Daniel Temkin’s Creates Fantastic Art Through Digital Accidents

Glitchometry Stripes by Daniel Temkin

Glitchometry Stripes is an ongoing body of work from the American artist Daniel Temkin. Started in 2013, the series takes raw digital information and transforms it into beautiful op-art that could rival the likes of Bridget Riley or Victor Vasarely.

Glitchometry Stripes by Daniel Temkin

The process of creating these images involves Temkin taking a series of vertical black and white lines and then importing them into an audio editor. By adding a few simple sound effects to different color channels he finds beautiful results. According to Temkin the image manipulator has a sense of what each effect does, but no precise control over the result. He describes this as “wrestling with the computer”.

Glitchometry Stripes by Daniel Temkin

Glitchometry Stripes by Daniel Temkin

Glitchometry Stripes by Daniel Temkin

I love the colors and shapes within this work. New images from the series frequently get posts to Tumblr. You can check them out here.

Glitchometry Stripes by Daniel Temkin

More exciting projects can be seen on Daniel Temkin’s website.

Philip Kennedy

August 15, 2014 / By

‘Rituals’ – A New Series of Ceramic Alpacas by Monica Ramos

Ritauls by Monica Ramos

Ceramic alpacas! What’s not to love about a ceramic alpaca. Firstly, it’s an alpaca. Secondly, it’s made from ceramics. Thirdly, it looks terrific. And fourthly it works as a plant holder! Not to sound like a broken record, but what’s not to love!

Ritauls by Monica Ramos

These fantastic designs are the work of Monica Ramos (an illustrator who we featured on the site a couple of months ago). Created under the name Rituals, Monica sees this work as simply an extension of her image-making. These objects are tangible, functional and just as full of personalty as her other work. I love them.

Ritauls by Monica Ramos

Ritauls by Monica Ramos

Unfortunately this edition sold out almost immediately, but you can still keep abreast of further work by visiting the Rituals shop.

Philip Kennedy

August 14, 2014 / By

Photographer Emma Hartvig Captures the Coolness of Summer

Emma Hartvig

Emma Hartvig

Emma Hartvig is a photographer originally from Sweden who currently lives and works in London. A recent graduate of the London College of Communication, she’s already managed to exhibit work in New York, Amsterdam, Sweden and London.

Emma Hartvig

Inspired by a love of cinema, she enjoys the boundaries that the medium of photography provides: “I’m very struck by the still image” she says, “I’m interested in the limitations of a photograph in terms of its narrative capacity to have an image that’s frozen in time”.

Emma Hartvig

The photographs here demonstrate this wonderful approach she takes. You can almost feel these images playing out in slow motion yet instead they are frozen in time. For Hartvig, these are isolated moments with no past and no future. Her work plays to the medium’s narrative strengths, allowing the images to hang in their beautiful frozen moments. I love them!

Emma Hartvig

You can check out more work from Emma Hartvig on her website.

Philip Kennedy

August 13, 2014 / By

Artists Explore the Theme of Silence for Nobrow

Kali Ciessmier for Nobrow 9

“What does silence look like? How is it expressed? Can it be visual?” These are the questions Nobrow posed to over 40 international artists and illustrators for the ninth edition of their magazine. It’s a fascinating theme and one which has produced a wide-range of outcomes. Amongst its 128 pages you’ll find scenes of contentment, intimacy and the surreal as well as stories of the mundane, the morose and the amorous.

Owen Davey for Nobrow 9

As with previous editions, this version offers artists a limited 4 way color palette to bring their imagination to the page, and this restriction brings a wonderful unity to the magazine. The pink, orange and blue tones are a beautiful combination and it’s a joy to see how each artist plays with this restraint through their work.

Merijn Hos for Nobrow 9

One of the nicest things about Nobrow’s magazine is that it works as two magazines. On one side it contains large illustration work (as shown in the post), while the reverse is filled with stories by comic artists and visual storytellers.

Jun Cen for Noborw 9

If you’re in any way interested in contemporary illustration I can’t recommend this publication enough! With over 40 artists involved, it’s hard to imagine a more comprehensive magazine. For those interested in the work featured here, it includes (from the top) images by Kali Ciesemier, Owen Davey, Merijn Hos, Jun Cen and Ella Bailey.

Ella Bailey for Nobrow 9

Nobrow 9 is currently available to purchase from the Nobrow website.

Philip Kennedy

August 7, 2014 / By

‘Cobrina’ – Elegant Furniture from Japanese Studio Torafu Architects

Cobrina by Torafu Architects

Formed in 2004, Torafu Architects are a Japanese studio founded by Koichi Suzuno and Shinya Kamuro. The duos work is fantastic, covering a broad and diverse range that includes everything from product design and architecture; to interiors, installations and film making. Recently they collaborated with the well-established Japanese furniture manufacturer Hida Sangyo to produce a furniture collection called Cobrina.

