Designer Matt Chase Creates Powerful Graphics That Are More Like Pieces of Art

Matt Chase

Last week I had the pleasure of meeting designer/illustrator Matt Chase at a meet-up over beers. Curious to see his work I was excited to see that he does fantastic work around editorial illustration and publication design. His work is highly stylized and full of graphic punch, illustrating strong messages with only the minimal elements necessary. You can see that he’s been influenced by some of the great designers out there but I feel like he brings his own unique touches to his pieces.

If you dig his work you can purchase some of them (like the beautiful piece above for The Great Gatsby) over in his shop. The sprinkle popsicle skateboard deck is calling my name.

Matt Chase

Matt Chase

Matt Chase

Matt Chase

Bobby Solomon

September 29, 2014 / By

Thom Yorke Surprisingly Drops Brand New Album, Available Via BitTorrent and Vinyl

Thom Yorke - Tomorrow's Modern Boxes

Seemingly out of nowhere Thom Yorke dropped a new album titled Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes this morning, to the delight of Radiohead nerds around the world. In typical Thom Yorke fashion he opted to release the album through a rather unconventional source: BitTorrent. For $6 you receive a BitTorrent bundle that contains eight tracks and an extremely odd music video featuring close-ups of Yorke’s face and him jumping around with boxing gloves. You be you Thom. You also have the option of buying the album on vinyl which looks pretty rad, though it’s £30.00 price tag might be a tougher pill to swallow. Still, I’m sure it was pressed in a very small edition so you may want to snag one while you can.

Bobby Solomon

September 26, 2014 / By

Ambio, A Stylishly Designed Lamp Filled With Bioluminescent Bacteria

Ambio, A Modern Lamp Filled With Bioluminescent Bacteria

Fusing nature and technology is an interesting practice. Biomimetics is sure to be a field ripe with potential in the near future though a few intrepid designers are already start to spearhead the way. Teresa van Dongen, an Amsterdam based designer who also studied Biology at the University of Amsterdam, hasn’t gone completely biomimetic but you can see the principles in her Ambio light. The “lamp” is filled with a glowing bacteria that was collected from octopi, which when shaken lights up with a beautiful blue tone.

Ocean waves glowing blue in the dark of night, anyone who has ever experienced this knows how magical it looks. The phenomenon is caused by bioluminescent bacteria in seawater that emit light in response to oxygen and movement. This principle inspired me to combine my passion for design and biology in a bioluminescent light installation.

It’s a pretty great idea that certainly has potential for using nature as a source of light. If someone can figure out how to keep the bacteria alive in the glass tube, or create a synthetic version of the bacteria (whatever that might mean) you could imagine these as potential night lights. The physical design of the lamps are also aesthetically beautiful as well, truly adding to the beauty of the idea.

Ambio, A Modern Lamp Filled With Bioluminescent Bacteria

Bobby Solomon

September 25, 2014 / By

Steven Soderbergh Recontextualizes ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ To Highlight It’s Staging

Steven Soderbergh Recontextualizes 'Raiders of the Lost Ark' To Highlight It's Staging

Steven Soderbergh Recontextualizes 'Raiders of the Lost Ark' To Highlight It's Staging

Only a director like Steven Soderbergh would be intrepid enough to turn Steven Spielberg’s classic Raiders of the Lost Ark black and white and overdub it with Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ soundtrack music, all in the name of learning. In a recent post on his site he uses this version of the film to teach staging of scenes, an art that Spielberg did masterfully.

I value the ability to stage something well because when it’s done well its pleasures are huge, and most people don’t do it well, which indicates it must not be easy to master (it’s frightening how many opportunities there are to do something wrong in a sequence or a group of scenes. Minefields EVERYWHERE. Fincher said it: there’s potentially a hundred different ways to shoot something but at the end of the day there’s really only two, and one of them is wrong).

It’s actually really interesting to watch the film in such a different way: no color, no dialogue, and a very contemporary soundtrack that’s cut to each scene. My only complaint is that there’s no way to like this, thus no way to be able to watch this on the Vimeo channel on my Apple TV. Watching this on my Macbook Pro is definitely not as impactful as the experience on my TV would be.

Bobby Solomon

September 24, 2014 / By

Peter Mendelsund Teaches Book Cover Design on Skillshare

Peter Mendelsund Teaches Book Cover Design on Skillshare

I don’t tend to post about many online classes but this Skillshare class certainly caught my attention. The extremely talented Peter Mendelsund is offering up his knowledge for an upcoming class on book cover design, teaching how to read as a graphic designer, iterate with imagination, and breaking the “rules” to make your message stand out.

Skillshare conducted an interview with Mendelsund on their blog, and I this question and answer in particular stood out to me.

Why is lifelong learning important to you?
PM: Lifelong learning is crucial. I had been one thing for most of my life [ed. note: a musician] and changed very late to a new career. I’m extremely aware of the twists and turns that life can take, and I think the key is really to maintain an open mind over a long period of time. Life is long: be open to the changes that present themselves to you.

You can sign up for the design class by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

September 23, 2014 / By

Ani Kasten’s ‘In The Rough’, Now On View at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

Ani Kasten at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

A couple weeks ago I stopped by the Heath Ceramics in Los Angeles for the opening of In The Rough, a new ceramics show featuring the work of Ani Kasten. Her work is a balance of roughness and delicacy with many of her glazes replicating the textures of nature, like tree bark or dried up river beds. Complimenting this texture though is always this smooth whiteness or a rigid grid of lines that make seems bring an order to the abstract roughness. Kasten says as much about her work:

The shapes and surface treatments take their influence from plants, water, rocks and clay, as well as from architecture, industry and machinery. The forms integrate these sometimes opposite sensibilities into a composed landscape, such as a stand of bamboo-like, truncated cylinders, perforated with small windows to look like corroded skyscrapers, or a simple, pure form such as a smooth sphere, marked on its surface with an off-center, wandering imprint, like bird tracks in the sand. The pieces are often truncated, off-center, weathered and perforated, combining natural movement and an apparent state of organic deterioration that invokes the cycle of life, death, decay.

The show is on display until October 5th and pieces are available on the Heath website.

Ani Kasten at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

Ani Kasten at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

Ani Kasten at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

Ani Kasten at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

Ani Kasten at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

Ani Kasten at Heath Ceramics, Los Angeles

Bobby Solomon

September 23, 2014 / By

‘The Tale of The Princess Kaguya’, Coming To The States October 17th

Though there has been a lot of talk around Studio Ghibli closing or simply taking a break it’s refreshing that they are still releasing their films here in the States. Opening October 17th is The Tale of The Princess Kaguya, which was directed by legendary creator Isao Takahata who co-founded Ghibli with Miyazaki. The story is based on the folktale The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter:

Found inside a shining stalk of bamboo by an old bamboo cutter and his wife, a tiny girl grows rapidly into an exquisite young lady. The mysterious young princess enthralls all who encounter her – but ultimately she must confront her fate, the punishment for her crime.

To me this is visually one of the finest films Ghibli has released since Spirited Away. I like that the film feels like a dream with rough sketched ideas and abstract sumi-e splatters that create the action. It’s a stark contrast to Miyazaki’s take on anime and a welcome addition to the Ghibli roster of films.

The Tale of The Princess Kaguya

The Tale of The Princess Kaguya

The Tale of The Princess Kaguya

Bobby Solomon

September 23, 2014 / By

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