Ethan Cook is a Painter Without Paint

Ethan Cook

Brooklyn based artist Ethan Cook is a painter that doesn’t paint… or at least, he doesn’t paint in any traditional way. Instead, his work is deeply concerned in exploring the elemental aspects of painting. At the heart of what he does lies a desire to investigate and deconstruct the physical elements that make up paintings themselves.

Ethan Cook

Cook is an artist who is interested in materials. His visual outcomes are derived from the materials he uses and for Cook, that means that painting is as much about canvas as it is about paint. It is through this belief that he produces his own material; creating his own canvas through a rather labor-intensive process with a loom.

In the work shown here we can see examples of the artist mixing canvas with canvas. It emphasizes the fundamental elements of the art and also brings a beautiful mix of textures and tones.

Ethan Cook

While his work may be constructed through a rigid set of rules and restrictions, there’s also a beautiful understated minimalism in his compositions that can’t be ignored. While his work may explore rather interesting questions about the very nature of the image the formal qualities of his work are just as engaging. I love the confidence and the restraint in this work.

Ethan Cook

See more from Cook here.

Philip Kennedy

September 23, 2014 / By

Arist Toshitaka Aoyagi’s Explores Color Bleeds With Beautiful Results

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Toshitaka Aoyagi is an artist from Tokyo, Japan. Recently he has been experimenting with color; creating an elegantly simply series called – wait for it – ‘Color’.

Specifically the work is an exploration into color bleeding, with the artist creating a number of pale white shelves that include a tiny hint of a fluorescent color. The end result is a beautifully minimal exploration into the power of color. I love it.

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

Colors by Toshitaka Aoyagi

More projects from Toshitaka Aoyagi can be viewed on Behance.

Philip Kennedy

September 22, 2014 / By

Fou de Feu Celebrate Rhythm and Balance With This New Tableware Range

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

Fou de Feu is a ceramic studio by Belgian designer Veerle Van Overloop. Her latest collection is called Rhythm and it’s clear to see why. Simple stripped-down ceramics is the order of the day as she mixes white porcelain with other materials such as wood, leather and marble. In doing this she has created an inspiring tableware range where the simplicity of her work and her combination of materials come together to form an effortlessly beautiful collection.

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

“Different sizes of plates, cups & spoons, tablemats and cutting boards give every table its own rhythm” says van Overloop. If she’s right, then her newest collection will no doubt offer everyone the opportunity to build their own harmonic arrangements at the dining-room table.

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

Found via the excellent This is Paper. You can see more from Fou de Feu here.

Philip Kennedy

September 18, 2014 / By

You’ve Never Seen a Clock Quite Like ‘A Million Times Project’ by Humans since 1982

A million Times Project, 2013

Per Emanuelsson and Bastian Bischoff founded their studio in 2009/2010 while they were both taking a Masters course at Gothenburg’s School of Design and Crafts. Realizing that they were both born in 1982, they chose Humans since 1982 as their name, then they found a studio to work from in Stockholm and they’ve been making work together ever since.

Perhaps their most exciting project to-date has been the ‘A Million Times Project’. Started last year, this project presents time in a way I’m sure you’ve never seen before. Graphically conceptual, their design combines engineering and mechanics to create an incredible kinetic installation that takes the arms of a traditional analogue clock and turns them into something new and exciting. Check out the video below to see what I mean.

Using 288 analogue clocks, the original work uses an iPad to create a series of wonderful visual patterns; playfully turning a collection of minimalist analogue clockfaces into a fully-functioning digital clock. Now a series, the duo have worked on a number of variations, with each piece being unique. They describe these creations as “objects unleashed from a solely pragmatic existence”. And in doing this I feel that they have discovered some wonderfully figurative qualities within their design without detracting from the clocks original function. It’s a pretty commendable achievement… and also it clearly looks amazing!

A million Times Project, 2013

A million Times Project, 2013

A million Times Project, 2013

See more projects from Humans since 1982 on their website.

Philip Kennedy

September 17, 2014 / By

Check Out Nicholas Hanna’s Incredible Bubble Devices

Nicholas Hanna

Artist Nicholas Hanna seems to have a real curiosity for life. He holds a Master of Architecture degree from Yale and an MFA in Media Arts from UCLA. A native of Canada, his work investigates the sensation of wonder and the essential relationship between humans and technology.

