‘Divers’, A short animation by Paris Mavroidis

'Divers', A short animation by Paris Mavroidis

'Divers', A short animation by Paris Mavroidis

This week in Dublin I’ve been spending most of my free time enjoying our annual film festival. There’s nothing quite like throwing caution to the wind and seeing a bunch of films you normally wouldn’t get the chance to see anywhere else. Over the years, I’ve been to a number of film festivals and one of my favorite screenings was an evening of animated shorts curated by the Irish/UK collective Synth Eastwood. It was during this screening that I got to see Paris Mavroidis’s wonderful short, Divers.

Paris describes the film as an experimental animation and says that he was inspired by Busby Berkeley, mass gymnastics and experimental cinema from the 20s and 30s. Created while he pursued an MFA in Digital Arts at Pratt, the film is a wonderful slice of animation and I also reckon that it fits rather nicely with the Niki & The Dove video I posted earlier this week.

Philip Kennedy

February 23, 2012 / By

Beautiful music posters by Timothy Farrell

Laura Marling poster by Tim Farrell

ASIWYFA poster by Tim Farrell

LaFaro poster by Tim Farrell

I discovered the work of Timothy Farrell through his sharp editorial design for the Belfast-based AU magazine. I was intrigued to see more of what he does, so I checked out his portfolio and I’m happy to say that the rest of his work doesn’t disappoint. I could really share any number of his projects with you but it’s his music posters that really caught my eye.

Crisp, clean and beautiful imagery – Tim’s posters are the type of thing you’d love to buy at the merch-stand of your favorite band. I’m particularly fond of his poster for Laura Marling’s Summer tour, which you can see at top. Not only is it a beautiful image, but I think it translates the feeling of Marling’s music quite well. The image was also rolled out across t-shirts and tote bags, which I can imagine worked nicely as well.

You can check out more of what Tim does online here.

Philip Kennedy

February 22, 2012 / By

‘These pixels are making me thirsty’ – A Seinfeld Tribute by Nathan Manire

'These pixels are making me thirsty' - A Seinfeld Tribute by Nathan Manire

'These pixels are making me thirsty' - A Seinfeld Tribute by Nathan Manire

'These pixels are making me thirsty' - A Seinfeld Tribute by Nathan Manire

I’m a big Seinfeld fan so when I saw Nathan Manire’s excellent tribute to the iconic 90’s television series I couldn’t help but share it! It’s a great-looking print, and trying to spot all the references that it makes is a lot of fun.

Nathan is a graphic-designer and illustrator from Michigan who currently lives and works in New York. His portfolio has a number of interesting projects in it, including some really nice portraiture which is also well worth checking out.

The print above is currently for sale through his website and I think its title, ‘These pixels are making me thirsty’ really deserves some kudos! If ever the title of a print needed to be screamed out loud in your best George Costanza impersonation, it’s this one!

Philip Kennedy

February 21, 2012 / By

Wintr’s video for ‘The Fox’ by Niki & The Dove

Niki & The Dove - The Fox

Niki & The Dove - The Fox

Swedish electric duo Niki & The Dove recently released a video for their latest track The Fox, and it really is a thing of beauty. Created by the Seattle-based Wintr and filled with beautiful shapes, color and motion, the video shows a creature with the head of a fox in free-fall as it hurls towards the ground.

It’s a simple (if surreal) concept, but Wintr keep it totally engaging, filling it with all sorts of odd and crazy imagery. I’m normally not one to get too excited about videos that feel overtly 3D or are synthetic heavy but this really works and I think it’s well worth checking out.

Philip Kennedy

February 20, 2012 / By

‘Les Curiosités’ by Graziella Antonini

'Les Curiosités' by Graziella Antonini

'Les Curiosités' by Graziella Antonini

'Les Curiosités' by Graziella Antonini

'Les Curiosités' by Graziella Antonini

'Les Curiosités' by Graziella Antonini

Swiss photographer Graziella Antonini has a fascinating collection of photographs on her site. Her images create a wonderful dialogue amongst themselves, and it’s hard not to draw relationships between the photographs she takes. Her series Les Curiosités (The Curiosities) really captures my attention.

