Dynamically fluid sculptures by Nick Ervinck

Dynamically fluid sculptures by Nick Ervinck

Dynamically fluid sculptures by Nick Ervinck

When I came across the work of Belgium based artist Nick Ervinck, I immediately started to think of biological masses being strung together. There’s something so organic about his work. There’s his smaller work, which look like nerve clusters being strung together in some mysterious form. Then there’s his larger pieces, like the ones you see above, which look like giant melted cheese monsters are invading your city… And I mean that in the best way possible.

A lot of different media are used by the artist such as: prints, video and digital drawings. They lead to the making of sculptural forms made of painted plaster, polyester and wood. In his digital prints and animations Nick Ervinck creates a surrealistic space by strange combinations of forms and by playing widely with volumes, proportions and colours. At least, one can say the virtual world of this artist is strange. Polymorphic, synthetic forms invade ‘seemingly’ authentic rooms, monumental buildings are detached from the ground and become living sculptures or daring combinations of ships, churches and skyscrapers float over an endless sea. This world is a fiction, constructed and deconstructed by an almighty creator. Tired of playing games by others, Nick Ervinck created his own world.

Bobby Solomon

May 25, 2012 / By

Reverse of Volume, an installation by Yasuaki Onishi (video)

Reverse of Volume, an installation by Yasuaki Onishi (video)

Reverse of Volume, an installation by Yasuaki Onishi (video)

It’s funny how our posts on TFIB tend to overlap sometimes, without actually trying. In Alex’s previous post he featured an installation with moving strings, which created an idea of space and volume with such sparse materials. The installation above is by Yasuaki Onishi, called Reverse of Volume.

In his installation, reverse of volume RG, Yasuaki Onishi uses the simplest materials — plastic sheeting and black hot glue — to create a monumental, mountainous form that appears to float in space. The process that he calls ?casting the invisible? involves draping the plastic sheeting over stacked cardboard boxes, which are then removed to leave only their impressions. This process of ?reversing? sculpture is Onishi’s meditation on the nature of the negative space, or void, left behind.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Most of the coolest shit out there is made with simple materials presented in an interesting and creative way. It’s fantastic how it looks like upside mountain ranges, with rocky crags and snow capped peaks. It would be fantastic to see this in person, though thankfully they made a video walk through of the installation as well as a time-lapse video of the set-up process, which you can view below.

Bobby Solomon

May 24, 2012 / By

David Letellier’s ‘Caten’, an installation of moving strings

David Letellier's 'Caten', an installation of moving strings

David Letellier's 'Caten', an installation of moving strings

Of all the string installations that have appeared on the site, this is the first one that moves. Artist David Letellier‘s installation Caten is housed in the Saint Sauveur chapel in Caen, France. The strings-hanging-on-strings are controlled by four motors and the entire assembly moves slowly to the resonate sounds of an abstracted hymn. David studied architecture, and in his own words: “the curves of the wires, created by the gravitational force, reflect the shapes of the church arches.”

The sound composition is inspired by the medieval solmisation prayers, especially the first verse of “Ut Queant Laxis”, also known as the “hymn to St John the Baptist”, used in the eleventh century to determine the names of the notes of the scale used in latin countries.

At each turn, the engines emit one of the first 4 notes of the scale (Ut, Re, Mi, Fa), creating a sequence of intervals, constantly reconfigured. Low frequencies resonate in the space and emphazise the transcendental character of a place once dedicated to faith.

The name is derived from the term catenary, which describes the plane curve formed by a rope hanging between two points.

Alex Dent

May 24, 2012 / By

Time Traveler or Prophet(eer) – A Film Review of Sound of My Voice

Time Traveler or Prophet(eer) – A Film Review of Sound of My Voice

Sometimes skepticism can easily be mistaken for narrow-mindedness.  Those who have accepted skepticism into the current of their daily ritual will tell you that it is systematic and functions on the belief that inquiry will always rule out over blind faith. Sound of My Voice, the collaborative brainchild of budding talents Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij, is built upon this argument, and raises the question how can we tell the difference between fact and enlightened personal experience?

Peter (Christopher Denham) and Lorna (Nicole Vicius) have a vested interest in being accepted into a secretL.A. cult that meets nightly in an undisclosed location in the valley. The target of their pursuit is Maggie (Brit Marling) the elusive female leader, who dresses as a contemporary Virgin Mary and who claims to be a prophet from the year 2054. Orchestrating a type of psychotherapy environment where the faithful abandon their individual souls to be part of the group, Maggie presents herself as savant time-traveller who has come back to bring a select few to a ‘safer’ place. Wanting to expose Maggie as a fraud and con-artist through a DIY documentary film, Peter and Lorna immerse themselves into this ritualistic cult life. As the couple falls deeper into Maggie’s hypnotic trance-like hold, a shift occurs and those who are traditionally governed by reason and logic begin to question if they are on the right side.

Premièring at the 2011 Sundance film festival, Sound of My Voice, has received well deserved critical acclaim and has since, gained momentum as a leading film in the genre of sci-fi realism. Parallels can be drawn between Sound of My Voice and Another Earth, which also premièred at Sundance the same year. The two films not only share their main star, Marling, but also a comparable mental state of disconnection and anxiety over the inevitable, i.e the future and how we all fit into it.

The beauty of Sound of My Voice is its ability to remain thrilling in the face of ambiguity. Events transpire, and our faith as viewers is tested, as it employs an intentional disregard for dramatic irony. The greatest thrill would come for those who delve into Sound of My Voice knowing little about the plot, but who are open to experience a film that questions blind faith, loyalty and awareness. In addition to the trailer, the first 12 minutes of the film are also by clicking here.

Christina Stimpson

May 24, 2012 / By

‘A Brief History Of John Baldessari’, narrated by Tom Waits

'A Brief History Of John Baldessari' featuring Tom Waits

'A Brief History Of John Baldessari' featuring Tom Waits

A Brief History Of John Baldessari is a fantastic short documentary that looks at the life and works of the American conceptual artist John Baldessari. Commissioned by LACMA for their first annual “Art + Film Gala”, the film is narrated by Tom Waits and directed by Catfish directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman.

Despite having a running time of just a little under six minutes, the film still manages to capture so much of Baldessari’s life, work and personality. It’s a documentary which is filled with quick edits, a frenzied pace and a wonderful dry sense of humour which bounces back and forth between Waits’ narration and Baldessari in his studio. It reminds me a lot of the snappy pictorial montages seen in Mike Mills’s ‘Beginners’ and I think it’s a storytelling technique which works really well in this context. Hopefully the LACMA’s Art + Film Gala goes on to be an annual event and we get to see many more great films like this in the future.

Philip Kennedy

May 24, 2012 / By

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