Space Suit of the Week

Space Suit of the Week - Jeremy Geddes

Space Suit of the Week - Jeremy Geddes

Space Suit of the Week - Jeremy Geddes

Space Suit of the Week - Jeremy Geddes

You may remember Jeremy Geddes, an oil painter hailing from Melbourne, Australia. His work, The Red Cosmonaut (featured at top), was recently featured on the cover of Juxtapoz magazine. The issue also features the final version of Cluster, which Alex shared a little while back.

I wanted to revisit his work and put a spotlight on his larger series of cosmonauts done in oil because I find his work rather… gravitating. Jeremy’s cosmonauts series is split; half are depicted in the familiar concrete transportation frontier, crashing to city streets or floating underneath highway overpasses while the other is shown in a soft monochromatic void. Both parts to his series feel interchangeable as if they were captured in sublime silence.

The works reminded me of  this Gemini transmission between Gemini IV Astronauts Ed White & James McDivitt after White completed NASA’s first ever spacewalk:

White: That was the most natural feeling, Jim.

McDivitt: …You looked like you were in your mother’s womb.

Safe, silent & floating.

Alana Zimmer

February 3, 2012 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Spacesuit of the Week - Afronauts by Cristina De Middel

Spacesuit of the Week - Afronauts by Cristina De Middel

Spacesuit of the Week - Afronauts by Cristina De Middel

Spacesuit of the Week - Afronauts by Cristina De Middel

Cristina De Middel is a photojournalist. Her series “Afronauts” captures the narrative of Zambia’s failed attempt to put man on the moon in a dignified, triumphant light. Her dossier reads:

“Afronauts’ is based on the documentation of an impossible dream that only lives in the pictures.”

Zambia didn’t put space boots on the moon, but these photographs show a quilted portrait of not shattered, unattained dreams, but nationalist hope and determination. There’s some published pieces out there that tries to paint Zambia’s space ambitions in the 1960’s as an absurdity. If you wish to see Zambia unattained goals in that light, I can only wonder want you think of Newt Ginrich’s ambitions for a moon colony while running for office in a country that isn’t funding lunar exploration either. We all have ambitions. Here’s to the dreamers.

Alana Zimmer

January 27, 2012 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Spaceman by David Mach

Spaceman by David Mach

I am fascinated with the domestic lifecycle of spacesuits. They’re born from the hands of women hunched over sewing machines custom fitting astronauts, and then, after a brief interlude in space, some haunt the halls of the National Air and Space Museum while most lie neatly folded somewhere deep in the Smithsonian’s archival tombs next to gowns worn by celebrities and dignitaries.

Spaceman by David Mach, like many of other sculptures, is made up of hundreds of the metal coat hangers, like the ones that come with your dry cleaning. The hangers are welded together, formed in a positive mold and then sliver nickel plated. Mach immortalizes the Apollo astronauts of soft, white plush with the same cold metal hangers that are usually kicked to the curb after their serve the purpose.

Alana Zimmer

January 20, 2012 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Spacesuit of the Week - Austrian Airspace Forum Institute Mars Prototype

The earth is not a cold dead place, hopefully Mars isn’t either. I have seen a lot of prototype suits for manned exploration of Mars (some of them are pretty funky looking) and above is my favorite. The Austrian Airspace Forum Institute created this slick silver suit and put to the test in the ice tunnels beneath the Kaunertal glacier. Among the many complications of being on Martian soil, temperatures on Mars can drop well below -100 degrees. You can read more about this space suit and the advances they’re making by clicking here.

P.S. NASA’s new Mars Science Laboratory rover, also known as Curiosity, launched in late November and is scheduled to land on Mars in early August. It’s the Presidential Hummer of rovers. Its primary mission is to assess Mars’ habitability.

Alana Zimmer

January 13, 2012 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Emily Kane has created a conceptual space advocacy group called Project Moon which explores the relationship between space industry and graphic design. The project renders a new visual aesthetic for contemporary manned space exploration. While nodding to the aesthetic and humanistic contributions to the pursuit of space, she lays out the ambiguity of the terrain ahead. The design, detailed in a palette of black, red, and periwinkle, paints out the major contributions of the past and of areas still to be further explored.

