Yohji Yamamoto and his avant garde spirit

Yohji Yamamoto and his avant garde spirit
Photo by Nicolas Guerin/Contour by Getty Images

I was reading an interview with Yohji Yamamoto over on the The Talks and found this particular part inspiring. Have you found something of your own?

I simply cannot stand people’s tendency to become conservative. There’s always a move back to established conventions, otherwise upcoming waves would be soon categorized as common sense. Even the term avant-garde – avant-garde is now just a tiny fashion category. It became so cheap and pretentious. I hate it. But still, I strongly believe in the avant-garde spirit: to voice opposition to traditional values. It is not just a youthful sentiment; I live my life by it. Rebellion. You will only be able to oppose something and find something of your own after traveling the long road of tradition.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

October 26, 2011 / By

RRL’s Take On 1920s Australian Mug Shots

RRL Mug Shots

RRL Mug Shots

RRL Mug Shots

RRL Mug Shots

Earlier this year, a collection of 1920s Australian mug shots surfaced and made the rounds on the Internet, where people were taken aback by how visually beautiful and even “cool” these mug shots looked. As you see above, there are a few of the 1920s mug shots and…a few impostors! Two of the above are actually shots from the current RRL lookbook. Can you spot which are authentic and which are imitation?

The rugged Ralph Lauren lifestyle brand currently features these looks on their website, showcasing this season’s styles for the brand. The concept is genius, as their aesthetic lends itself so brilliantly to their look. Of course these are admittedly a little silly as they are recycling an idea that was used to document criminals, but the execution of the idea in such a truly authentic looking manner is quite a feat. I really did have trouble figuring out which were from the 1920s and which were from 2011 when inserting these photos, but–if you haven’t figured it out already–the second and fourth photo are the impostors.

Catch more 1920s mug shot inspired photos on their website and, if you have a few extra Benjamins in your pocket, be sure to pick up some of the looks.

KYLE

KYLE FITZPATRICK

September 19, 2011 / By

Nothing Major, A New Lifestyle Brand Out of Chicago

Nothing Major

Nothing Major

Nothing Major

Nothing Major

Launched today by Chris Kaskie & my studiomate Mike Renaud, Nothing Major is a cheeky & irreverent line of artist-commissioned, gender neutral tees & accessories made with careful attention to quality, responsible production & aesthetic integrity. So many small details to fall in love with: surprising typography elements, a random pocket, or specific illustration style. I love the logo too, those chunky round serifs fell me every damn time. The website is well worth the trip, especially the extra-thoughtful section that features interviews with each of the contributing artists. I’m eagle eyeing that smart little tote bag! So many pockets it has!

Margot

September 9, 2011 / By

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

We live in a very interesting time where art and fashion are colliding to create some really stupid and some really interesting things. Yet, one era of art that is constantly getting beat down by its own nature is Pop Art. Low brow fashion retailers like Forever 21, H&M, and Urban Outfitters are constantly recycling the catalogues and concepts of Warhol and Lichtenstein for new t-shirt material, bringing nothing new to either the clothing nor the art beyond creating a bastardized cheap product.

Thankfully, people have stepped in to rectify what is happening to Pop Art and have even created new collisions with fashion and art. UK based fashion retailer Fred Perry has collaborated with living British Pop Artist legend, Peter Blake. Together they have have created a little collaboration entitled Blank Canvas, which ties Blake’s aesthetic with Perry’s rich polos as the “blank canvas.”

In the above video, Hint sits down with Blake himself to speak about Pop Art and its influence on fashion (particularly, British fashion). Blake has some really remarkable things to say, explaining his intention behind a lot of his imagery (the target being commentary on Jasper Johns’ Target), the Mod movement and its relationship to fashion, his work as an artist (and current work!), and how he has contributed to Pop Art. Blake is a fascinating man and is remarkably sharp and busy for a near octogenarian.

Although I must say the clothing coming out of the collaboration are not mind-blowing, they really are a great representative of Blake and Perry, two creators who have a distinct voice in the visual world. Take a minute and watch this interview with Blake and, by all means, pass it around to anyone who may in fact be bastardizing his visual lexicon for cheap fashion hounds.

KYLE

KYLE FITZPATRICK

August 25, 2011 / By

Rodarte for Opening Ceremony Fall 2011

Rodarte for Opening Ceremony Fall 2011

Rodarte for Opening Ceremony Fall 2011

Rodarte for Opening Ceremony Fall 2011

Rodarte for Opening Ceremony Fall 2011

A few days ago, I caught a bite sized article on New York Magazine’s The Cut about the new Rodarte for Opening Ceremony line. As always, Rodarte is constantly creating compelling, interesting, and beautiful clothing that seems to have been pulled from both the 19th century fashion world as well as the 25th century fashion world, then smashed together for wonderful clothes.

This combination in their new collection spins their trademark decaying garments with (sometimes disconnected) graphic patterns and the aesthetic of a woman in a Degas painting. The resulting pieces are, of course, very modern and surprisingly light. The womenswear are all composed from lightweight, crepe-like fabrics for their dresses and tops. Yet, although a decidedly lighter line, they still retain their gothic points with coats that look like something a crow would wear and deep, blood red stockings. It seems that, when they aren’t using a Degas-like graphic pattern for the collection, they are in fact updating and beautifying the woman in his The Absinthe Drinker or the women in his Women On A Cafe Terrace.

The Mulleavy sisters are also bringing some great things to menswear, my favorite being the shirt seen in the top photo which–again–seems to be sampling from Degas’ visual vocabulary. Being as they’ve only been doing menswear for a little less than two years, the efforts in their newest collection are very well done: wonderful shirts, smart pants, smart suit jackets–very Rodarte, while not being Rodarte. I’m very interested to see where they keep heading with their menswear as this is, you know, not whole-y (or holy?) sweaters as they had previously been offering men.

If you’d like to see more of their looks, take a peek at their official Facebook page. You can preview the collection with only the admission of a Like. And, for larger photos, take a hop over We Are Selecters, where I grabbed these photos from.

KYLE

KYLE FITZPATRICK

August 12, 2011 / By

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