Stationery Compositions by Present and Correct

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Stationery Compositions is blog full of carefully curated and composed (duh) photographs of stationery (double duh). It continues Present And Correct’s aesthetics with it’s muted pallet and minimal use of industrial patterns to display their products but rather than coming off as a P&C promo it’s a more crafted affair. Neal has put them together in way that takes each item out of it’s context and abstracts it, creating these photo-flattened collages of utilitarian design.

My favourite is definitely the top image, the colours are particularly well chosen. Even though it’s early days you can view the rest of the project here as Neal hopes to update it daily.

You can also hark back to my interview with Neal here!

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Michael Arnold

April 9, 2014 / By

Interview with an Editor: Serena Guen of SUITCASE Magazine

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I’ve always thought that with the decreasing readership of print it wasn’t that it needed to keep up with the times but rather retarget itself. It seemed to me that print could be kept alive not by dumbing down but by smartening up and aiming itself at a new audience. You only need to take a look at some of the most recent additions to the magazine world to see I might not be far off. Editors and Designers are putting far more emphasis on creating something that will be read rather than skimmed. Filling a niche for a quality travel magazine aimed at women is SUITCASE, run by 23 year old Editor-in-Chief Serena Guen. With its feet in culture and fashion, SUITCASE has received much accolade and without sounding superfluous looks on track to perhaps become the feminine Monocle.

I spoke to the adventurous and ambitious Serena on the origins of SUITCASE and her outlook on learning and work.

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Michael Arnold

February 6, 2014 / By

Interview with an Illustrator: Dan Woodger

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Since graduating three years ago Dan Woodger’s oblong-eyed creations have graced the pages of numerous editorials, like ESPN and The New York Times, and have been part of campaigns for GiffGaff, The Webby Awards, and Oreos. It’s easy to see why. His highly stylized, comic book figures have an all-age appeal to them that’s eager to be snapped by companies large and small to give them the charming and cheeky edge they need.

What I love about his work is the Where’s Wally-esque packed-in nature of his pieces where every element is an illustration in itself. Minimalism isn’t in his repertoire. I spoke to Dan about his work and the role education played in his comeuppance (there’s a theme here!) as well as future projects and how he almost became a golfing instructor, to give you young’uns an insight into the mind of an illustrator.

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Michael Arnold

January 7, 2014 / By

Interview with a Business: Neal Whittington of Present & Correct

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In these times of recession and High-Street closures now more than ever stores need to up their game and provide something focused. Combining a digital presence with a physical one is a tricky job but one store that is rolling in the successes of it is Present & Correct – the independent stationary and supply store. Since it’s conception in 2008 it’s been a home of carefully curated global goods all with that certain classic vibe to them without the now tacky ‘vintage’ tag plastered all over it.

I spoke to the founder, Neal Whittington, about how he started Present & Correct, how he keeps it running and his background before hand.

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Michael Arnold

December 18, 2013 / By

Interview with an Agency: Jennifer and Mario of Hugo & Marie

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Creative agency and artist managers Hugo & Marie is run by Jennifer Marie Gonzalez, who works as the representative and producer, along with her husband and partner Mario Hugo Gonzalez, who works as the agency’s Creative Director. Together they have carved out a sector of the design world, focusing on their carefully curated list of illustrators and designers. Together hey’ve worked with clients like Nowness, Stella McCartney, and Dolce & Gabbana to Microsoft, Wired Magazine and Converse.

Their dedication to the whole product has seen them work, direct, and collaborate on some incredible projects. At times they come across more as fine artists than commercial designers, which they say is an important part of their practice as well as for creatives as a whole. It’s through this process that they have become more than just a creative agency, they’ve situated themselves almost as a brand taking great care of every aspect – so much so that I think it’s fair to say companies seek them out for that “Hugo & Marie look.”

I spoke to them Jennifer and Mario to get an insight into the work they both do and how Hugo & Marie came to be.

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Michael Arnold

December 4, 2013 / By

Interview with an Illustrator: Scott Campbell

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Illustrator, Artist and doodler Scott Campbell has just released the follow up to the successful Great Showdowns book – The Return. It builds upon it’s prequel and again is filled with classic defining Pop Culture moments. It takes on the same competitiveness as a Where’s Wally (or Waldo for you guys across the sea) book where you’re instantly trying to guess the scene as quickly as possible. With no verbal clues you’d have to be a real film buff to get them all correct but even if you don’t the book reads like a more playful version of a coffee table book.

I spoke to Scott recently on the origins of this series and his background in design below.

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Michael Arnold

November 26, 2013 / By

Making Your Bones – Thoughts on breaking into the Creative Industry

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The creative industry is a tough business to get into, no matter what sector you look at, you need to stand out. Those interested are increasingly looking to their degrees to propel them forward – but is it as effective anymore or even necessary altogether? I come from a degree-less background and although I am far from accomplished, here are my thoughts on the subject.

The final years of my school education were a frenzied time for a lot of people; between applying for Universities (or colleges, for you guys across the ocean), studying for exams and deciding on what you were going to do with your life it became quite stressful. It quickly became apparent to me that a lot people were treating the decision to go to University as just the next logical step rather than considering whether they really needed to or wanted to. My reasons for eschewing my place were not fully formed at the time but looking back it was because I just felt it wasn’t right for me – how could anyone teach me how to be creative? The idea seemed counterintuitive.

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Michael Arnold

October 23, 2013 / By

Interview with an Independent Publisher: Cathy Olmedillas of Anorak Magazine

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The term Independent Publisher is barely vast enough to cover the amount of work and different thinking caps you need to put on to be one. In the day of the ‘Print is dead’ generation publishers are increasingly taking more and more control of their end product ensuring that it’s not just a magazine you’re picking up but rather an experience and escape from the real world – not to mention the digital world. No other publication embodies this more than the perfectly put together children’s magazine Anorak.

Since it’s inaugural issue in 2006 it has been able to capture the hearts of children before they are consumed by technology and set free the square eyes of adults after they’ve lost their sense of childish abandon. It’s a magazine that’s had incredible success and after 29 issues (and not to mention numerous other projects) it’s still going strong. I spoke to Founder and Editor Cathy Olmedillas about her start with Anorak Magazine ahead of the release of their BIG BOOK OF ANORAK, an annual 224 page compendium of stories, activities and educational pieces that ran in the early (and now sold out) editions of Anorak.

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Michael Arnold

September 25, 2013 / By

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