Seeing Emily’s work made me begin obsessively considering/scheming what the aesthetic of space exploration will look like in the near future. 2011 was a pretty monumental year for space: the Shuttle era ended, the International Space Station was officially completed, Earth-like planets were uncovered, commercial space exploration took huge strides and the true stellar standout – 2011 marked the 50th anniversary of human space flight. Future of space exploration is undefined and new aesthetic of space exploration is needed.

During the 1970’s and 80’s, NASA used a red logotype nicknamed the “worm”. Richard Danne and Bruce Blackburn created in their words, “a more useful new logotype” as part of the National Endowment of the Arts. It was an effort to design a more modern logo for a space agency that’s forward thinking. Then the Challenger accident happened and the agency was put on hold. In the early 90’s, administrator Daniel Goldin brought back the traditional NASA blue “meatball” with its red chevron and spattering of star in an attempt to herald back to the golden age of space exploration.

Soon manned space travel will not be limited to decorated patriots in uniform flight suits, commercial space exploration is charting new ground, including the aesthetic design of space. Virgin Galatic’s Spaceport America opened this past year; I can’t wait to see what Sir Richard Branson has up his sleeves.

Alana Zimmer

January 6, 2012 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Space Suit of the Week - Adam Devarney

Space Suit of the Week - Adam Devarney

Bon Voyage. Good luck. See ya later. Godspeed.

A spacesuit has 27 layers. Like the garments they bear, Adam Devarney’s travelers navigate through a layered patchwork of imagined narratives. Devarney’s pieces were first included in a 2010 exhibition entitled Godspeed, collaged portraits pieced together in a dream-like narrative of hallowed ghosts of aviators past, suited up for a prosperous journey ahead. The Fox is Black reader and Vermont native speaks of his process:

“I’m interested in how narratives arise from simply taking things out of context and thrusting them together,” Deverney says. “How the collage material relates depends on the associations we make with the content.  They are almost like dreams to me… Vague fogs, with little snippets of information that allude to some sort of dialogue or story.”

Alana

Alana Zimmer

December 9, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Ric Stultz - Space Suit of the Week

Ric Stultz - Space Suit of the Week

Ric Stultz - Space Suit of the Week

This week’s Space Suit of the Weeek comes from Ric Stultz, an illustrator and painter hailing from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Reaching Out to You, The Dream Got Control, and Sleeping with the Fishes (above) are really playful and rather cheeky, a departure from a lot of the work we feature. After taking a stroll through his portfolio, I was chuckling more often than not. His work feels familiar or rather comfortable – like you’re sharing a recurring childhood dream where imagination was the basis of reality.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

December 2, 2011 / By

Space Thing of the Week

Space Thing of the Week

Space Thing of the Week

The earth is a truly spectacular place. Michael König compiled this video from footage taken by Expedition XXVIII & IXX aboard the International Space Station from August to October 2011. The footage is courtesy of NASA Johnson Space Center Image Science & Analysis Laboratory’s Gateway to Astronaut Photography.

König’s compilation includes a number of views of Aurora Borealis & Aurora Australis. One would be quite cosmically fortunate to witness something so spectacular from earth let alone witness it from space- repetitively. Expeditions are long duration missions flown by the Russian Federal Space Agency usually lasting about four months in orbit. These sights, shown above, occur more often than most enough will ever have the opportunity to enjoy (unless you live in the arctic circle).

I tried to calculate how many times one would be able to possibly witness these sights from the International Space Station, but calculus has been long been lost in the dusty archives of my brain. I did however figure that those on board see eighteen sunsets and eighteen sunrises every twenty-four hours. Give or take a couple, an Expedition crew member could witness 2,162 sunsets during a mission. I can’t even begin to fathom what it would feel like to wake up in the morning, look out the window and see the sunset or the green hues of an Aurora Borealis dance across the horizon. Let’s only hope that the crew isn’t jaded by the end of it.

Alana

Originally found via Colossal. Also thanks to the7000club for the tip!

Alana Zimmer

November 18, 2011 / By

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