Scott Albrecht Reflects on Time, Perception and Interconnectivity Through A New Body of Work

Scotty Albrecht

We’re big fans of the Brooklyn-based artist Scott Albrecht so we were very excited to discover that he has been busy recently working on a brand new body of work. Incorporating woodwork, hand-drawn type and and geometric collage, Scott has continued to produce interesting and engaging art which always feels fresh and unique.

Scotty Albrecht

Scotty Albrecht

This latest series was made for an upcoming solo exhibition that will open in Philadelphia’s Art in the Age this Friday (October 3rd). Titled The Distance Between Two Points, the show explores themes of time, perception and inter-connectivity. Scott says that his goal was to create work with layers of meaning. His approach was holistic, with each piece functioning individually yet collectively they convey a larger message.

Scotty Albrecht

Scotty Albrecht

I love Scott’s approach to the way he uses different mediums. He’s never afraid to try new things yet this never detracts from his distinctive style. I particularly like his latest series called Situations (some images featured above). Here he paints mostly in black and white (with small accents of teal and coral appearing in other images) and a motif of an eye runs through the entire set of images. This symbolizes observation and personal experience. I love the graphic sensibility of this work and together they form a wonderfully striking series.

Scotty Albrecht

The Distance Between Two Points opens at Philadelphia’s Art in the Age on October 3rd and runs until the 31st.

Philip Kennedy

September 30, 2014 / By

A (Farm) House in the Hamptons

Barn House by D’apostrophe Design

Barn House by D’apostrophe Design

Located in the quite hamlet of Remsenburg near New York’s Westhampton, Barn House is a beautiful home renovated from a faux barn that was originally built in the 1980s. Today it stands as the weekend home of Le Pain Quotidien CEO Vincent Herbert and his family.

Barn House by D’apostrophe Design

Designed by Herbert’s close friend – the interior architect Francis D’Haene of D’Apostrophe Design – the project seems to have been a real passion project for the client and designer, with D’Haene mixing old and new to excellent effect.

Barn House by D’apostrophe Design

I love the rustic charm on the outside of the home. D’Haene seems to have really wanted to maintain this and even added wood salvaged from a 200-year-old Canadian barn to add to the personality of the outside. Inside is a different story all-together. Almost nothing from the original interior was. Low-ceilings and dated surfaces were quickly scrapped and replaced with an interior which pares everything back to the bare essentials. It makes for a great interior and I would certainly love to spend a couple of long-weekends in this wonderfully minimalist retreat.

Barn House by D’apostrophe Design

Philip Kennedy

September 25, 2014 / By

Ethan Cook is a Painter Without Paint

Ethan Cook

Brooklyn based artist Ethan Cook is a painter that doesn’t paint… or at least, he doesn’t paint in any traditional way. Instead, his work is deeply concerned in exploring the elemental aspects of painting. At the heart of what he does lies a desire to investigate and deconstruct the physical elements that make up paintings themselves.

Ethan Cook

Cook is an artist who is interested in materials. His visual outcomes are derived from the materials he uses and for Cook, that means that painting is as much about canvas as it is about paint. It is through this belief that he produces his own material; creating his own canvas through a rather labor-intensive process with a loom.

In the work shown here we can see examples of the artist mixing canvas with canvas. It emphasizes the fundamental elements of the art and also brings a beautiful mix of textures and tones.

Ethan Cook

While his work may be constructed through a rigid set of rules and restrictions, there’s also a beautiful understated minimalism in his compositions that can’t be ignored. While his work may explore rather interesting questions about the very nature of the image the formal qualities of his work are just as engaging. I love the confidence and the restraint in this work.

Ethan Cook

See more from Cook here.

Philip Kennedy

September 23, 2014 / By

Arist Toshitaka Aoyagi’s Explores Color Bleeds With Beautiful Results

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Toshitaka Aoyagi is an artist from Tokyo, Japan. Recently he has been experimenting with color; creating an elegantly simply series called – wait for it – ‘Color’.

Specifically the work is an exploration into color bleeding, with the artist creating a number of pale white shelves that include a tiny hint of a fluorescent color. The end result is a beautifully minimal exploration into the power of color. I love it.

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

More projects from Toshitaka Aoyagi can be viewed on Behance.

