Space Suit of the Week

Alicia Framis is the Lost Astronaut.

The Lost Astronaut was one of the Performa 09 Biennial performance installations that explored the identity of the astronaut and concept of living on the moon. The activities performed by the lost (female) astronaut were dictated by a slew of other authors and artists–like complete a New York Times Sunday crossword puzzle, ride a subway line from end point to end point, etc. The work explored a domestic side of space exploration or, rather, the lack thereof.

Framis situates the iconic landing on the moon in the metropolitan American dream. The work is subtle, almost transcendental, as she stops to experience the city in a new, leisurely and monumental fashion.

In a city that never sleeps, its easy to feel lost.

Performa 11, New Visual Art Performance Biennial, is currently underway in New York City. It ends November 21st.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

November 11, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

William Immer takes classic portraits persons in social and political power and places them into contemporaneity, making for playful and rich oil paintings. He is associated with Aureus Contemporary and their statement on him explains: “Working with the idea that the history of art is often lost in the broad view of things, Immer started taking a closer look at how people view that history and what exactly they might be looking at. Starting with the language of the observed, he began to take the details into all sorts of visual direction.” Astro-Lady does just that. I honestly don’t know anything about seventeenth century portraiture or the source of inspiration to this piece, but my heart skipped a beat when I first saw it.

This piece reminds me of Kenn Brown and Cris Wren’s Blue Boy Re-Visioned (2004) that Alex wrote about last year. Their Cosmonaut rendition of Gainsbourough’s The Boy Boy (1770) was the cover piece of an anthology of short stories of how the world would be different if various technologies evolved and were successfully applied at an earlier time. Simliarily, Immer’s Astro-Lady could be a fitting cover.

Astro-Lady is shown in the classic astronaut pose in a white EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity, AKA space walk) suit and helmet resting by her forearm. Donned in her Elizabethan collar and bonnet, the colors of Holland are brandished across her arm. I enjoy that she’s wearing an EVA suit whose white color is intended to reflect the sun’s heat so the astronaut doesn’t get too warm. In my opinion, portraiture in the seventeenth century is cold and sterile: Astro-Lady is one intergalactic monarch that I wouldn’t mind paying homage to.

Found via Juxtapoz Magazine

Alana

Alana Zimmer

November 4, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

No Surrender

DAL’s newest work, No Surrender, was made in Paris, France this past September. Unlike many of DAL’s other works, this piece is tucked away in an intimate space, enclosed from passersby. The spaceman in No Surrender is traversing through an urban terrain that is being reclaimed by nature: a space that could be easily overlooked, but not forgotten.

While intimate, No Surrender is rather jarring. The spaceman, in DAL’s signature black and white coils, is devoid of a face. He has no identity as does the flag next to him. Its highly reminiscent of Apollo 11 imagery, where astronaut Buzz Aldrin stands next to the lunar flag–but DAL’s No Surrender wipes away the stars and stripes and leaves his space creature empty and full of possibility.

DAL is a street artist hailing from China. After studying sculpture at the NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts, he started making street art under the alias DAL in 2004.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

October 28, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Space Farm by NASA

Space Farm by NASA

Space Farm by NASA

Space Farm is one of the newest national public outreach projects undertaken by NASA this Autumn. Seven farms across the country are celebrating the history of the national space program by creating a corn maze that commemorates NASA’s achievements and progress in space. The mazes are created by The MAiZE, the largest cornfield maze consulting and design company.

I will admit that I am quite biased as I look forward to Fall all year round and thought that M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs was brilliant, but I personally believe this is one of the most spectacular ways of engaging the public in space exploration. By embracing the popular lure of paranormal crop circle creation, NASA has repainted the phenomenon to educate and inspire. When embracing the folklore of space exploration, its nice to know that we’re not alone out there.

For more information on participating farms, visit Space Farm 7.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

October 14, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Ansuman Biswas and Jem Finer wrapped in technicolor harem pants, bejeweled waistcoats and golden turbans took the mystic flight of the magic carpet in 2001 Zero Genie. Wonder by wonder, they reconstruct the history of human space flight. Their artist statement reads:

…The Zero Genies are just beginners. Poverty stricken, slightly uncoordinated, and yet noble, they are convinced that space travel is not the exclusive pursuit of the rich and rational Western world. They are here to show that a comfortable carpet and well-packed hookah will suffice.

