Cinemascapes by Aaron Hobson

Saint-Nicolas-de-la-Grave, France by Aaron Hobson

Dearagon, Spain by Aaron Hobson

Valedeon by Aaron Hobson

Huautla, Mexico by Aaron Hobson

American photographer Aaron Hobson took each of the photos above without ever having to leave his house. The images come from a larger body of work entitled Cinemascapes. They are images which he describes as “close quarter panoramic” and “open ended narrative”. This is the final part of that series and Hobson has called this chapter ‘The Google Street View Edition’. As you’ve guessed, each of these photographs have been captured on Google Street View. Hobson describes these images as being:

…in search of enchanted and remote lands typically only reserved for the eyes of it’s inhabitants, but now are captured on camera by the automated and aesthetically-neutered google street view cars that linger.

It’s a beautiful set of images and Hobson has executed this innovative idea perfectly, proving that beauty can be found in the strangest of places. You can view the complete set of Cinemascapes: The Google Street View Edition on Hobson’s site here.

[via Nicholas Felton]

Philip

Philip Kennedy

December 2, 2011 / By

‘Somewhere in the Middle of Nowhere’ by Chris Sisarich

Somewhere in the Middle of Nowhere by Chris Sisarich

Somewhere in the Middle of Nowhere by Chris Sisarich

Somewhere in the Middle of Nowhere by Chris Sisarich

New Zealander photographer Chris Sisarich took these photographs while on an assignment in Egypt. At the time he was shooting a tourism campaign, but every moment that he had free he would turn his lens onto these incredible empty landscapes. I love how these barren views show the hostility of the desert, as well as the surrealisim of the marks left by man.

Sisarich summarizes these images particularly well:

It was hard to tell whether I’m looking at all that’s left after a futile attempt at taming the desert, or witnessing the first tentative steps towards creating somewhere people can live. These are spaces defined by their negative space, blessed with light – which is sliding in from all directions.

For me, these pictures look more like photos from a science-fiction film then anything on Earth. The complete set is called ‘Somewhere in the Middle of Nowhere’ and it can be viewed here.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 30, 2011 / By

The Surreal Portraits of Loretta Lux

The Waiting Girl by Loretta Lux

The Dove by Loretta Lux

Hugo and Dylan 2 by Loretta Lux

Loretta Lux is a photographer whose work instantly grabs your attention. I was flicking through an old journal of mine when I came across one of her images and it has stuck with me all day. Her portraits of children are as beautiful as they are unsettling, and as mesmerizing as they are eerie.

Lux is originally from Dresden but now living and working in Monaco. She creates her photographs with a combination of techniques including paining and digital manipulation. As times it can take her up to three months to produce a single image. For me, there’s a Norman Rockwell quality in her work and yet where Rockwell imbues his images with humor, Lux’s photographs seem far more restrained.

The way in which each photograph is manipulated means that her portraits fall into the uncanny valley, and from here the viewer begins to question whether or not these children are actually real. Personally I believe that they feed into that sub-genre of horror that plays on a ‘fear of children’. It’s not too hard to draw a connection between the images above and that of say Damien in the Omen or the famous twins seen in The Shining. Then again, perhaps that reading says far more about me then it does of Lux’s work. Maybe judge for yourself and check out the rest of her work online here

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 29, 2011 / By

‘Too Little, Too Late’ by Fotoshop

Fotoshop

Jarno-Erik Faarinen is a musician and producer from Finland who records under the name of Fotoshop. The other day he contacted me to let me know that he’d just released his debut album Lifeforms, and I’ve been listening to it ever-since! Faarinen’s sound sits somewhere between M83 and Washed Out, and although he channels a number of familiar reference points he manages to create something truely unique and exciting along the way.

