Great food illustrations by Nicholas John Frith

Nicholas John Frith is an illustrator, designer & printmaker from Dorset in England. While his website is packed full of great work, I think it’s his illustrations of food that I love the most.

Three of the images above come from a quirky but mouth-watering little project he used to run on his blog called Pie-day Friday. The idea was simple, Nicholas would imagine a new pie-filling every Friday and share it on his blog. Each post would be accompanied by one of these great illustration. It’s an odd little idea but I love it and I think his illustrations are great. You should go check out his portfolio while I go see if I have anything in the house to make a pie with tonight!

Philip Kennedy

December 13, 2012 / By

The Miller House Archives

MillerHouse2

The Miller House Archive

The Miller House Archive

The Miller House in Columbus, Indiana is a pretty lucky building.  Not only was the house was designed by Eero Saarinen for Irwin Miller and his wife, Xenia, but also the project has been meticulously documented and well preserved. The preservation for the house has largely been thanks to the longevity of the owners. Construction finished on the house in 1957 and the house was occupied by the couple until both died: Irwin in 2004 and Xenia in 2008. Now the house belongs to the Indianapolis Museum of Art who has continued to care for and preserve the house while opening it to the public for tours.

The museum is also making the documentation surrounding the home’s construction open to the public. Since it’s 2012 (at least for another couple of weeks) the museum has started a tumblr with hundreds of memos, sketches, letters, et cetera that all tell the story of the house taking shape.  The digital archive continues to grow and likely will grow for a while– there are over twenty thousand individual documents associated with the house that the museum now owns. And then there is the house, itself.  If you’re not familiar, the IMA has plenty of website devoted to the house. But if you’re more interested in the sometimes surprising artifacts and correspondence behind the house’s day-lit walls, the Documenting Modern Living Tumblr may be more to your liking.

Alex Dent

December 12, 2012 / By

Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters by Daniel Blackman

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

Earlier this week New York based designer Daniel Blackman relaunched his portfolio with new work and it’s looking great. One of my favorite projects that he posted was a series of posters he created for Rivendell Bicycle Works, a bike shop in Walnut Creek. The posters have two functions: To inform customers about the different styles of bikes they have as well as providing them with some sweet swag to take home if they do buy a bike.

I love these posters because of their bold imagery and their use of type. The imagery definitely does a great job of describing the bikes, like the Sam Hillborne which is a tough country bike, so of course you could venture into space and explore. I’d totally put one of these on my wall, wouldn’t you?

Bobby Solomon

December 12, 2012 / By

Intimate and Epic Photos by Trevor Triano

Trevor Triano

Trevor Triano

Trevor Triano

Trevor Triano

Trevor Triano understands scale really well. A photographer based in Aspen but often found in New York, Trevor’s work does an incredible job of showcasing the largest things in life or the most mundane in the most beautiful of ways. I think this juxtaposition can be found in the work of many but there’s something that pulls at me in Trevor’s work that makes me want to be in his photos. He has an incredible amount of work on his site, so click here to start exploring.

Bobby Solomon

December 12, 2012 / By

Zack Snyder’s ‘Man of Steel’ Trailer

Zack Snyder's 'Man of Steel' Poster

When I think of comic book movies I tend to split it in two: Marvel and DC. Marvel Comics, who was recently purchased by Disney, has had soem really huge successes in recent years with films like Iron Man and The Avengers amongst many, which truly brought comics to the mainstream. On the DC side though Christopher Nolan’s Batman series has really been the only shining star to emerge from the bunch (let’s never speak about Green Lantern ever again). So from my nerdy perspective it’ll be interesting to see how the upcoming Man of Steel fares.

Directed by Zack Snyder, Man of Steel will retell the story of Superman yet again. I’m guessing DC wasn’t happy with Bryan Singer’s 2006 attempt to revitalize the character in film. Based on what I’m seing in the trailer I’m not really sure what the point of this movie is, but I’ve always thought Superman was a tough character to nail. How do you feel anything for a man/alien with only one real weakness? Watching a movie about a perfect person who’s “misunderstood” doesn’t sound so hot. Visually the trailer is impressive, like Terrence Malick took hold of the camera and brought his touch to the world of comic books. The story is being helmed by David Goyer, writer of the Nolan’s Batman trilogy, and Nolan is attached as a producer, so there’s a lot of great potential here.

I just feel like I’ve seen this trailer before. I’ve seen this film before. How will these filmmakers really make something that excites me and tickles my funny bone like The Avengers or engage me in some masterful cinema like Batman did? I guess we’ll find out on June 14.

Bobby Solomon

December 12, 2012 / By

‘Mama Said (Sorry Mama)’ by 2veinte

I spotted this video by the Argentinian animators 2veinte and thought it was a lot of fun. I think the idea behind it is something that a lot of people can relate to, i.e. trying to do something really simple and it ending up becoming really complex in the process. 2veinte reckons that it is just simply in our nature for this to happen and they’re probably right. Fortunately, there’s something awesome in what they make and if a “more is more” philosophy every needed support this would come as a pretty great endorsement. You can check out more gifs and images from the project on their website here.

Philip Kennedy

December 12, 2012 / By

Leftovers From World’s Fairs – Photos by Jade Doskow

Jade Doskow photos of World's Fairs

Jade Doskow photos of World's Fairs

Jade Doskow photos of World's Fairs

Jade Doskow photos of World's Fairs

Even though their exhibition halls closed decades ago, there are still plenty of bits and pieces from World’s Fairs of the past to keep Jade Doskow busy. That’s because Jade photographs these remainders as part of an enormous project to document the former sites of World’s Fairs.

So far she’s been to around 50 sites, but there are dozens of sites left sprawled across five continents. What remains of the former fair sites is sometimes obvious (like the Eiffel Tower built for the 1889 World’s Fair in… where else? Paris) but sometimes it’s completely arbitrary. According to Jade: “In Philadelphia, two of the four remnants from 1876 are fair toilet buildings.” Jade’s project is not even close to being finished, but neither are some of the buildings that remain from World’s Fairs past.

Alex Dent

December 11, 2012 / By

Saul Bass Poster Sketches for Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining’

Saul Bass Poster Sketches for Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining'

Saul Bass Poster Sketches for Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining'

Saul Bass Poster Sketches for Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining'

Saul Bass Poster Sketches for Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining'

A few weeks back I went visited the Stanley Kubrick exhibit at LACMA here in Los Angeles. The show has been travelling the world so I was extremely excited to finally see it. Wandering around the exhibit is filled with so many amazing objects from the history of Kubrick’s films – things like Jack Nicholson’s type writer and the space suit from 2001.

One of the coolest parts, especially for a designer like myself, was these sketches by Saul Bass for the film poster of The Shining. Previously I had no idea that Saul Bass had created the original poster (which you can see at the top) so this was a really cool surprise. I’ve read online that Kubrick made Bass go through at least 300 versions of the poster until finally ending on the extremely alien looking version we now know.

The other gem was getting to see Saul Bass’ signature, which absolutely made me laugh. It’s the body of a bass, with Bass’ face. Too genius. You can see more of the pieces from the exhibit by clicking the images below.

Bobby Solomon

December 11, 2012 / By

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