The genies are flying from inside the magic lamp of Cosmonaut’s Training Center in Star City, Russia. More technically, the intervals of periodic weightlessness occur from the elliptical flight path relative to the center of the Earth.

The genies are stark contrast next to cosmonaut flight attendants in their blue jumpsuits. They recreate the narrative of human space flight, remove it from its conceived place in history books of western developed societies. Biswas and Finer are not supernatural creatures only to awaken from the pages of Arabian Nights and return to human form when their seconds weightlessness fleet- they are dreamers and believers who are only bound by the limits of their imagination.

Biswas and Finer are two of many artists that have explored creating art in zero gravity.
For more information as zero gravity art, check out the Zero Gravity Arts Consortium or Arts Catalyst.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

October 7, 2011 / By

Space Suit of the Week

Revered Richard Avedon edited and photographed the April 1965 Harper’s Bazaar. The issue was devoted to youth culture- “Pop, Rock, and the Sexual Revolution”.The cover, which made the American Society of Magazine Editor’s 2005 list of Top 40 Magazine Covers, features Jean Shrimpton in a Day-Glo space helmet. The image has been highly reproduced as an emblem of the sixties when Mod was king and the Space Race dominated popular culture.

The issue was a guidebook to the cultural now. The edition features spacesuit inspired fashions of André Courrèges, the likeness of ‘60s megastars like the Beatles as well as the rising talent of Andy Warhol, Roy Lictenstein, Robert Rauschenberg and others.

I especially enjoy the images of  “the Shrimp”, some shown above. Shrimpton was the It girl of 1960s fashion and became the face of off-beat culture. Avedon couldn’t have picked a better model to be his galaxy girl. At a time when the idea of a female astronaut was unheard of, Shrimpton was the face of youth culture.

The worlds of fashion and space industry in the 1960s collided. Alex previously posted about Nicholas de Monchaux’s bookSpacesuit: Fashioning Apollo which among other things discusses how Playtex, the brassiere manufacturer, secured the contract to make the Apollo Spacesuits.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

September 30, 2011 / By

Vincent Fournier’s Space Project – Space Suit of the Week

Vincent Fournier’s Space Project constructs a new reality in the fantasy of space exploration. Over the past decade and a half, Fournier has captured a wide array of space organizations from around the world:  Gagarine Cosmonaut Training Center (Russia), Mars Desert Research Station (USA), Guyana Space Center (French Guiana) Atacama Desert observatories (Chile), International School of Space (Kazakhstan), Kennedy Space Center (USA) and other facilities.

Through the seamless compilation of photographed space, he has created an identity of the space traveler that is simply human. His artist statement reads, “The project came from the experience that we all have whilst looking at the stars during our childhood, when we suddenly realise the infinity of the universe and that we are but a tiny part of it.”

His spacesuit photograghs are striking as they take on personalities of their own. Sometimes the suits look lost in a foreign land, like the 2008 Mars Society creatures venturing across desolate terrain. Others seem completely domestic, as in the 2007 Star City space suit photographs, where hues of the space suit blend perfectly into the wallpaper as if it is a fixture to hung on the wall like a clock or a collection of well loved trinkets. Even Fournier’s machines look like sleeping giants ready to awaken, beep, gurgle and then turn their gaze to sky.

Alana

Alana Zimmer

September 23, 2011 / By

Space Thing of the Week

Space Thing of the Week

Space Thing of the Week

This past Wednesday NASA unveiled the design of the next generation of heavy launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). It’s design bears an uncanny resemblance to Saturn V, the Apollo launch vehicle that took Buzz, Neil and the rest of the gang to the moon.

The Space Launch System is the first exploration-class vehicle since Saturn V. Incorporating technological advancements from the Space Shuttle and Constellation program, SLS would be the most powerful rocket in history giving NASA the potential to explore deeper into space. The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) that will house the future crew venturing into solar system resembles the Apollo Command/Service Module [CSM]. The beefier Orion will be able to house a larger crew for a more extended period of time.

Space Thing of the Week

The Space Launch System harkens back to the golden age of space exploration- where anything was possible. A time when human exploration beyond the lower earth orbit was a national goal. Space was the place and humans needed to be there. It’ll be exciting to see the development of the Space Launch System in the upcoming years (fingers crossed). With a possible lift capacity of 130 tons or more, SLS is a beast. If developed, who knows how far we can travel.

Alana Zimmer

September 16, 2011 / By

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