Craig Green’s tied, dyed, smothered, and covered S/S 2014 collection

Craig Green Spring Summer 2014 4

Not sure if people would agree but tie-dye feels like it’s back in. This isn’t the traditional entry that is for and by hippies but is instead new takes on dye born out of the resurge in popularity of indigo. Thus, the style is back but in through new, experimental ways.

London based artist and “fashion designer” Craig Green obviously feels this way as his Spring/Summer 2014 show is a collection of works that incorporate his “subdued” past of blacks and whites and smothering covers into new takes on dying. He has taken his own aesthetic, put it through a self-referential dye process, and ended up with the new collection.

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KYLE FITZPATRICK

February 7, 2014 / By

Dyami O’Brien’s amazing abstract portraits

Dyami O'Brien Painting 1

It’s a little difficult to explain the work of Dyami O’Brien. The artist paints warped portraits of people that exaggerate their physical characteristics while also addressing their personal style. They’re inspired by everything from soul records to Facebook pages, something we discovered while researching his work previously for Los Angeles, I’m Yours. If anything, O’Brien is an artist doing something totally unique.

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KYLE FITZPATRICK

February 5, 2014 / By

Skyler Brickley melts masses of plastic into abstract forms

Skyler Brickley

Skyler Brickley is a New York based artist who basically makes what looks like destroyed hoods from brightly colored cars from the future. He twists and punches through sheets of supposed metal that could be shipped off to a space junk yard. They are big and fascinating and definitely give you the feeling that his pieces are part of something larger. Maybe a Transformer molted, leaving behind this rippling sheet? No, not really: they’re actually made out of polyethylene terephthalate or FRP, complicated and sturdy plastics that—when painted with automotive paint—appear to be twisted metal.

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KYLE FITZPATRICK

February 4, 2014 / By

Love For Sale: Valentine’s inspired by Talking Heads

Love For Sale: Valentine's inspired by Talking Heads

I can’t say I associate Talking Heads with love. I associate Talking Heads with David Byrne shouting and making weird noises, funky bass lines, and influencing a generation of musicians. But not love. I might be in the minority though as Kate Bingaman-Burt, Will Bryant, and Frank Chimero are curating a show titled Love For Sale: Valentine’s inspired by Talking Heads.

The show has over 70 artists confirmed including Jessica Hische, Mark Weaver, Adi Goodrich, Erik Marinovich, Jennifer Daniel, Paul Windle, Jeremy Pelley (Official Mfg. Co.), Richard Perez (Skinny Ships), Rose Blake, Adam J. Kurtz, Jen Mussari, Rand Renfrow, Keetra Dean Dixon, and Berkley Illustration. That’s like everyone you follow on Twitter, right? You can see a sneak peek of the show over on the Love For Sale Tumblr where they’re posting up previews. My favorites are by Skinny Ships and Gemma Correll which you can see below.

The show opens February 13, so if you’re in the Portland area stop by!

Love For Sale - Skinny Ships

Love For Sale - Gemma Correll

Bobby Solomon

February 4, 2014 / By

3D printed vessels created from distorting algorithms

M Plummer Fernandez - Digital Natives

M Plummer Fernandez is a South East London artist who uses computers to push the boundaries of industrial design. I came across these pieces he made titled Digital Natives where 3D scanned a series of traditional objects and then abstracted and distorted them, turning them into new objects.

Everyday items such as toys and a watering can are 3D scanned using a digital camera and subjected to algorithms that distort, abstract and taint them into new primordial vessel forms. In some cases only close inspection reveals traces inherited from their physical predecessors. These are then 3D printed on a z-corp printer.

Vessels are arguably the lowest common denominator for man-made objects across all cultures, these objects however have no storage function other than to embody the stored digital data that describes them.

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Bobby Solomon

February 3, 2014 / By

Andrew Masullo’s Vibrant Abstract Paintings

Andrew Masullo

Andrew Masullo

Andrew Masullo is often described as ‘a painter’s painter’. His vibrant canvases might be small but they really do burst with a charming energy. Through his work, Masullo is interested in form, colour and composition and he has a real talent for striping these down to their purest elements and turning them into deceptively simple looking work. His skill for painting strange organic shapes is wonderful to see and the playful nature of what he creates is an absolute joy.

Born in New Jersey, Masullo studied at Rutgers and found success exhibiting in the East Villliage during the early 80s. Since then he’s conitiued to exhibit up and down America, taking part in group shows and solo exhibtions. In 2012 he showed at the Whitney Museum’s 2012 Biennial.

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Philip Kennedy

February 3, 2014 / By

Everything Is Everything By Koki Tanaka

Everything Is Everything Koki Tanaka

Koki Tanaka is a Japanese artist living in Los Angeles whose work is about manipulating normal objects. He doesn’t warp them into giant sculptures or use a ton of little things like buttons to make mosaics. He instead allows little moments of normalcy, small or big gestures to stand on their own as some sort of art. As was done with his 2012 reflective Beholding Performer, Performing Beholder and booming 2008 Then, a whole bunch of basins crash down to the floor of the Museum of Modern Art, he uses common objects for big reactions.

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KYLE FITZPATRICK

January 31, 2014 / By

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