The weird and wonderful sounds of ‘Noisy Jelly’

Noisy Jelly

Noisy Jelly

‘Noisy Jelly’ is an amazing prototype project created by two students at Paris’s ‘L’Ensci Les Ateliers’Raphaël Pluvinage and Marianne Cauvard. The project works as a game – asking players to make and mould their own unique colored shapes out of jelly. Once the jelly has set it becomes a unique musical instrument unlike anything I’ve seen before. The video above shows exactly how the project works and the finished result really is fantastic looking. Pluvinage and Cauvard are also quick to add that there is absolutely no sound editing in the video – what you see is what you get!

Working on parts of Arduino and Max/Msp, the prototype uses a combination of elements to define the sounds that it creates. From the wiggling of the jelly, to the natural pressure sensitivity of it, and the vibrations of the finger – ‘Noisy Jelly’ combines these elements to create a spectrum of sounds which perfectly suits the oddness of Jelly. It’s a fantastic concept and one which I can imagine kids of all ages would love. Hopefully this project moves on from just being a prototype and someday soon becomes a reality.

Philip Kennedy

April 30, 2012 / By

Super cute paintings by Chiao Ling Lo

Super cute paintings by Chiao Ling Lo

Super cute paintings by Chiao Ling Lo

Can’t remember how I came across the work of Chiao Ling Lo, but there’s something extremely charming her art. Her work is reminiscent of Nara, though really only in content and feeling, not so much in her style. Her work is mostly children, or pop icons who look like the manga cherubs. I love all the details in her work, the things that let you know she did these by hand like the hair of the girl in the image at the top right.

Of course I’m also a big fan of the colors she uses. The brighter the better. Unfortunately I couldn’t dig up more about her, it seems like she only has her Flickr. If you know anything else about her please shoot me an email/tweet/FB.

Update: Here’s more information about Chiao from a TFIB reader named Grace:

I stumbled upon your latest post on The Fox Is Black. I don’t really know this artist personally, but I happened to know some information about her via my friend. The artist’s name is actually Chiao Ling Lo. Lo is her last name. She graduated from Taipei National University of the Arts, and currently runs a design studio with her husband. I’m very glad that artists from Taiwan could gain your notice. Enclosed is their studio’s website and facebook page.

http://dxa.tw/
https://www.facebook.com/dxatw

Bobby Solomon

April 29, 2012 / By

Incredible poster for ‘E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial’ by Dan McCarthy

Incredible poster for 'E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial' by Dan McCarthy

The good folks at Alamo Drafthouse and Mondo have teamed up for Summer of 1982, celebrating the best summer of movies ever. You’ve probably heard of Alamo Drafthouse, the Austin based cinema whpo shows classic films and makes stunning posters for them. Same thing here, only this around Dan McCarthy has done an incredible job of capturing the awe of Steven Spielberg’s E.T. I’m not even a huge fan of the film but that’s got to be one of the finest illustrations I’ve seen in a while.

You can get a ton of information about the Summer of 1982 by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

April 29, 2012 / By

Current Reading – Fantastic Man, Mark, Apartamento, Day Job Magazine

Weekend Reading

Fantastic Man / $14.95
The Spring/Summer 2012 issue turned out to be a really good one. They’ve got a surprising interview with Perry Chen, found of Kickstarter, a short conversation with Jean Touitou, the man behind APC who’s always an interesting character, as well as a fashion spread that was shot in Palm Springs. Rounding things out is a wonderful interview with Piet Oudulf, the man responsible for the plants that adorn the High Line.

Mark / $19.95
Mark is always a good read, as well as having some of the best editorial layout around. There’s a nice piece on Sou Fujimoto’s House NA (which we previously covered here) though Im still not sure where the bathroom is. They also have a look at apps for architects, I’ve become smitten with the Grünerløkka Apartments in Oslo, and they focus on the use of light in architecture, like a house where all the windows are on the ceiling.

Apartamento / $19.95
I’m a big fan of Apartmento, no one does it quite like they do. I snagged a copy while I was at Ooga Booga yesterday, so I’ve briefly looked through but haven’t dived in yet. I saw that one story had photos by Wolfgang Tillman, so that’s pretty rad. There’s also a conversation about the perfumication of products, as in all products will one day have their own unique scent, certainly interesting to think about.

Day Job Magazine / $25
I received a special, #0 sneak peak of the first issue of Day Job and I’m really enjoying the idea and execution. Based out of Brooklyn, the magazine is simply about jobs.

Day Job is a publication for anyone who has ever had a job they’ve loved, a job they’ve hated, a life-long calling or a way to make an easy buck. In short, it’s about work, a celebration of the everyday ways in which we spend our time and energy. As the inimitable Studs Terkel describes working, “It’s about a search, too, for daily meaning as well as daily bread, for recognition as well as cash.”

The also have funs sections like Lunch Break, which are recipes for making a great lunch, as well as local street vendors in New York. The aesthetics of it all feel great, and it’s a really smart idea. You can help Day Job get off it’s feet by investing in their Kickstarter. I’m about to donate as soon as I post and share this.

Bobby Solomon

April 29, 2012 / By

Interims Audimax, a temporary lecture hall designed by Deubzer Konig and Rimmel Architekten

Interims Audimax, a temporary lecture hall designed by Deubzer Konig and Rimmel Architekten

Interims Audimax, a temporary lecture hall designed by Deubzer Konig and Rimmel Architekten

Interims Audimax, a temporary lecture hall designed by Deubzer Konig and Rimmel Architekten

Interims Audimax, a temporary lecture hall designed by Deubzer Konig and Rimmel Architekten

These are pictures of a temporary lecture hall built on the campus of Technische Universitat Muchen by Deubzer Konig Rimmel Architekten. The temporary structure is built using mostly wood (including the undulating facade) and is expected to last anywhere from one decade to two. The timescale of the project may surprise you: the project was designed and built in nine months. Inside the project, there are plenty of other surprises: poured flooring, oriented strand board on the walls (that’s the kind of OSB more commonly found lining garage walls in the states) as well as simple but nice signage for the lecture hall seats.

Found through Contemporist

Alex Dent

April 27, 2012 / By

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