The valleys of New Zealand, photographed by Chris Sisarich

The valleys of New Zealand, photographed by Chris Sisarich

The valleys of New Zealand, photographed by Chris Sisarich

We posted about Chris Sisarich’s work late last year but I was recently re-introduced to his photographs and had to share these. They’re pictures taken of amazing looking valleys in New Zealand, which I think Chris has done a spectacular job of capturing. It is kind of funny though, because it seems like he pays his bills by shooting car advertisements for companies like Volkswagen, Ford, and Lexus. Still though, you can see that he has such a great eye for photography, no matter what the subject is.

Bobby Solomon

May 30, 2012 / By

The strange paintings of Robert Nicol

English illustrator and artist Robert Nicol is responsible for these strange paintings which I absolutely love! Painted in acrylics with washed out and dreamlike colors, his palette is in stark contrast to the oddities that lie within his work.

Looking at the images above you can see bizarre triangles rip from the ground of a quite landscape or witness a hatted man spring from a hole and hold a group of people at gun point. It’s a strange world which he creates with his brush but it really is quite wonderful and beautiful in its own unique way. Go see more of what he does online here.

Philip Kennedy

May 30, 2012 / By

Youth Center of Qingpu, designed by Atelier Deshaus

Youth Center of Qingpu designed by architects Atelier Deshaus

Youth Center of Qingpu designed by architects Atelier Deshaus

Youth Center of Qingpu designed by architects Atelier Deshaus

Youth Center of Qingpu designed by architects Atelier Deshaus

These are images of the Youth Center in Qingpu designed by Atelier Deshaus. You may remember that we shared a Kindergarden in Jiading that the firm designed a few months ago, or maybe this is your first time seeing the diaphanous and boxy skins that mark some of the firm’s recent work. Although a single project, the mass of this project’s program is divided into smaller-scaled blocks that would read as individual buildings if it weren’t for the unifying color palette and punched-out openings. If I understand the architects’ description correctly, one of the goals of the project was to break down the behemoth size of the project to a scale more appropriate for the location and use of the project:

Whole theme is based on such idea: on the premise of adapting adjacent urban scale, a small inner public space of human scale will be created in order to reconstruct the memory of traditional townscape scale.

In this case, the unifying color palette and repeated formal gestures undermine the architect’s goals. While their effort results in a pristine series of alluring photographs (taken by photographer Yao Li) they are photographs of a place that still looks monolithic. The series of outdoor spaces that connect elements of the building are as bright and open as the architects intended, but when rendered almost entirely in shades of white the spaces look too pristine and almost alienating. Still, what’s remarkable about this project is the decision to express the project as a series of smaller masses; to dissolve and distribute the program until it starts to resemble a small city.

Found through ArchDaily

Alex Dent

May 29, 2012 / By

The Fox Is Black is visiting New York

Taxi Cab by Kyle Lishok

Photo thanks to Kyle Lishok

The Fox Is Black and Los Angeles, I’m Yours, aka myself and Kyle, are coming to New York from June 7th till June 17th. While we’re there we’re going to be checking out the Vimeo Festival + Awards, doing a bit of work on the side, and trying to meet and see as many fun people as possible. If you’re interested in meeting up with us for a coffee or a drink or to show us what cool stuff you’re working on please let us know by emailing me at thefoxisblack *AT* gmail.

We’re also thinking about having a little get together at a bar/space/scary warehouse on Thursday, June 14th, so keep your calendar clear. If you have a space that you think might work for a fun get-together please get in touch at the email above.

We’re so excited to be headed back to New York again, it’s long overdue.

Bobby Solomon

May 29, 2012 / By

Facebook: Wallstreet 1, America 0

Facebook: Wallstreet 1, America 0

In case you have a deaf ear to the world’s biggest social networking company, on Friday, May 18, 2012, Facebook had it’s initial public offering on the NASDAQ stock exchange.

Starting at a comfortable $38, the stock took an early tumble by the end of the day as a deluge of buyers followed the major investment companies into the stock. Whether Facebook was worth $100 billion or not didn’t matter – this was as sexy as Wall Street could come outside of Armani suits and Ferragamo shoes. A web company, many believed, that could rival Google as the greatest web IPO of all time.

Naturally there seems to be a gross miscalculation in both value and necessity. The Nasdaq Exchange had “auction software problems” early on, delaying the debut, preventing a fair playing field on trading, and confused the hell out of every clueless investor. Furthermore, the IPO was supposed to be supplemented by Wall Street’s largest companies/crooks: Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Bank of America had projected a high revenue growth which would have led to massive investment from both firms. By the end of the day they had all lowered their expectations. The stock began to plummet. Regulators have stepped in and brought legal action to Morgan Stanley for possibly deceiving their customers. By tuesday the stock lost 18% of its issuing price, dropping to $31.

Continue reading this post…

Alec Rojas

May 29, 2012 / By

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