An annual report you’d want to keep by Matt Chase

An annual report you'd want to keep by Matt Chase

An annual report you'd want to keep by Matt Chase

An annual report you'd want to keep by Matt Chase

I’ve been a fan of Matt Chase since his widely publicized rebrand of the U.S. Postal Service, but it was his annual report for the University of Virgnia Library which I thought I’d share. I’d say that there is a subtle change in reports. Most companies and institutions are starting to realize that they communicate their brand goals with these commonly stodgy reports. What Matt has created is both informational and fun at the same time. His use of images, color and type blend create a project that feels contemporary while managing to include things you’d actually dig up in a library.

You can see more photos by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

March 30, 2012 / By

Kaap Skil Maritime and Beachcombers Museum by Mecanoo

Kaap Skil, Maritime and Beachcombers Museum by Mecanoo Architecten

Kaap Skil, Maritime and Beachcombers Museum by Mecanoo Architecten

Kaap Skil, Maritime and Beachcombers Museum by Mecanoo Architecten

This is the new entrance and exhibition space of Kaap Skil, Maritime and Beachcombers Museum designed by Mecanoo Architecten. Recently opened on the Dutch island of Textel, the playful, gabled volume greets visitors to the museum which highlights artifacts from the “Dutch Golden Age” when Texel was the departure point of vessels in the Dutch East India Company fleet. Four hundred years ago, sailors and businessmen set sail in search of spices

The exterior of the project is finished with vertical strips wood repurposed from a nearby canal. From the project’s interior, the vertical louvers filter views outward and cast long, striped shadows on the museum’s surfaces.  The fins run up to meet the project’s jaunty roofline, which may seem like an irrational flourish but the gables help tie the project to the surrounding buildings. Both details help reinforce the identity of the museum as references to water.  In the case of the roofline we have the abstract form of a wave and the facade is more like driftwood- something found and repurposed.

Alex Dent

March 30, 2012 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Space Suit of the Week - Lado Alexi

Space Suit of the Week - Lado Alexi

Space Suit of the Week - Lado Alexi

The photos of Lado Alexi are filled with sexy, fashionable people, but clearly he also has a soft spot for space suits. He took the spacesuit, something that’s decidedly not sexy, something made for protecting the human body from the extreme temperatures and vacuum of space, and turns it into something mysterious and sensual. The model almost appears to be protecting herself with the suit, the last photo looking like she’s preparing to suit up. The colors are also pretty fantastic, they almost look like something from an old pulp comic book. Be sure to check out the rest of his work as well, he’s got a great eye.

Bobby Solomon

March 30, 2012 / By

Immateriality as material: Visualizing the unseen aspects of our world

Immateriality as material: Visualizing electromagnetic fields full of data

Immateriality as material: Visualizing electromagnetic fields full of data

Immateriality as material: Visualizing electromagnetic fields full of data

Data is beginning to flow from of everywhere these days. As mobile devices continue to spread we’ve slowly and steadily begun mapping our world, through our own eyes. We’ve got geotagging and image sharing networks, but what about the stuff we can’t see, abstract things like electromagnetic fields? Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby have taken this idea and created these beautiful visualizations, which are like spatial holograms of bubbling information. I find the idea of visualizing things we can’t see an extremely interesting field. It’s like when you see maps of wind currents, we know it’s there but you can’t quite see it. There’s also the idea of emotional cartography, a term I think that was coined by Christian Nold, which can tell you things like the emotional states of people in a certain geographic area.

For the last 2000 years we’re a people who’ve relied upon geographical maps to determine our next location, but what if that changes in the next 100 years? What if instead you navigate based on your personal interests? We’re soon approaching a breakdown between the physical and digital worlds, so much so that I think one day we may have to come up with a new word for it all. It’s fun to dream up potentials for the future, and important to start making them reality.

Bobby Solomon

March 30, 2012 / By

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