Mac Premo’s Dumpster Project

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

Mac Premo is an NYC-based collage artist. He has collected things for decades—things like paper pirate hats, baseball cards, action figures, unused ticket stubs, Whopper coupons and pagers. He collects these pieces of ephemera with the intention of eventually turning them into art.

So what did he do when he needed to move into a smaller studio and didn’t have room for more than 400 of those items? He certainly didn’t throw them away. Premo decided to meticulously photograph, document and write about each individual item. He then went out and bought a 30-yard dumpster and retrofitted it to be a traveling display for his collection. He calls it The Dumpster Project. The objects in Premo’s wandering gallery are carefully grouped into like categories, colors, textures and eras. They are then arranged, hung and displayed on the walls of the trash receptacle. Each item in the collection has a unique story, but it’s when they’re brought together that they begin to weave the story of a life.

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project: Mac Premo

The Dumpster Project migrates from place to place on the back of a flatbed truck. Once unloaded, visitors are invited to step inside and explore his creation of a world within a world. I saw it this weekend on Governor’s Island  where it’s on display as part of the 5th annual Governor’s Island Art Fair.

If you’re in the NYC area you should check out the Dumpster Project in person. It will be open for one last weekend on Governor’s Island this Saturday and Sunday.

September 27, 2012 / By

Buehrer Wuest Architekten build a greenhouse

Buehrer Wuest Architekten build a greenhouse in Gruningen

Buehrer Wuest Architekten build a greenhouse in Gruningen

The small Swiss village of Gruningen, at last count, boasted around 3200 villagers. Small, for sure, but also the site of  a clever new greenhouse that mimics a structural motif found in trees. The greenhouse is designed by Buehrer Wuest Arkitekten and you might be able to see in the pictures how the load-bearing columns of the new greenhouse resemble tree trunks.  Where we would expect to find branches in nature, we find steel beams in the greenhouse. The would-be trunks and branches are connected by panes of glass to enclose the greenhouse and also to create different climate zones within the greenhouse. The plants inside the small greenhouse and surrounding botanical garden may very well outnumber people in the small village, but that’s fewer folks to compete with when trying to glimpse the new steel trees.

Alex Dent

September 26, 2012 / By

Stunning new work by Markus Åkesson

Psychopomp Club, 100x150cm by Markus Akesson

The Scientist´s Room, 46x54cm by Markus Akesson

I recently discovered the work of Swedish artist Markus Åkesson. Since last month he has had an incredible looking exhibition hanging at the VIDA Museum in the small Swedish city of Borgholm. The work on display is beautiful. For me, his paintings show moments of stillness and calm, but they also have a great sense of darkness and mystery about them.

In painting’s like Psychopomp Club (The Rat) and Psychopomp club (Chicken Skeleton) (both pictured above) we get to see girls looking at animals at a natural history museum. These images seem to be about life being confronted by death in someway yet Åkesson doesn’t make these moments brash or threatening, instead the moments feel meditative, calm and even serene. There’s beauty in these moments and Åkesson captures it perfectly. More of his work can be seen online here.

New Works by Markus Åkesson currently runs at Borgholm’s VIDA Museum in Sweden until the 30th of September.

Philip Kennedy

September 26, 2012 / By

‘Impossible Soul’ by Sufjan Stevens

Sufjan Stevens

Back in 1968 The Beatles recorded a little song called Happiness Is A Warm Gun. It was three different songs combined together as one by John Lennon, becoming a classic for a it’s disjointed and fragmented feeling. Cut to 1997 where Radiohead records a litte song called Paranoid Android. The song is clearly influenced by Happiness is a Warm Gun, though it has four parts total with three different moods. Yet the disjointed yet abridged feeling of Paranoid Android also makes it a hit. So what if someone were to create a track with let’s say, eight different parts?

That’s exactly what he did with Impossible Soul, the final track on his stunning album, The Age of Adz. Coming in at 25 and a half minutes the song covers more styles and personalities than you can imagine. When I first listened to the song I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. How was he able to make something so disparate still sound so cohesive? It’s a feat that still blows my mind, so I hope you enjoy it just as much as I do. This honestly may be the finest thing he’s ever recorded.

Bobby Solomon

September 26, 2012 / By

‘Free Love’ an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

'Free Love' an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

'Free Love' an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

'Free Love' an open-minded print by Steady Print Co.

All you need is love. The Beatles knew it and so does Erik Hamline of Steady Print Co. Erik is a first-class printer based out of northeast Minneapolis and he recently sent me some goodies in a recent order I placed with him.

One of them was a simple one color print titled Free Love which I think is pretty great. As someone who’s not legally allowed to be married in my home state the message rings rather strongly for me. Fuck the haters and buy this print for $10 by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

September 25, 2012 / By

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