This old cabin hides a contemporary dream home

Linescio cabin by Buchner Bründler Architekten

Sometimes things aren’t always what they seem. This 200 year old stacked stone house in Linescio, Switzerland has been discretely gutted on the inside by Buchner Bründler Architekten, turned into a simplistic dream space, perfectly formed in concrete. My favorite detail is the sleeping space above the fireplace which allows the concrete to gather ambient heat from the fire and keep you warm at night. Brilliant, right?

Linescio cabin by Buchner Bründler Architekten

Bobby Solomon

February 11, 2014 / By

Joris Brouwers and Nicky Zwaan’s incredible Amsterdam home

Joris Brouwers & Nicky Zwaan's IJburg dream home

Making a home truly your’s is a very personal process. In most cases it means arranging your belongings in a certain way or painting rooms a color you love. For home owners Joris Brouwers and Nicky Zwaan it meant taking matters into their own hands; designing, building, and furnishing their house themselves. The final home certainly stands out from the block, as you can see above, and the inside is like a secret getaway you want to explore.

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Bobby Solomon

January 14, 2014 / By

A Celebration of Architecture in Cinema in Federico Babina Poster Series ‘Archicine’

Federico Babina - Archicine

I’m not normally a fan of re-imagined movie posters that take a minimalist slant but I must admit that I quite like this series created by the Barcelona-based illustrator and architect Federico Babina. Entitled Archicine, the series takes a number of iconic buildings from cinema and turns them into vintage-looking posters. It’s a series that presents a wonderful overview of architecture on screen and Federico’s style lends a beautiful crisp and clean aesthetic to the buildings of the silver-screen.

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Philip Kennedy

December 2, 2013 / By

An in-depth look at the architecture of Eero Saarinen

An in-depth look at the architecture of Eero Saarinen

Alan Taylor runs In Focus, a special section of The Atlantic which looks at topics and events through large, beautiful photos. Last week he had a special feature on modernist architect Eero Saarinen, who helped bring a sense of futurism to a world of cookie cutter buildings. The feature is a series of 44 images which shows the range and talent of Saarinen, from his work on the Saint Louis Gateway Arch to the Trans World Airlines Terminal at John F. Kennedy Airport.

An in-depth look at the architecture of Eero Saarinen

An in-depth look at the architecture of Eero Saarinen

Bobby Solomon

November 26, 2013 / By

Noritaka Minami’s ‘1972’, an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

The Nakagin Capsule Tower, designed by Kisho Kurokawa, opened in March of 1972 as an ideal for architecture, allowing for a flexible capsule based system that would change and grow over time. Unfortunately the idea never really stuck and these capsules, meant to last around 25 years, are still in use to this day. Photographer Noritaka Minami has created a photo series titled 1972 which explores the Capsule Tower, giving insight into the decaying building.

This prototype for a new lifestyle for the 21st Century ultimately proved to be an exception rather than the rule. The Nakagin Capsule Tower in fact became the last of its kind completed in the world. Furthermore, the building has never undergone the process of regeneration during the 40 years of existence. None of the original capsules have ever been replaced, even though Kurokawa intended them to sustain a lifespan of only 25 years. As the capsules accumulate patina on their shells through the passage of time, they exist as a reminder of a future imagined to be possible at that moment in Japan as well as a future that never came.

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Bobby Solomon

November 13, 2013 / By

Intricate model of the upcoming Apple Campus designed by Foster + Partners

Intricate model of the upcoming Apple Campus designed by Foster + Partners

The Mercury News has a great slideshow featuring the upcoming Apple Campus which was designed by Foster + Partners. Apple is still waiting on a final vote from the Cupertino city council, but if it’s approved the 175-acre site that’s now 80 percent asphalt and buildings will turn into one that’s 80 percent open space and parkland, with a giant aluminum ring laying gently amongst it all. The model certainly helps to illustrate the immensity of the project and hopefully it’ll start development soon.

You can read more about the building and grounds by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

October 14, 2013 / By

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