Cobrina by Torafu Architects

Cobrina by Torafu Architects

The name Cobrina comes from the Japanese expression “koburi-na”, which is used to describe things that are small or undersized. It’s a fitting name for a collection that is designed to be small and lightweight. For the duo, it was important that the furniture could easily be moved around – perfect for those who have compact living areas!

Cobrina by Torafu Architects

Consisting of nine pieces, the furniture is made in beautiful oak and each piece is characterized by its playful rounded shapes on both its surfaces and its legs.

Cobrina by Torafu Architects

I love the simplicity and the elegance of this furniture. The hat-stand that includes a small bowl for keys and wallet is a wonderful touch and the bright blue of the chairs adds a lot of great color to a perfectly restrained collection. More images from Torafu Architects can be seen on their website.

Philip Kennedy

August 5, 2014 / By

Hans-Christian Schink Finds the Beauty of Minimalism in the Mundane

Seehausen from Hans-Christian Schink's Walls

Since the early 90’s the German photographer Hans-Christian Schink has been bringing his unique perspective to the world. Represented internationally by many museums and galleries, his photographs often cover a broad range of subjects but a fascination with landscape always seems to be at the heart of his work.

Frankenheim from Hans-Christian Schink's Walls

Gunthersdorf from Hans-Christian Schink's Walls

Between 1995 and 2003 he produced a body of work called Walls. Easily his most abstract series to date, the work highlights Schink’s direct, near confrontational, manner of photography. Shot with a large format camera, the series consists of 11 images, each one demonstrating the photographers strict approach to his subject matter.

Halle Queis from Hans-Christian Schink's Walls

The photographs examine the architecture of commercial buildings. Each image resembles a large color field paintings, with Schink paring down his subject matter to a point of graphic abstraction. Only the smallest hint of subject matter can be detected from the tiny traces of pathways and skylines that Schink choose to include at the edges of his work.

Sanitz from Hans-Christian Schink's Walls

Personally I love the restraint in this series. There’s a striking directness about each image and the colors of these buildings are just wonderful. You can see the complete series on Schink’s website and make sure to also check out more of his work while you’re there.

Philip Kennedy

August 4, 2014 / By

These Beautifully Minimalist Holiday Cottages Look Like The Perfect Getaway

Hofgut by Format Elf Architekten © Lothar Reichel

Deep in Germany’s Bavarian countryside you’ll find these beautifully simple holiday cottages designed by studio Format Elf Architekten. The three buildings were commissioned by Hofgut; a hotel that already offers 7 cabins, a spa and a restaurant. Designed for guests who are looking to stay for a longer period of time, they look like the perfect place to relax, recuperate and enjoy the beautiful surroundings.

Hofgut by Format Elf Architekten © Lothar Reichel

Hofgut by Format Elf Architekten © Lothar Reichel

Photographed here by Lothar Reichel, you can see just how beautiful these buildings are. They were designed to resemble the agricultural buildings of the region, yet in their black-stained timber cladding and their simple form I think they have a real sense of elegance about them.

Hofgut by Format Elf Architekten © Lothar Reichel

Despite their initial similarities there are subtle differences between all three cottages. For example, one is located in a small clearing in the woods and its interior has been enhanced with darker elements to echo its more intimate location. Another can be found beside sloping fields and the architects have decided to use a lighter palette for this cottage. The third can found at the edge of a pond, and this one features the lightest finish. All three offer a large floor space, a kitchen area and a mezzanine.

Hofgut by Format Elf Architekten © Lothar Reichel

They’re a beautiful collection of buildings and I can imagine that they offer a wonderful spot for those looking to getaway from the demands of a busy lifestyle. More work from Format Elf Architekten can be seen on their website.

Philip Kennedy

July 31, 2014 / By

Rocks Burst With Colour in this Beautiful Photographic Series by Inka and Niclas

The Belt of Venus and the Shadow of the Earth by Inka and Niclas

Inka Lindergård and Niclas Holmström are two Swedish-based artists who collaborate together to create some truly striking images. Based in Stockholm, they frequently travel in search of the perfect landscape for their work.

At the core of what they do is an interest in the power of nature and landscape. They are particularly drawn to our perception of these things. Why is it that we like a sunset over an ocean; why are we filled with awe when we see a mountain range?

The Belt of Venus and the Shadow of the Earth by Inka and Niclas

Often verging on the supernatural, their work plays with the components of nature that inspire awe. Take for example this series entitled The Belt of Venus and the Shadow. Here the duo extract the lush colors of a sunset and transfer them to the rocks of the shoreline. By doing so the natural becomes the unnatural and the tangible suddenly becomes metaphysical.

The Belt of Venus and the Shadow of the Earth by Inka and Niclas

It’s a beautiful series and I think the simplicity of their idea is very effective. The Belt of Venus and the Shadow is only one of a number of projects that explore similar territory. You can see more work from Inka and Niclas on their website.

The Belt of Venus and the Shadow of the Earth by Inka and Niclas

Philip Kennedy

July 29, 2014 / By

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