Nicholas Hanna

I love his Bubble Devices. These mechanical installations are almost as wide as a room and they create giant bubbles. They’re the sort of things that need to be seen to be believed so fortunately Hanna has shared some videos online:

Driven by a computer, Hanna’s automatic bubble wand is a fantastic construction and the lighting in the video really captures the beauty of these incredibly large bubbles.

You can see more projects from Nicholas Hanna on his website.

Philip Kennedy

September 16, 2014 / By

Watch An Entire Year of the Sky in Less Than Five Minutes

A History of the Sky

One of my favorite films this year has been Boyhood. Shot over a period of 12 years, it tells the story of Mason as his life unfolds during a period between the ages of 6 and 18. Before seeing the film I imagined that it must be a wonderful spectacle; that there must be something incredible about watching a person literally come-of-age on screen. In actuality, there is no real spectacle to Boyhood. If anything, that’s the real strength of the film. Real life is made up of small fleeting moments, and Boyhood captures these in a beautifully uncinematic way. In doing so, it captures something even greater than spectacle and in its subtly it reveals something more profound.

All of this is little more than preamble to introduce Ken Murphy’s “A History of the Sky”. This project is similar to Boyhood in that its premise seems suitably epic yet its lasting impression feels more poetic than astounding. A time-lapse film shot over the period of one year, Murphy reduces the ever changing skies of San Francisco into a mere 5 minute film.

“A History of the Sky enables the viewer to appreciate the rhythms of weather, the lengthening and shortening of days, and other atmospheric events on an immediate aesthetic level: the clouds, fog, wind, and rain form a rich visual texture, and sunrises and sunsets cascade across the screen.” says the self-described programmer, artist, and tinkerer. I think it’s wonderful!

Philip Kennedy

September 15, 2014 / By

Michael Wolf Photographs The Shadows of Trees In A Film Noir Style

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Sometimes I forgot how beautiful simple things can be. I think that is one of the best things about art; it can really remind you of the beauty that exists in the simple things and the mundane parts of life. That’s what I love about this series by the German-born photographer Michael Wolf. Shot on the streets of Paris, the work shows little more than the shadows of trees set against the buildings of the street. Yet in his composition and his high-contrast black-and-white he manages to find something effortlessly beautiful in something so banal.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Wolf’s work is frequently interested in contemporary city life. His images of modern cities often feel far less inviting than the work shown here. Through his lens buildings reach near abstraction as they dominate everything around them and themes of voyeurism, privacy and detachment are often seen throughout his practice.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Wolf doesn’t offer an explanation to the meaning behind this work. Considering his previous projects one might view it as an exploration of natures challenged role within the city, or perhaps it could be seen as a study into the small traces of the natural world that remain within our busy cities. Personally I prefer to take a more romantic view of it and see it as a simple celebration of the mundane. For me, these images serve as a reminder that there exisits simple pleasures in the world and its important to take the time every-now-and-again to stop and appreciate these simple things.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

You can see more work from Wolf on his website.

Philip Kennedy

September 10, 2014 / By

Is This Relaxing? A Brutal Looking Sauna Made of Concrete and Steel

One Man Sauna by Modulorbeat

Modulorbeat’s One Man Sauna is a wonderfully strange construction found near the German city of Bochum. The work forms part of a research lab project called Borderlands which the architects have been working on since 2012. Borderlands examines the border and transit spaces of the city and attempts to see what role architecture can play in the development of these spaces.

One Man Sauna by Modulorbeat

One Man Sauna by Modulorbeat

This One Man Sauna is located on the site of an old abandoned factory and stands at nearly 25 feet. Built from old building shafts, the sauna consists primarily of three stacked pre-cast concrete parts. These form three different unique layers on the inside: a plunge pool at the bottom, a sauna on the middle level and a relaxation room and viewing area at the top.

One Man Sauna by Modulorbeat

One Man Sauna by Modulorbeat

One Man Sauna by Modulorbeat

Go check out Modulorbeat’s website for more exciting work.

Philip Kennedy

September 8, 2014 / By

Google+