Anthony Burrill’s “I Like It. What Is It?” Is A Book You’ll Tear Through (and Apart)

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Graphic artist, print-maker, and designer, Anthony Burrill, is famous for his persuasive form of communication. His most renowned works (plus a couple new ones) have been collected together and, as of last week, published within a book, I Like It. What Is It? Not just any ol’ordinary hardback, this is meant to be read, and then torn apart and hung on your wall. It’s a fun project, but also reminds us to the current state (and possible future) of design publication.

“Burrill is a great designer because he makes you notice and appreciate truths that would otherwise remain dead and inert. His work has such resonance because it’s so true: we should all work hard and be nice.”
—Alain de Botton

Very much like an author, Burrill is an artist who works with language. But, he has found a distinct voice through the presentation of his words. He prints ‘language’ into pieces of art, so one can read his work, but also visually admire it as well. His process of image making is born of tradition, largely employing hand-made methods (screen, press, woodblock, etc.).

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It’s a craft he takes seriously, working hard to select the perfect inks and papers to print his projects onto. It’s a dedication that pays off, you can sense the diligence by simply standing in front of or holding one of his works. It’s an aspect of Burrill that I’ve always appreciated, I never fail to fill of tenacity when I gaze into the pieces hung on my wall. Famous for pieces like “Work Hard & Be Nice to People,” Burrill’s style is now a highly recognizable one, so much so that publishing a book featuring his work is a no-brainer.

 

Consisting of 30 pieces (and sticker sets), the book is a tight little bundle, oozing aesthetic. Each design is printed on 355 x 279 mm stock, giving the book some weight and a sturdy feel. The backside of every design reveals the story behind the work. Flip through looking at cool project after cool project and learn a little something a long the way too. Not bad.

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As if that’s not enough already, each piece is removable. Awesome. The book is wrapped in a manner that they’re easily detachable, the intent being you can read this book, but also use it too, affixing the works to wherever your liking.

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In this month’s Creative Review, Mark Sinclair writes about the move of graphic design publications from traditional book formats to “products.” Paper-based creations, gifts, and new formats are appearing on shelves where books sit. It’s flushing a lot of money back into publication, as publishers are discovering new and creative ways to bring life back into the market. I welcome it, as products such as Burrill’s new book are well-thought, well-executed, and an evolution. I Like It. What Is It? is a Laurence King publication and designed by A Practice for Everyday Life. Kudos to these folks for pushing the medium.

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I’ve always wondered about the statements in Burrill’s work. They’re bold, they’re colorful, and often carry a lightness of touch and humor. But what exactly do they mean and where do they come from? Are these his beliefs? Quotes? Something has always urked me about not knowing the origin (and intent) of many of Burrill’s messages. I can rest easy knowing that my questions will be answered within this book. The tales on the backside of each page are written by Creative Review’s Patrick Burygone; there’s sure to be many creative insights and learnings to take away.

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I Like It. What Is It? is available for a mere £19.95. A steal, if you ask me. I’ve ordered two, one for the shelf, one to tear apart and hang all over the damn place. To coincide with the release of the book, an exhibition at London’s KK Outlet will be running November 8th to the 30th. If you’re London based (or planning a trip soon), be sure to swing by and soak up the wonderful work of Anthony Burrill.

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Nick Partyka

November 12, 2013 / By

Adam Silverman ‘Ceramics’

Adam Silverman 'Ceramics'

The rise of ceramics is slowly happening again. Perhaps neglected for a period or marginalized by the crafty/DIY movement of the 90s, ceramics is beginning to be treated as the serious, storied medium it is, and that’s partially impart to folks like Adam Silverman.

Silverman has had a varied life, finding major success as the co-founder of X-Large and X-Girl clothing labels in the 90s, and then in 2008 becoming the LA Studio Director for Heath Ceramics, a 62 year old California maker of dinnerware and tile. These two fields are about as disparate as you can get, but it shows Silverman’s true character, which is that of a creative that can defy limitations.

Adam Silverman 'Ceramics'

In September, Skira Rizzoli released a new book which showcases the work of Silverman and his unique take on the medium, simply titled Ceramics.

Adam Silverman is the face of a new generation of artists focused on ceramics and pottery, a medium that has not had major presence in the contemporary art world for many years. Incorporating traditional pottery techniques with his own experimental approach, Silverman creates works that are sensual, gritty, and beautiful. He uses unique glazes to give his pieces abstract lacy or gestural surfaces. Silverman has exhibited extensively and has a large, growing audience in the United States as well as in Japan, where his work is collected by Tadao Ando and Takashi Murakami, among many others. A breathtaking and informative overview of his work, Adam Silverman Ceramics is a landmark volume for all who appreciate ceramics, design, and modern sculpture as well as contemporary art.

