A Crematorium in Lithuania by Architektu Biuras G.Natkevicius ir Partneriai

A Crematorium in Lithuania designed by Architektu Biuras G.Natkevicius ir Partneriai

A Crematorium in Lithuania designed by Architektu Biuras G.Natkevicius ir Partneriai

A Crematorium in Lithuania designed by Architektu Biuras G.Natkevicius ir Partneriai

Even though I don’t want to be be buried, or die anytime soon, I’ve spent an embarrassing amount of time sketching what I’d want my grave to look like. I don’t want to be buried though, so it’s more likely that I’ll be found toe-up in a vat of formaldehyde, medical students picking me apart until there’s nothing left. What’s most likely is that I’ll be cremated after I die, no frills or education involved. It has never occurred to me think about where I’d want to be cremated until after seeing images of this Crematorium in Lithuania designed by Architektu Biuras G.Natkevicius ir Partneriai.

There’s a distinct attitude about this crematorium: it’s very visible. The windows are expressive and almost look like confetti strewn across concrete walls. It’s easy to want to hide crematoriums because they can be morbid places that we’d rather not think about, but these places can also mean more. Maybe shopping for a crematorium isn’t so far fetched, but by the time I end up in one I really won’t care. It won’t be about me, but my friends and family, and what they want to do. So if it’s two hundred years from now, and you’re a relative of mine and wondering what to do with my body: figure out if they’ve built something like this in Hawaii and go there.

This particular crematorium is the only crematorium in Lithuania. It was realized in spite of opposition by deep-seated religious traditionalists, so it may not be too surprising that it’s in a strange part of town, surrounded by factories and industrial plants instead of green space with actual plants. The project is introverted, in part, to shield visitors from the context, but also to minimize distractions for visitors. One curious detail about this project, and it’s context, is that even though it is surrounded by sugar mills and fertilizer factors with tall chimney stacks, the architects intentionally kept the chimney of the crematorium as small and out of sight as possible; they didn’t want the sight of the chimney to cause bad feelings.

Found through Dezeen

Alex Dent

March 28, 2012 / By

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