‘Street’, Filmed by C. R. Stecyk III

'Street', Filmed by C. R. Stecyk III

'Street', Filmed by C. R. Stecyk III

'Street', Filmed by C. R. Stecyk III

The goodness from Art In The Streets doesn’t stop pouring in, it’s pretty incredible all the things they’re doing. This here is a video detailing the Street Market, which was the brainchild by Steven Powers, REAS and Barry McGee, and probably my favorite part of the show. If you’re not going to get a chance to see the show, this is probably the best way to see it. The video was shot by the famous C. R. Stecyk III, who you’d know from the Z-Boys and Dogtown scene. He’s done a really great job of documenting the space, getting all the nitty gritty details and dirty corners that you might have missed. Be sure to watch this full screen.

Directors: Andy Bruntel & Felipe Lima
DP: C. R. Stecyk III
Producers: Bret Nicely & Jett Steiger
Camera: Larkin Donley
Sound: Owen Granich-Young

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

June 9, 2011 / By

ROA Hits Up Chicago

ROA Hits Up Chicago

ROA Hits Up Chicago

ROA Hits Up Chicago

ROA Hits Up Chicago

ROA Hits Up Chicago

Among graffiti nerds, Chicago’s not especially known for having a strong can culture for several reasons. Spray can sales were verboten in city limits way back in the 80s, which in the days before online shopping, meant a 2+ hour trip (less if you can snag a car) to the suburbs to procure it. Further, the fines and penalties are still so steep that most are deterred. And the city has on several occasions swooped in and buffed out commissioned graffiti murals on private property. Not exactly a positive environment for this particular type of expression.

So it’s a promising sign that there’s an obvious uptick over the last few years in street art in general here. Brand new and brilliant work from Belgian street artist ROA went up just days ago in two locations, thanks to Pawn Works & the Hedrich Blessing Photographers. Having seen the rams first hand (Kinzie & Peoria for you locals) they are a massive sight to behold. Pushing 90 feet long, the piece fills the entire building’s wall. And all spray can too. Hot damn.

By far the best part of ROA’s animal subjects is how they are tucked in the architecture, almost caught in a moment. Seeing one feels just like that moment when you happen to spy an interesting animal in its natural habitat. They are the urban replica of the real thing. Very happy to have these marvelous beings, I hope they stick around for awhile.

More ROA amazingness on Unurth. Photos by Unurth & Brock Bake.

Margot

June 6, 2011 / By

World Premiere of Alex Stapleton’s ‘OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets’


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OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets is a great glimpse into the making of the current MOCA exhibit. When I saw the footage of Barry McGee and Stephen Powers painting and putting together their incredible installation at the museum I gained a whole new level of respect for them, especially since they created a majority of the pieces at the location. Swoon did the same thing with her team and it was awesome to see them on the ground with X-Acto blades.

The director even managed to interview REVOK before he was arrested for vandalism back in April. He’s now serving 120 days in jail with a $320,000 bail, an amount SABER pointed out as “over $100,000 more than OJ Simpson’s, and OJ was on trial for murder”. So, it was no surprise that the MSK crew were yelling at the screen whenever LAPD officers appeared on screen. In a candid moment towards the end of the film, Shepard Fairey talks about his family and what they think of his graffiti “My daughter knows to only talk to the police if she’s in trouble…not when when she’s putting up stickers”, an act that Shepard may or may not have perpetrated on the stalls of the men’s bathroom.

When the last credit rolled, Jonathan Wells, Programming Director of Levi’s Film Workshop and Executive Producer of the film, invited SABER, Mr. Cartoon, C.R. Stecyk III, Shepard Fairey, Patti Astor, Alex Stapleton, Neckface and exhibit curators Aaron Rose, Roger Gastman and Ethel Seno to come onstage for a Q&A. There was an awkward silence as the crowd built up enough courage to start asking questions like “Where do you get your paint from” to which Neckface replied “I started out stealing my shit…and I still steal my shit” – making us bust up laughing.

“I understand why people get frustrated by graffiti…If I caught some kid tagging my fence I’d knock him out, but if I didn’t catch him, I’d cross his name out first before I buffed it.” – Mr. Cartoon

By the end of the night we had met all of our rebel heroes, heard Shepard Fairey dj a set of punk and hip-hop, and had gotten a better perspective of all the hard work that went into putting Art in the Streets together.

A big thanks to the Levi’s Workshop for inviting us, and a congrats for making all of this happen. ALl of the videos were created at the Levi’s Workshop in the MOCA, where you can make videos or rent cameras for your own projects.

Daniel

Bobby Solomon

May 25, 2011 / By

Banksy at ‘Art In The Streets’

Banksy at 'Art In The Streets'

Banksy at 'Art In The Streets'

Banksy at 'Art In The Streets'

Banksy Press Release from 'Art In The Streets'

Click images to enlarge

One of the biggest surprises of Art In The Streets was the inclusion of Banksy, who I don’t think was mentioned on any of the publicity materials. Or maybe I just had no idea he was going to be there, either way, I was pleasantly surprised to see his work. It ended up being a mix of both older and newer work, as well as several old stencils that are almost iconic with the idea of Banksy, much like the ‘Andre the Giant Has A Posse’ sticker and Shepard Fairey. Randomly, he also included the piece of paper above, which was sitting on the giant, bloody flattening machine, which gives some important information about his part of the show.

First is the fact that his part is an ongoing project, and will shift and change as the exhibit goes on… or he may have just been late. It also describes that the giant cathedral tag window was done in collaboration with the City of Angels school, showcasing the work of a ton of kids. It also notes that the taxidermy dog was not killed by Banksy, it was found in a freezer, so don’t get all crazy about that part. Overall I thought his section was really great, I definitely spent a little while looking at his pieces and smiling. Maybe Banksy isn’t getting boring…?

Click the link below to see the rest of the photos.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 27, 2011 / By

The Street Market at ‘Art In The Streets’ at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Steven Powers at The Street Market at 'Art In The Streets' at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

Click images to enlarge

I have so many photos from Art In The Streets that I’m still trying to get all the photos edited and put together, it’s quite a process. These images are of the Street Market, a recreation of an exhibit that was originally at Deitch Gallery back in 2000. I was only 18 when the gallery originally was created so it was an amazing treat to get to walk through this amazing exhibit with an exhibit. It’s made up of pieces from Steven Powers (who you can see with Kyle in the photo above), who also goes by ESPO, Todd James, who’s also know as REAS, and one of my all-time favorites Barry McGee, whom you might know as Twist. These guys have created an entire city block covered in art.

This was one of the first things that I experienced when I got into the space, and it was overwhelming in the best way possible. There’s just so much to process that you’re walking through with your mouth open, or that was my reaction, at least. I just can’t believe they were able to reconstruct such an immense work. It’s not identical by any means, but it’s still the same in spirit and that’s what’s important.

I’ve got 58 photos under the cut, all of which you can see larger versions of. I encourage and implore you to take the time and look at all the insane details that went into this space. I hope you enjoy the photos.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 25, 2011 / By

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