Designer Stephen Kelleher Meditates on Self-Realization and Self-Preservation

Mind Yourself by Stephen Kelleher

Stephen Kelleher is an Irish-born designer based in Brooklyn. For more than ten years he’s been honing his craft; building a portfolio that is packed full of exciting projects and great ideas. Chiefly working in illustration and motion, he has collaborated with clients such as Coca-Cola, Cartoon Network, Google and The New York Times. For me, he demonstrates a real gift for simplicity and I love his approach to both color and shape.

Mind Yourself by Stephen Kelleher

Recently he worked on a wonderful self-directed project called ‘Mind Yourself’. Made from wood and painted with acrylics, the series consists of three separate pieces. Stephen describes them as “meditations on self-realization and self-preservation”; each one acting as a reminder to take a moment to remember to take care of yourself. The work demonstrates a wonderful talent for simplicity and I love to see a designer step away from their computer and actually make something with their hands. The results are terrific.

Mind Yourself by Stephen Kelleher

More work from Stephen Kelleher can be viewed on his website.

Philip Kennedy

July 25, 2014 / By

Beauty and Destruction in Heather Rasmussen’s ‘Untitled (after the fire)’

Untitled (after the fire) by Heather Rasmussen

I find the image above to be hugely arresting. Taken from a series by photographer Heather Rasmussen called Untitled (after the fire), the image depicts what remains of a doorway after a house fire. As a viewer, I feel somewhat removed from the incident; initially simply drawn to the formal qualities of the work, and yet I’m also struck by the destruction it depicts and haunted by the reflective quality that shines through it.

Untitled (after the fire) by Heather Rasmussen

For Rasmussen the photographs obviously take on a much deeper meaning. She says that the fire caused her to take a look at her life and her possessions. For her, the fire was a moment to step back and decide what was important in her life and to also re-evaluate what comfort and home meant to her. “Through photographing the damaged areas” she says, “I have allowed myself to see what was there before the flames”.

Untitled (after the fire) by Heather Rasmussen

Untitled (after the fire) by Heather Rasmussen

It’s quite a touching and reflective series and I feel it should act as a prompt for others to take a little moment to appreciate the things that they do have in life and to appreciate what home and comfort means to them.

More images from this series and other works can be viewed on Rasmussen’s website.

Philip Kennedy

July 23, 2014 / By

Artist Kyung-Woo Han Creates Rorschach Tests from Plastic Bags

Plastic Rorschach by Han Kyung Woo

Take a look at the image above and what do you see? A bat? A monster? A shopping bag? … Something else? Created by Korean artist Kyung-Woo Han, the artwork is a Rorschach test and like any Rorschach its meaning is open to interpretation.

Han is a graduate of both the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. There’s a playfulness to his work that really appeals to me and he often incorporates optical illusions within his multidisciplinary practice. For Han, the aim is always to create both a sense of wonder and bewilderment for his viewer.

Plastic Rorschach by Han Kyung Woo

The simplicity of this work is what I find most appealing. Boldly graphic, the images play with perception; forcing the viewer to question even further what they see in each picture. If you ask me, this series feels like René Magritte’s The Treachery of Images for a generation raised by consumerism. I love it!

Plastic Rorschach by Han Kyung Woo

See more optical work from Han on his website.

Philip Kennedy

July 21, 2014 / By

Sari Cohen Invites You to View Her Machine Dreams

Sari Cohen - La Culture

Over the week I discovered the work of Sari Cohen; an illustrator and print-maker from Tel Aviv. I love the colors in her work and I really like the shapes and forms that she uses. The work here was created for an exhibition called La Culture which ran in Tel Aviv at the end of May.

Sari Cohen - La Culture

The exhibition was part of a whole festival of illustration which took place in the city for ten days. It was Israel’s first ever Illustration Week and it sounded like they hosted a great series of events. I’ve never heard of a city putting on an illustration week before, and this one in Tel Aviv seems to have really done it well; putting together work from some of the country’s top illustrators as well as hosting dozens of exhibitions, workshops and opportunities for local illustrators and the general public to meet up.

Sari Cohen - La Culture

Sari’s illustration was selected as one of the images to promote the week and I think it’s a wonderful image to pick. Called Machine Dreams, the image is a fantastic piece of work celebrating imagination with surrealism and beautiful dream-like moments. Prints are currently available to purchase here, or perhaps even better is the possibility to buy the image on a dream journal which comes with a rather nifty LED pen hidden inside.

More illustrations from Sari can be viewed on her website.

Philip Kennedy

July 16, 2014 / By

Beautiful Minimalist Quilts by Lindsay Stead

Lindsay Stead - Quilts

Quiltmaker Linday Stead creates some pretty wonderful work. Her quilts are rooted in tradition yet they have a really modern sensibility. Based in Toronto, her designs combine color and pattern to excellent affect, creating work that would look just as good hanging on a wall as it would draped on a bed.