Philip Kennedy

September 22, 2014 / By

Fou de Feu Celebrate Rhythm and Balance With This New Tableware Range

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

Fou de Feu is a ceramic studio by Belgian designer Veerle Van Overloop. Her latest collection is called Rhythm and it’s clear to see why. Simple stripped-down ceramics is the order of the day as she mixes white porcelain with other materials such as wood, leather and marble. In doing this she has created an inspiring tableware range where the simplicity of her work and her combination of materials come together to form an effortlessly beautiful collection.

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

“Different sizes of plates, cups & spoons, tablemats and cutting boards give every table its own rhythm” says van Overloop. If she’s right, then her newest collection will no doubt offer everyone the opportunity to build their own harmonic arrangements at the dining-room table.

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

Found via the excellent This is Paper. You can see more from Fou de Feu here.

Philip Kennedy

September 18, 2014 / By

You’ve Never Seen a Clock Quite Like ‘A Million Times Project’ by Humans since 1982

A million Times Project, 2013

Per Emanuelsson and Bastian Bischoff founded their studio in 2009/2010 while they were both taking a Masters course at Gothenburg’s School of Design and Crafts. Realizing that they were both born in 1982, they chose Humans since 1982 as their name, then they found a studio to work from in Stockholm and they’ve been making work together ever since.

Perhaps their most exciting project to-date has been the ‘A Million Times Project’. Started last year, this project presents time in a way I’m sure you’ve never seen before. Graphically conceptual, their design combines engineering and mechanics to create an incredible kinetic installation that takes the arms of a traditional analogue clock and turns them into something new and exciting. Check out the video below to see what I mean.

Using 288 analogue clocks, the original work uses an iPad to create a series of wonderful visual patterns; playfully turning a collection of minimalist analogue clockfaces into a fully-functioning digital clock. Now a series, the duo have worked on a number of variations, with each piece being unique. They describe these creations as “objects unleashed from a solely pragmatic existence”. And in doing this I feel that they have discovered some wonderfully figurative qualities within their design without detracting from the clocks original function. It’s a pretty commendable achievement… and also it clearly looks amazing!

A million Times Project, 2013

A million Times Project, 2013

A million Times Project, 2013

See more projects from Humans since 1982 on their website.

Philip Kennedy

September 17, 2014 / By

Check Out Nicholas Hanna’s Incredible Bubble Devices

Nicholas Hanna

Artist Nicholas Hanna seems to have a real curiosity for life. He holds a Master of Architecture degree from Yale and an MFA in Media Arts from UCLA. A native of Canada, his work investigates the sensation of wonder and the essential relationship between humans and technology.

Nicholas Hanna

I love his Bubble Devices. These mechanical installations are almost as wide as a room and they create giant bubbles. They’re the sort of things that need to be seen to be believed so fortunately Hanna has shared some videos online:

Driven by a computer, Hanna’s automatic bubble wand is a fantastic construction and the lighting in the video really captures the beauty of these incredibly large bubbles.

You can see more projects from Nicholas Hanna on his website.

Philip Kennedy

September 16, 2014 / By

Watch An Entire Year of the Sky in Less Than Five Minutes

A History of the Sky

One of my favorite films this year has been Boyhood. Shot over a period of 12 years, it tells the story of Mason as his life unfolds during a period between the ages of 6 and 18. Before seeing the film I imagined that it must be a wonderful spectacle; that there must be something incredible about watching a person literally come-of-age on screen. In actuality, there is no real spectacle to Boyhood. If anything, that’s the real strength of the film. Real life is made up of small fleeting moments, and Boyhood captures these in a beautifully uncinematic way. In doing so, it captures something even greater than spectacle and in its subtly it reveals something more profound.

All of this is little more than preamble to introduce Ken Murphy’s “A History of the Sky”. This project is similar to Boyhood in that its premise seems suitably epic yet its lasting impression feels more poetic than astounding. A time-lapse film shot over the period of one year, Murphy reduces the ever changing skies of San Francisco into a mere 5 minute film.

“A History of the Sky enables the viewer to appreciate the rhythms of weather, the lengthening and shortening of days, and other atmospheric events on an immediate aesthetic level: the clouds, fog, wind, and rain form a rich visual texture, and sunrises and sunsets cascade across the screen.” says the self-described programmer, artist, and tinkerer. I think it’s wonderful!

Philip Kennedy

September 15, 2014 / By

Google+