For Antonini, the series is about creating imaginary paths between the images. They represent animals, vegetables and minerals, yet without having a geographical reference for them, it becomes difficult to read them contextually. In her description of the work she asks: “Qu’est-ce qui est vrai et qu’est-ce qui ne l’est pas?” – What is true and what is not? Together, these images form a curious collection of photographs, a series which I find to be both unusual and enchanting.

Philip Kennedy

February 17, 2012 / By

Beautiful Illustrations from Jacqui Lee’s ‘The Story of Joseph-Armand Bombardier’

The Story of Joseph-Armand Bombardier by Jacqui Lee

The Story of Joseph-Armand Bombardier by Jacqui Lee

The Story of Joseph-Armand Bombardier by Jacqui Lee

These beautiful illustrations are taken from Canadian illustrator Jacqui Lee’s children’s book The Story of Joseph-Armand Bombardier. The book tells the story of the Canadian inventor Joseph-Armand Bombardier, a mostly self-taught inventor who is famous for pioneering the development of the snowmobile. Coming across Jacqui Lee’s book was the first time that I had heard of Bombardier and he sounds like a really fascinating character. For example, in 1922 – at the age of just fifteen – he built his first prototype snowmobile.

I also really love Jacqui Lee’s style of illustration and I particularly like the notion of a biographical book aimed at children. Her use of inks and watercolors are also really nice, which work really well with the feel of the book. Make sure to take a look at her online portfolio where you’ll find more work which is well worth checking out.

Philip Kennedy

February 15, 2012 / By

The Surreal & Dark Paintings of Alex Gross

Alex

Alex Gross - The Tragedy

Alex Gross - Signals

I’ve seen the paintings of Alex Gross before. You probably have, too. One sits on the cover of the Blonde Redhead’s album 23. Another can be seen looking bug-eyed on the front of Haruki Murakami’s After Dark. They’re haunting chunks of pop surrealism and as an introduction to the bizarreness of Gross’ style, they seem to only skim the surface.

Alex Gross is originally from New York, but he now lives and works in LA. For me, his style of work sits well with the Lowbrow art movement of the city. His oil paintings are creepy, and at times, almost garish – and yet I find them to be captivating and intriguing. He’s a talented painter and his work seems to be both informed by and commenting on how our visual culture has become so consumed by globalization and capitalism. Much of what he paints seems to laugh back at our perceived notions of beauty and art and by doing so he creates unsettling images that are dark and twisted. Why not take a look at more of his work online here?

As a side-note for those in New York who wish to see more of Gross’s work, his new solo show entitled Product Placement opens at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery on Feb 25th.

Philip Kennedy

February 14, 2012 / By

‘Mustavalkeaa (Soita mulle I)’ by Regina

'Mustavalkeaa (Soita mulle I)' by Regina

'Mustavalkeaa (Soita mulle I)' by Regina

A few years ago, my girlfriend and I spent a month traveling through southern Scandinavia. It was one of those great trips. The weather was amazing, the cities were perfect, and the music was pure indie-pop. It’s the type of sound which the Scandinavians do so well. Take Finnish indie-pop trio Regina, for example. I recently discovered them when browsing through the excellent Pitchfork TV and I’ve had them on steady rotation for the rest of the day.

Not only do they sound great, but their videos take me right back to that summer I spent backpacking around the sunny Nordic countryside. Their sound reminds me of a more dream-pop version of Stereolab, and I love the fact that they sing in their native Finnish. The video above is part one of a three-part series filmed by Osma Harvilahti, and part two is available on the band’s Vimeo page. They videos are nicely shot and suit the fun feel of the music. I’m looking forward to part three already.

Philip Kennedy

February 13, 2012 / By

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