Lindsay Stead - Quilts

All made by hand, each quilt is a one-of-a-kind. According to Lindsay it takes between 30 and 80 hours to complete each one, and the results are fantastic. Personally I love the restraint in her designs; her asymmetrical patterns have a bold graphic sensibility and her fondness for minimalism and modernism really shines through.

Lindsay Stead - Quilts

To see Lindsay at work and to learn a little more about her process and inspiration you can check out this short video created by House&Home:

More work from Lindsay can be viewed on her website.

Philip Kennedy

July 14, 2014 / By

Christoph Niemann Gets Tangled Up in the Brooklyn Bridge and Eiffel Tower

Christoph Niemann - Brooklyn Bridge - Yellow and Grey

I’m a big fan of Christoph Niemann. His Abstract Sunday blog on The New York Times is always a great read and his Petting Zoo app might just be one of the most entertaining apps around. I was checking out his site the other day when I discovered these excellent prints of the Brooklyn Bridge and Eiffel Tower.

Christoph Niemann - Brooklyn Bridge - Yellow and Grey

Like all of Christoph’s work, these illustrations are so effortlessly simple and so perfectly made. The idea is so much fun and the execution just nails it! Produced as a 3 color sikscreen, both images are available to buy through his website. The Brooklyn Bridge image comes in three different colors (though yellow is already sold). I’d love to see this continue as a series; who knows what other monuments could get woven together?

Christoph Niemann - Brooklyn Bridge - Yellow and Grey

You can see more work from Christoph Niemann on his website. The scope and range of his work is fantastic so please do make the effort to check it out!

Philip Kennedy

July 11, 2014 / By

Daniel Heidkamp’s Beautiful, Peaceful Paintings of Central Park

Daniel Heidkamp

Artist Daniel Heidkamp currently has a new solo show on at White Columns in New York and I just love the colors in his work. A native of New York, Heidkamp’s exhibition consists of recent oil paintings that depict the city’s Metropolitan Museum of Art as seen from the grounds of Central Park. Bursting with brightly colored foliage and trees, Heidkamp’s work really captures the beauty of the area.

Daniel Heidkamp

The majority of the work was painted on location and Heidkamp’s work gets the energy of these scenes just right. “When painting en plein air I feel the atmosphere on my skin” Heidkamp says, “[...] there is an adrenaline feeling that happens while working ‘live’ and that energy can translate directly into the painting”.

Daniel Heidkamp

While many of his contemporaries may explore far-less traditional methods of art-making, I feel there’s something special in Heidkamp’s interrogation and exploration of representational painting. Following in the footprints of people like Hopper, Hockney, and Doig; Heidkamp’s focus on ordinary and everyday scenes is as engaging as it is compelling.

Daniel Heidkamp

His exhibition in New York’s White Columns show runs until July 25th. More work and further exhibition dates can be viewed on his website.

Philip Kennedy

July 10, 2014 / By

David Hedberg’s TV Works Only When You Smile

Smile TV by David Hedberg

It’s Art School degree show season and so I’m making the most of it by visiting as many shows as I can muster. The other week I hit up London’s prestigious Royal College of Art to take a look at what their students have been up to and I was really impressed by the talent on display. My personal favorite was the work of David Herdberg; a graduate of the college’s Information Experience Design course.

Smile TV by David Hedberg

For his major project David designed a TV which, on first impressions, looked fairly innocuous. Sure, the reception was poor but the wooden legs looked nice and they worked well with the white plastic casing. It wasn’t until I sat down in front of the set that I noticed a small label which read “SMILE TO WATCH”. Being the typically obedient gallery-goer that I am I kindly followed these instructions and forced the muscles of my face to form the requested smile. Suddenly the signal quickly shot into clarity. My face – still proudly wearing its solicited expression – was repaid with a montage of surreal clips played out on the screen. As I continued to watch my face began to relax back to its typical scowl and as my faux-cheery demeanor faded, so too did the television’s reception.

For David, the work examines how our society has the ability to access endless amounts of content. He notes that in the past a TV’s reception relied on an antenna to work; this TV plays with that idea, creating a set which must rely on the receptive nature of the viewer to function. “By expressing that we like something, we have very much become antennas ourselves – transmitting the content on to somebody else” he says. By combining a set from the last-decade with modern facial recognition technology (i.e. magic), the piece asks us to re-consider how we engage with content and how we access it. It’s a fantastic idea and David’s execution is simply top-notch!

You can see more from David Hedberg on his website.

Philip Kennedy

July 9, 2014 / By

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