Sponsored – Typography as Language: A New Summer Residency Program at the School of Visual Arts

SVA Typography Classes

Join the School of Visual Arts from June 30-July 24 for a new four-week summer residency, Typography as Language.

Design a typeface and use it in a project of your choosing in any media—on screen or on paper. Each student will have 24-hour access to a workstation in the Typography as Language studio in New York’s Chelsea district and the opportunity to study closely with renowned type designers Tobias Frere-Jones, Jessica Hische, James Montalbano and Daniel Rhatigan plus a stellar roster of guest lecturers. The program is built around interrelated one-week modules, covering technical, theoretical, historical and practical studies. Studio workshops and field trips will complement class projects and allow students to get acquainted with world famous design studios and letterpress facilities. Applications from students and working professionals across all design disciplines are welcome.

For more information and details on how to apply, visit sva.edu/residency/typography.

Bobby Solomon

April 8, 2014 / By

John Maeda Interview on The Great Discontent

John Maeda Interview on The Great Discontent

The Great Discontent interviews designer John Maeda about his path in life, his mentors, taking risks, and lots of great stuff. This point about being a part of a community caught my eye.

Is it important to you to be part of a creative community?
Creative or not, it’s important to be in a diverse community with people who have different backgrounds and skills. I think that’s why New York is such a great place to live. There’s so much diversity. I’d rather be a creature in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef that is teeming with life of all kinds than in someone’s pond with carp.

Couldn’t agree more. Limiting your learning environment to those like you limits the amount of things you can learn overall.

Bobby Solomon

April 8, 2014 / By

Fantastic Illustrations of Places by Nick Bear

Nick Bear

Nick Bear

I’m a huge fan of Sketch Dailies, a Twitter based collection of artists creating work around a theme, and because of it I came across the work of Nick Bear. Nick is a Seattle based illustrator who creates some really hysterical drawings, a lot of which are Pokemon. But I really found that his drawings of buildings and cities were quite beautiful, so I’ve collected a bunch below for you to check out.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 8, 2014 / By

Tobias Frere-Jones Is Back With A New Blog

New York Typography - Tobias Frere-Jones

After the much publicized break-up of Hoefler and Frere-Jones, one of the finest typography duos of recent history, Tobias Frere-Jones is back at it with a brand new blog. His first post blog post is titled My Kind of Neighborhood where he shows the impressive type scene thriving in New York… between the years of 1828 and 1909.

I re-read Maurice Annenberg’s “Type Foundries of America and their Catalogs”, tracked down business directories of the period, and spent too much time in Google Earth. But I was able to plot out the locations for every foundry that had been active in New York between 1828 (the earliest records I could find with addresses) to 1909 (see below). All of the buildings have been demolished, and in some cases the entire street has since been erased. But a startling picture still emerged: New York once had a neighborhood for typography.

New York Typography - Tobias Frere-Jones

Bobby Solomon

April 8, 2014 / By

Spotify’s Design Update Looks Tall, Dark, And Handsome

Spotify Design Update

When it comes to streaming music I’m a devout Rdio user, specifically because of it’s clean, organized design. But now the originator of streaming music Spotify has released a fresh new design that almost feels like the dark, swarthy twin of Rdio.

The UI has been significantly cleaned up and simplified, though in my opinion it feels like it’s taken a lot of cues from Rdio, although still awkwardly it looks like a mash-up of iTunes and an old Windows application. Still, it’s too early to be hyper-critical of the effort. Clearly the design team there has been empowered to start making changes to the UI, and hopefully we’ll be seeing incremental changes rolling out from here.

Bobby Solomon

April 7, 2014 / By

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