Origami Building by Manuelle Gautrand

Origami Building by Manuelle Gautrand

Origami Building by Manuelle Gautrand

Origami Building by Manuelle Gautrand

If marble is cut into thin enough slices, it becomes a beautiful kind of translucent window pane. There are plenty of structures that use marble this way– examples range from Byzantine architecture in Ravenna, Italy all the way to modern architecture in New Haven, Connecticut. And what looks like marble in the images above, is actually screen printed glass that folds as it sprawls sprawls across the facade of the Origami Office Building. The project was designed by Manuelle Gautrand and is located near the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.

Origami Building by Manuelle Gautrand

The pleats of pretend marble that animate the facade of this project are not created equal. The folds toward the middle of the building are deeper, allowing the pleats to flatten out toward the edges of the facade where the buildings meets its neighbors. It’s a subtle move to create urban continuity in the midst of a facade that seems to be breaking away from its neighbors through the use of glazing technology… even if that technology looks like something as old as marble.

Alex Dent

August 29, 2012 / By

Province Design Studio creates a luxurious brand for new Russian clothier Anna & Marie

Anna & Maria branding by Province Design Studio

Anna & Maria branding by Province Design Studio

Anna & Maria branding by Province Design Studio

Anna & Maria branding by Province Design Studio

The folks at Province Design Studio recently undertook the job of creating the branding for a new Russian premium and luxury clothing brand called Anna & Maria.

The approved concept of the logo and identity was built on the saying “like mother, like daughter”, or alternatively “where theres an apple on theground, there must be an apple tree around”. Many generations of womenhave been brought up on this concept. The apple symbolizes the touching motherand daughter relationship, continuity and adherence to tradition. It alsocreates a variety of associations such as beauty, temptation, seduction, etc. Anna& Marinas target audience is represented by women of different styles andways of life, nature and origin like the different varieties of apples, yetrelated through the main female values: motherhood, recognition, passion, love, wealth. This concept was embodied not only in the icon design, but also in theelements of the branded pattern and heraldry.

Anna & Maria branding by Province Design Studio

The level of depth that went into this branding project is so above and beyond. Province did an amazing job of thinking out all the minute details – from buttons to tissue paper – and it’s all perfect. It’s definitely feels like it can compete with major high-end brands but still has an approachability to it that doesn’t make it feel out of reach for a consumer. This is how you make a brand feel cohesive.

Bobby Solomon

August 29, 2012 / By

Charming picture-book illustrations by Gaia Bordicchia

Gaia Bordicchia is a children’s book illustrator based in Italy. Her images are sweet and charming and I particularly love the subtle textures that run through her work.

This year has been a particularly great year for Gaia with the release of two picture books. The first is ‘La Piccola Fiammiferaia’, an Italian adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s ‘The Little Match Girl; the second is ‘Tartarin de Tarascon’, an adaptation of Tartarin of Tarascon. Both books look really beautiful (some images from them are pictured above) and I’m sure they’re a joy to read. You can see more examples of Gaia’s work online here.

Philip Kennedy

August 28, 2012 / By

Following the sun: The Endesa Pavilion designed by IAAC

 Endesa Pavilion designed by IAAC Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalona

 Endesa Pavilion designed by IAAC Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalona

 Endesa Pavilion designed by IAAC Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalona

 Endesa Pavilion designed by IAAC Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalona

Plywood wedges dominate the exterior walls of the Endesa Pavilion, a demonstration of environmental and fabrication technology built by the Institue for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia as part of the Smart City Expo. The most glaring design feature of the pavilion, these wedges overshadow the windows of the pavilion and adjust to track the angle of the sun on the southern face of the project. The pavilion is only a temporary resident of Barcelona, and will live along the Olympic Port for a year.

Alex Dent

August 28, 2012 / By

i-D interviews Stephen Powers in anticipation of his upcoming show

Stephen Powers

Stephen Powers

Starting September 6 Stephen Powers will have a brand new show at the Joshua Liner Gallery, featuring a gallery of enamel on aluminum works which look really amazing. In conjunction, i-D magazine interviewed Stephen about the show, his thoughts on street art today, and the slow rise of the sign painter.

In your ESPO days you targeted shops that appeared to be out of business and grates that were already heavily vandalised and described it as a public service, do you feel your work still acts in this way?

I like going where the blight is, wherever it is. That’s been a constant since 1984. I like making a place better with my markings. Sometimes all you need to improve a situation is a can of flat black spray paint.

Bobby Solomon

August 28, 2012 / By

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