Noritaka Minami’s ’1972′, an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

The Nakagin Capsule Tower, designed by Kisho Kurokawa, opened in March of 1972 as an ideal for architecture, allowing for a flexible capsule based system that would change and grow over time. Unfortunately the idea never really stuck and these capsules, meant to last around 25 years, are still in use to this day. Photographer Noritaka Minami has created a photo series titled 1972 which explores the Capsule Tower, giving insight into the decaying building.

This prototype for a new lifestyle for the 21st Century ultimately proved to be an exception rather than the rule. The Nakagin Capsule Tower in fact became the last of its kind completed in the world. Furthermore, the building has never undergone the process of regeneration during the 40 years of existence. None of the original capsules have ever been replaced, even though Kurokawa intended them to sustain a lifespan of only 25 years. As the capsules accumulate patina on their shells through the passage of time, they exist as a reminder of a future imagined to be possible at that moment in Japan as well as a future that never came.

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Bobby Solomon

November 13, 2013 / By

Intricate model of the upcoming Apple Campus designed by Foster + Partners

Intricate model of the upcoming Apple Campus designed by Foster + Partners

The Mercury News has a great slideshow featuring the upcoming Apple Campus which was designed by Foster + Partners. Apple is still waiting on a final vote from the Cupertino city council, but if it’s approved the 175-acre site that’s now 80 percent asphalt and buildings will turn into one that’s 80 percent open space and parkland, with a giant aluminum ring laying gently amongst it all. The model certainly helps to illustrate the immensity of the project and hopefully it’ll start development soon.

You can read more about the building and grounds by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

October 14, 2013 / By

Fantastic miniature pavilions from The Mini Paper Pavilion Club

The Modernist’s Mountain Pavilion

This is such a neat project! The Miniature Paper Pavilion Club are a collective based in Vancouver who meets biweekly to build ~1:100 scale architectural pavilions. It’s such a fun little idea and their resulting work is terrific.

“We are interested in creating imaginary celebrative public spaces” they say on their website, adding that these miniature buildings are “beacons to all humankind, elevating the wonder of innovation and excellence!” … I couldn’t put it better myself!

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Philip Kennedy

September 6, 2013 / By

Forgotten Homes in Chris Mottalini’s Poignant Series ‘After You Left, They Took It Apart’

Chris Mottalini - After You Left

After You Left, They Took It Apart is the title of a series of images taken by the New York based photographer Chris Mottalini. Showing a collection Paul Rudolph-designed homes just before they were to be demolished, the series took Mottalini almost seven years to complete and presents a poignant picture of mid-century modernism at the end of its life.

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Philip Kennedy

August 28, 2013 / By

Barrow Cabins: Hunting Cabins in Alaska by Eirik Johnson

Barrow Cabins by Eirik Johnson 1a

Barrow Cabins by Eirik Johnson 1b

Barrow Cabins is the name of a collection of photographs by the Seattle-based photographer and mixed-media artist Eirik Johnson. Presented as a series of diptychs, the images show summer and winter views of small hunting cabins built by the Iñupiat inhabitants of Barrow, Alaska. Located just 320 miles north of the Arctic Circle, Barrow is a mere 1300 miles south of the North Pole and is the largest city of the North Slope Borough.

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Philip Kennedy

July 15, 2013 / By

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