The album’s opener Too Little, Too Late demonstrates exactly what Fotoshop does so well. His combination of vocals, beats and disoriented synths layer together to construct a slow-building anthem that holds a terrific synth-beat that just rips right through the whole track. Faarinen’s vocals are particularly nice, adding a shoegazer effect to the whole thing. Lifeforms is available for download from Fotoshop’s bandcamp page and it comes highly recommended.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 28, 2011 / By

The Luminous Landscapes of Graham Crowley

Graham Crowley Painting

Graham Crowley Painting "Road Kill"

Graham Crowley 'Rose Cloud Shadow'

For a number of years the English painter Graham Crowley has been creating these striking paintings inspired by the landscape of Rineen on the west coast of Ireland. Often described as “one of the most distinguished living painters in the UK today”; Crowley is a painter’s painter – an artist completely caught up in the world of paint. He is an artist whose work can be read as reflections on what it means to be a painter, and particularly to be a painter who is living and working at the start of the 21st century.

One part of Crowley’s practice that I find particularly interesting is how, over the last 20 years, he has completely changed his style. His landscapes of Rineen look almost unrecognizable when compared with the work he had been producing during the 70s and 80s. This idea of an artist changing their style is something which has been discussed on this site before, and it is something which I find really interesting.

In an interview with a-n Magazine in 2010, I was delighted to read Crowley’s response when asked about this change in style. “It’s only right that [these paintings] should be different to those that I made when I was 26″ he says, “I’m a different person.” Crowley also talks about how his work isn’t wrapped up or guided by what he describes as ‘product identity’, he just creates what he feels he should be creating. If people feel that this might betray his market identity, then so what “..if that’s all they’re worried about then tough”.

It’s refreshing to read of an artist of Crowley’s calibre who still just cares about staying true to their own creative voice and who are willing to change creatively as they change as a person. You can view more of Crowley’s work (including images of earlier work) online here.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 23, 2011 / By

Time Twister – Hans Andersson’s LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

I’ve a lot of love for LEGO, and so when I saw Swedish programmer Hans Andersson‘s Time Twister clock I just knew I’d have to share it. His creation is noisy, slow and indeed the epitome of chunkiness, and yet it’s a beautiful creation.

For me, the raw simplicity of Andersson’s design is really attractive and the way in which his creation goes about slowly-revealing each of it’s digits is almost hypnotic. When I watched the video above, showing his design in motion, I was shocked at how much anticipation and excitement I felt just simply watching the time being revealed.

Hans has also built some other amazing creation including two puzzle-solving robots which are pretty incredible. One can solve sudokus and an other one can solve a rubik’s cube. Both are well worth checking out.

Via Incredible Things

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 22, 2011 / By

‘Two Rings’ by Ice Choir

Ice Choir

Don’t ask me why, but there’s certainly an 80′s technopop revival going on, and let’s be honest, that’s no bad thing! Over the last few months this blog has featured tracks from the likes of Washed Out, Geoffrey O’Conner and College, each of whom have been channeling the 80′s in their own unique synth-inspired ways. Today I’d like to add the Brooklyn-four piece Ice Choir to that list and share with you their first single Two Rings which they released just last week.

Coming across like a mixture of New Order, Pet Shop Boys and Tears for Fears – Ice Choir is the personal project of The Pains of Being Pure at Heart member Kurt Feldman. Their track Two Rings features some sweet vocals and some terrific icy synths. It is the first single from their as-yet-untitled debut album which is due out next year. The single is available to buy as a limited-edition pressing here.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 21, 2011 / By

‘Let’s Go Out For A Ride!’ by Tatsuro Kiuchi

'Let's Go Out For A Ride!' by Tatsuro Kiuchi

'Let's Go Out For A Ride!' by Tatsuro Kiuchi

'Let's Go Out For A Ride!' by Tatsuro Kiuchi

'Let's Go Out For A Ride!' by Tatsuro Kiuchi

I love the work of Japanese illustrator Tatsuro Kiuchi. Above are a few of the illustrations taken from his 2009 children’s book Let’s Go Out For A Ride. It looks like a really wonderful book. It tells the story of a boy and his father who take a day trip to the top of a mountain and on their they ride on various forms of public transport. Not only are Kiuchi’s wood-cut illustrations beautiful, but they’re also busy with activity – the kinds of images you’d spend all day getting lost in as a kid.

‘Lets Go Out For A Ride’ is only one of a number of great projects on Kiuchi’s site. I also really adore his illustration work for the The Folio Society’s edition of Iris Murdoch’s The Sea, The Sea which you should take a look at. You can view the complete collection of his work online here.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 18, 2011 / By

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