Interview with a Painter: Erik Olson

ErikOlsonPainting

The first time I came across Erik Olson’s work was when my sister showed me an image she had found online, it had no credit and wasn’t linked to the original painter. I put on my detective hat and set about tracking it down, doing a reverse image search that lead me to Canadian Painter Erik Olson. It’s something about the way his subjects are suspended within these bold backgrounds and the frenzied and warped feature, as if they’ve been framed in some sort of swirl and blur movement, that struck me and when the time came to put together a list of creatives I wanted to talk to; he was high up on my list.

I was also fascinated by his first solo show that was held in an abandoned gas station, I love this kind of ingenuity and it is this attitude that, it seems, has got the ball rolling for him and has seen him exhibited across Canada, America and even a spot in the UK.

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Michael Arnold

September 19, 2013 / By

Toilet Paper is a Publication You Won’t Want to Flush Down the Drain

ToiletPaper-Magazine-0

Toilet Paper is perhaps the most bizarre, shocking, and borderline-subversive publication I’ve ever picked up… And I love it. A bi-annual magazine, it’s the child of (super-talented) artist Maurizio Cattelan and photographer Pierpaolo Ferrari. I highly recommend any self-respecting creative to pick one up, as my words can hardly do their work justice. It’s simply an experience you have to hold in your hands and observe with your own eyes. But that doesn’t mean I’m not stubborn enough to try (heh).

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Nick Partyka

September 12, 2013 / By

The Pencil Drawings of Kate Copeland

Kate Copeland - Speedway

A couple weeks ago illustrator Kate Copeland launched a new website, so I thought today I’d share with you a small selection of her work. Using traditional pencil and watercolor, Kate has created illustrations for a number of clients including the likes of Sagmeister & Walsh, The Times, Wallpaper* and Port Magazine. I’m a sucker for this type of black and white imagery and Kate is particularly talented at creating bold and striking images with precision and clarity.

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Philip Kennedy

September 11, 2013 / By

Dave Kinsey at FFDG

Street artist turned gallery artist Dave Kinsey has been a long time favorite of mine. Known for his bold works which combine tagging with abstract portraiture, Kinsey recently had a show at FFDG that was only up for two nights, but was filled with plenty of great work. It’s cool to see how complex and detailed his work has become while still maintaining his unique style.

Dave Kinsey at FFDG

Dave Kinsey at FFDG

Dave Kinsey at FFDG

Bobby Solomon

September 10, 2013 / By

Artist Erik Söderberg Plays With Geometric Shapes and Organic Chaos

Erik Soderberg - fractalsmaximus

“Why do humans tend to prefer strict geometric design when nature seems to flow in a chaotic and organic way?”

That’s the question Swedish cross-media artist Erik Söderberg poses with this series of images. Exploring fractals, patterns and geometry in relation with chaos, flow and contrast, Erik’s work uses the phi ratio (1.618) as a golden mean to create his work.

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Philip Kennedy

September 9, 2013 / By

The Fox Is Black Print Picks

The Fox Is Black Poster Picks

The Fox Is Black Poster Picks

1. Russell Leng Print 1 by Russell Leng – $35
2. Aventurine Mix (No. 1) by Future Desert – $20
3. Whiskey Sour by Jack Hughes – £35
4. No Man’s Land by Lola Donoghue – $80
5. Lake by Sretan Bor – $80
6. English Bulldog and French Bulldog by Two Arms – $15 each
7. Bikeubic by Parisa Ghaderi
8. Humphrey Il – Blue by Barnaby Ward – $150
9. Doom Loop 16 by Tim Biskup
10. Icosahedron 1 by Carl Kleiner – 550 €
11. Mi casa es su casa by David Renó – $15
12. Cosmic Cat by Little Friends of Printmaking – $25

Bobby Solomon

September 6, 2013 / By

No monkeying around with Hiroshi Watanabe’s new photo series

Hiroshi Watanabe monkey photo

You can’t go wrong with pictures of clothed monkeys. You just can’t—the Internet is bound to eat that shit up. What otherwise sounds silly, has been tastefully executed by US-based photographer Hiroshi Watanabe, in an upcoming exhibit titled Suo Sarumawashi. I believe that Watanabe’s primate photography foray is not only eye-candy, but also matter for the creative mind too.

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Nick Partyka

September 5, 2013 / By

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