As a special treat, I’ve been given a discount code when you order from the Heath Ceramics website which will give you 30% off the book. Not bad right? Simply use the code below and you’re all set.

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Adam Silverman 'Ceramics'

Adam Silverman 'Ceramics'

Adam Silverman 'Ceramics'

Bobby Solomon

November 6, 2013 / By

Alain de Botton’s ‘Art as Therapy’ Will Change How You View Art

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When a bestselling philosopher tells you that art is the most important thing in culture today, you’d best listen up. But which philosopher would ever make such a bold statement? Alain de Botton. I’ve been a fan of his writing for years now, but his most recent project is quickly becoming a favorite. Art As Therapy asks (and answers) the question “why art?” Last Friday I had the opportunity to attend a lecture delivered by Botton at NYC’s Cooper Union, where he talked about his new book (co-written with fellow philosopher and art historian, John Armstrong). This book happens to fit into a larger scheme of Botton’s, which when coupled together, has the potential to shake-up your conceptions of viewing art.

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Nick Partyka

October 23, 2013 / By

Carter Wong’s book ‘A Cycling Lexicon’ covers the overlooked art of bicycle badges

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It’s always a pleasure when two passions of mine come together in one. This time: cycling and design. Carter Wong of London, a reputable design studio, have recently released A Cycling Lexicon, which features a curated collection of bicycle head badges (the little emblems that adorn the front of your ride). It’s a pocket-sized book far too large to fit in your pocket; the hundreds of shields contained within will aid in garnering admiration for not only cycling, but this unique area of design too.

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Nick Partyka

October 14, 2013 / By

Is technology making us smarter? Clive Thompson thinks so.

I was reading this interview with Clive Thompson in the NY Times last night and he’s got a new book out called “Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better.” The book touches upon the idea that technology isn’t making you dumb, it’s actually supplementing the way our brains already work.

You talk a lot about memory in your book. Are we augmenting our memories with computers, or are we replacing them?

I would say we are augmenting them. When I started the book I was genuinely worried that I was losing my memory to Google, but the more I studied the way that everyday memory works, the more I realized how much we already rely on other outside sources — books, Post-it notes, etc. — but also other people to remember things. We are social thinkers, and we are also social rememberers, we use our co-workers, our partners and our friends to help us retrieve the details about things that they they are better at remembering than we are. And they’ve used us in the same way. Memory has always been social. Now we’re using search engines and computers to augment our memories, too.

The interview was good enough to get me to purchase the book, really looking forward to reading this. And how great is that cover? Simple but effective.

Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better

Bobby Solomon

September 25, 2013 / By

Fantastic Illustrated Book Covers by Chris Silas Neal

Chris Silas Neal - The Death of Bees

Chris Silas Neal - Trains and Lovers

These days I’ve found that bookshops have become my galleries and art museums. I’ll frequently visit old vintage book stores and high-street chains just to wander through their shelves and soak up all the cover art. They say “don’t judge a book by its cover”, but if you ask me, there’s few things more enjoyable then walking through a book store and guessing what lies just behind that striking image on the front.

One cover artist who has recently caught my eye is Chris Silas Neal. Based in Brooklyn, Chris has worked on a variety of projects over the years including posters, packaging, advertising, television and magazine work, but it’s his book covers that I think I love the most.

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Philip Kennedy

July 30, 2013 / By

Memories of a Suburban Utopia: The Work of Anton Van Hertbruggen

Anton Van Hertbruggen

Anton Van Hertbruggen is a hugely talented illustrator from Belgium. Last year he released a stunning concertina book called Memories of a Suburban Utopia and the second I saw it I knew I had to own it. Depicting a surreal modern suburb, Anton’s book is unlike anything I’ve seen before and his images look even more fantastic when printed in this scrolling concertina format.

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Philip Kennedy

July 10, 2013 / By

Enjoying the Dreamlike Career of Richard Matheson

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“In a world of monotonous horror there could be no salvation in wild dreaming.”

Richard Matheson passed away Sunday. We lost a good one. The 1958 Hugo Award winner might be one of the few people in the world to find such success in books, television, and film. At thirty-seven years old he released his first story in the long running Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Armed with a bachelor’s degree in journalism, he moved to California in 1951 and took to writing short stories and books.

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Alec Rojas

June 28, 2013 / By

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