an artist with many strings to his bow. Not content with simply drawing and making prints, he also makes shirts, bags, sculptures and posters. On top of that he’s even got his own band, Birds Of America, who sound really good. Oh, and did I mention that he also designs record covers for great bands such as Port O’Brien and Vetiver? All-round he seems like a really talented chap.

His record cover designs are particularly great. His folky lettering is really nice and the way that he combines text with image feels just perfect. It’s a look which also really suits the bands he makes artwork for. Make sure to check out more of his work online by clicking here.

Philip Kennedy

February 28, 2012 / By

Craft and carpentry get their dues in this Starbucks in Fukuoka

Craft and carpentry get their dues in this Starbucks in Fukuoka

Craft and carpentry get their dues in this Starbucks in Fukuoka

Craft and carpentry get their dues in this Starbucks in Fukuoka

It always a happy surprise when a large mega-brand gets it right, so I have to give props to Starbucks for this one. The cafe is located in Fukuoka, on the grounds of the Dazaifu Tenmagu, a Shinto shrine complex. Designed by Kengo Kuma, the space is filled with long, square blocks which criss-cross around the space, creating what looks like a mathematically constructed nest. It’s interesting to me, that even though the walls and ceilings are mostly covered in wooden beams, the space still seems to be rather open feeling. It would be really wonderful if Starbucks decided to take more chances like this in their other stores around the world.

Found through Architizer

Bobby Solomon

February 27, 2012 / By

Lisa Hannigan’s ‘Safe Travels (Don’t Die)’ Video by Cliona O’Flaherty & Chris Judge

Safe Travels (Don't Die) by Lisa Hannigan

Safe Travels (Don't Die) by Lisa Hannigan

Irish photographer Clíona O’Flaherty and illustrator Chris Judge recently collaborated in producing and directing a really sweet music video for the singer-songwriter Lisa Hannigan. The track is called Safe Travels and the video shows a man making his way across the country to meet with his companion. It all looks amazing and I really like the stylized feel of the imagined rural Ireland of the 1950′s and 60′s.

The central character is adorable and I’m particularly taken by how successful the collaboration is at combining the warmth and beauty of Clíona’s photography with the wit and whimsy of Chris’s illustrations. It just works really well! They’re a perfect duo and I’d love to see more work from them in the future.

Safe Travels is taken from Lisa Hannigan’s album Passenger.

Philip Kennedy

February 27, 2012 / By

A refreshing Windows UI concept design by Sputnik8

A refreshing Windows UI concept design by Sputnik8

A refreshing Windows UI concept design by Sputnik8

A refreshing Windows UI concept design by Sputnik8

Microsoft has been doing some really interesting things with UI design lately, especially with the Windows Mobile UI in their new phones. So far though, they haven’t quite hit a home-run with their desktop experience, even though it may not be around for much longer. When I came across this UI concept from Sputnik8 I thought it was a really great idea and pretty nicely executed.

I haven’t soaked in all the details and minutia of the design yet, but from a purely aesthetic viewpoint, I think he’s right on point. The Windows Mobile design is nice and flat with big chunks of text, and Sputnik8 has done a great job of carrying this theme over to a desktop experience. It’s also nice to see that the UI is rather tap-able, so perhaps the UI could even be used for a touchable desktop experience, a path that technology is certainly heading down.

You should really go visit the Forum page he created over on The Verge where he’s received a ton of amazing and well deserved feedback.

Found through iA

Bobby Solomon

February 27, 2012 / By

Plants, Gnomes and Parking Spots – MEI’s wonderful parking structure

Block 11 Parking Structure by MEI Architecture

Block 11 Parking Structure by MEI Architecture

Block 11 Parking Structure by MEI Architecture

It might sound strange to say that parking garages can be wonderful things, but this parking garage certainly seems wonderful. Designed by MEI, this particular parking structure lives in Almere, a city in the Netherlands with an embarrassingly long list of remarkable structures. What’s wonderful about a parking garage? For starters, garages reduce the footprint that parking stomps into cities. Land that would otherwise become a desert of asphalt and empty cars can become something better, even if it’s just a patch of grass. Folks in warmer climates will appreciate the shade that garages provide, and folks in colder climates can appreciate shelter from the snow.

But parking garages are ugly. Many parking garages wear a sad kind of camouflage: some to disguise their sloping floors and others to obscure their function. This garage in Almere is the first I’ve ever seen with a pattern of garden gnomes on the exterior.  I guess the gnomes are there to look after the plants that protrude from the facade. Besides being one of the funnier parking garages, the skin has a diaphanous quality that almost makes the entire thing elegant. So I hope you can agree that even if this structure isn’t exactly elegant, it is at least wonderful.

Found through Contemporist

Alex Dent

February 27, 2012 / By

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