Shane Hope “Paints” Macroscopic Nanoscapes and Makes Up Words

Shane Hope "Paints" Macroscopic Nanoscapes

Without having to crowd around a microscope, the lastest Shane Hope exhibition at the Winkleman Gallery gives all of a turn exploring the exceedingly tiny and complex architecture that hides inside our bodies. Well, sort of. Hope creates his work using molecular modeling software and a series of self-made 3-D printers. He pairs these technologies to produce these amazing but absurd assemblages of morphologies we might be more familiar with if we were either nanometers tall or histologists on an acid trip. The text for the exhibition is… a trip itself, predicting a world where we can building whatever matter we want using 3-D printers.

That world doesn’t seem far away. At this week’s Experimental Biology Conference in Boton, a company announced it has bioprinted functional liver tissue. But the world that Hope describes is murkier and more complex. When making work that is scripted, printed and appears strewn together, I guess it only makes sense to use words that are borrowed, clipped and blended together to describe his process. That’s how we end up with delightful but opaque phrases like “wreckonomical enzymin’.” But as with an assemblage of cells, there’s an underlying order just waiting to be parsed out and described. If you’d like the see the work yourself, Nano-Nonobjective-Oriented Ontographs and Qubit-Built Quilts, is on view until May 4th.

Shane Hope "Paints" Macroscopic Nanoscapes

Shane Hope "Paints" Macroscopic Nanoscapes

Alex Dent

April 26, 2013 / By

Google+