‘Impossible Soul’ by Sufjan Stevens

Sufjan Stevens

Back in 1968 The Beatles recorded a little song called Happiness Is A Warm Gun. It was three different songs combined together as one by John Lennon, becoming a classic for a it’s disjointed and fragmented feeling. Cut to 1997 where Radiohead records a litte song called Paranoid Android. The song is clearly influenced by Happiness is a Warm Gun, though it has four parts total with three different moods. Yet the disjointed yet abridged feeling of Paranoid Android also makes it a hit. So what if someone were to create a track with let’s say, eight different parts?

That’s exactly what he did with Impossible Soul, the final track on his stunning album, The Age of Adz. Coming in at 25 and a half minutes the song covers more styles and personalities than you can imagine. When I first listened to the song I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. How was he able to make something so disparate still sound so cohesive? It’s a feat that still blows my mind, so I hope you enjoy it just as much as I do. This honestly may be the finest thing he’s ever recorded.

Bobby Solomon

September 26, 2012 / By

‘Free Love’ an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

'Free Love' an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

'Free Love' an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

'Free Love' an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

All you need is love. The Beatles knew it and so does Erik Hamline of Steady Print Co. Erik is a first-class printer based out of northeast Minneapolis and he recently sent me some goodies in a recent order I placed with him.

One of them was a simple one color print titled Free Love which I think is pretty great. As someone who’s not legally allowed to be married in my home state the message rings rather strongly for me. Fuck the haters and buy this print for $10 by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

September 25, 2012 / By

Downtown Los Angeles bridge due for an extreme makeover

Competition design for the 6th Street Viaduct in downtown LA

Competition design for the 6th Street Viaduct in downtown LA

Competition design for the 6th Street Viaduct in downtown LA

Chemistry conspires against us. We get older and our skin changes, sagging away from places it used to diligently cling to. Our hair changes, turning grey, completely disappearing, or just migrating from the top of heads down our backs. And our bones change, becoming less dense and more fragile. It turns out that chemistry also conspires against bridges; specifically, the Sixth Street Viaduct in Downtown Los Angeles. More than just chipping paint and rusting steel, the concrete used to build the bridge way back in 1932 had an unusually high alkali content. So for the past 80 years, an alkali-silica reaction has been deteriorating the bridge from the inside out. This makes the bridge especially susceptible to failure durring earthquakes so the city has decided to host a competition to replace the bridge. The three renderings above are from the finalists.

According to this World Architecture post, public reception of the three finalists was tepid: “the designs failed to capture the community’s imagination with its leaders describing all three schemes as turning their backs on the¬†neighborhood.” Without being overly critical of the schematic designs, I feel like these bridges are spanning the murky territory from flamboyant to banal. Each design seems to start with an idea about the overall form rather than starting with an idea about how to best implement a structural system at this site. And as a result, each bridge looks like it has extraneous elements. Any bridge is better than a pile of rubble in the river, when the neighborhood residents aren’t excited about any of the designs, the pile of rubble seems inevitable.

Alex Dent

September 25, 2012 / By

‘Workspaces’, an exploration into the places we make by Meggan Gould

'Workspaces', an exploration into the places we make by Meggan Gould

'Workspaces', an exploration into the places we make by Meggan Gould

'Workspaces', an exploration into the places we make by Meggan Gould

Meggan Gould is a New Mexico based photographer where she works as an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of New Mexico. Her work is mostly centered around still life photography, capturing the intimate moments of details of life. She has a beautiful series of images simply titled Workspaces which caught my eye has a browsed through them.

'Workspaces', an exploration into the places we make by Meggan Gould

'Workspaces', an exploration into the places we make by Meggan Gould

I think the success of this series is that she was able to capture such a wide variety of spaces, retaining the essence of what they are in each photo. The green house is all filled up with plants, the spinning wheel is surrounded by clumps of wool and the painter is surrounded by, well, all sorts of inspiring things to paint. Meggan’s ability to focus in the complexity or simplicity highlights not only the work being done, but the personality of the person making the work. Without even seeing the artisans behind these projects we get a sense of who these people might be.

Bobby Solomon

September 25, 2012 / By

‘All Inside’ by young English duo Bondax

Bondax

It doesn’t take much to make music nowadays. A couple of rainy days, a midi sequencer, and your choice of uppers and downers can be all it takes. To some extent, that seems to be the recipe for UK duo Bondax. George Townsend and Adam Kaye, two 17 (or maybe now 18) year olds from Lancaster, England, they have been dropping house singles for the past year or so. This track, All Inside, seems to be equal parts trip-hop, R&B, and chilled out neo-soul. More ambiance than dance, this music is for the romantic jilted generation.

Alec Rojas

September 25, 2012 / By

Great award-winning video for Rudimental’s ‘Feel the Love’

The LA Shorts Fest took place earlier this month and it saw a number of wonderfully talented folk pick up awards in a variety of categories. One such winner was director Bob Harlow who picked up first place in the Music Video category with his promo for Rudimental‘s ‘Feel the Love’.

Filmed on the streets of downtown Philadelphia, the video takes a look at the lives of members of the Fletcher Street Urban Riding Club – a youth group that has been running in the community for over 100 years. It sounds like a wonderful (and much needed) initiative and Harlow’s video gives a great insight into the lives of its members and the things they get up to. It’s pretty incredible to see horses riding through the streets of downtown Philadelphia. Congratulations to Bob Harlow on his award, the video is fantastic!

Philip Kennedy

September 24, 2012 / By

Preview ‘Until The Quiet Comes’, the new record from Flying Lotus

'Until The Quiet Comes', the new record from Flying Lotus

Earlier this morning NPR started streaming the brand new album from Flying Lotus, Until The Quiet Comes. I’m only 10 minutes in by DAMN, this is a solid record. I’m sure a lot of you will love this record that I am. Filled with great beats, atmospheric melodies and a creativity dirge of sounds that are pretty inexplicable. That sentence really meant nothing, but that’s how music writers write, right? Give it a listen below and let me know what you think on Twitter of Facebook.

Bobby Solomon

September 24, 2012 / By

The new video for Willow’s song ‘Sweater’ takes you on a one room journey

The new video for Willow's song 'Sweater' takes you on a one room journey

The new video for Willow's song 'Sweater' takes you on a one room journey

The new video for Willow's song 'Sweater' takes you on a one room journey

I’ve said it many times before, that most often the simplest projects can be the most effective ones. The video above is a shining example. If you took two walls and a floor, 3 video projectors and a treadmill, do you think you’d be able to make the music video above? It was directed by Filip Sterckx for the band Willow and their song Sweater. The song is pretty good, it reminds me of old Bloc Party, but the video itself is a massive journey.

The video starts out with a man in his bedroom as he makes his way to the beach via subway. After that things get a bit crazy as he heads under water and ends up in a hole in the middle of the earth. All of this is achieved with some walls and projectors. Pretty amazing if you ask me.

Bobby Solomon

September 24, 2012 / By

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