Flora Drift Turns Your Browser Into A Synthesizer

Flora Drift

British designer Luke Twyman gave himself a 48 hour challenge: to create a simple web-based generative project. By the end of it he realized that he’d made something pretty rad and decided to put more work into it. What came out of that effort was a project called Flora Drift, which uses procedural generation to create ambient music on the fly and to generate a new jungle/garden scene every 2 bars of music. Essentially the code sets a bunch of rules, then uses randomization to make decisions on how the music & visuals get created. Your browser becomes the synthesizer.

Bobby Solomon

July 10, 2014 / By

‘Strange Plants’ Looks At Plants and Their Relationship To Contemporary Art

'Strange Plants' Looks At Artists and Their Lives With Plants

I happen to love plants. I have a giant shelf of them in my apartment, I love visiting nurseries on the weekends, and you’ll often find me Instagram’ing beautiful flowers and palm trees in my day-to-day. Thus a book like Strange Plants is right up my alley. Editor Zio Baritaux has put together three groups of creatives to give their takes on plants: artists who primarily work with plants as a medium, those who don’t normally work with plants who created new works, as well as a group of tattoo artists who’ve created works with plants in mind.

“The artists in this book were challenged to think about their work in new ways and ruminate on their unique experiences with plants,” editor Zio Baritaux says. “I hope this book will inspire others, and challenge the way people look at both plants and art.”

'Strange Plants' Looks At Artists and Their Lives With Plants

Strange Plants was designed by Folch Studio, an award-winning design house in Barcelona, which also developed Apartamento magazine. Folch was engaged in all aspects of the design and production of Strange Plants, and created a delicate and tactile cover inspired by the interactive nature of pressing flowers inside a book. Each book comes with a blank stamped surface with three adhesives inside, so that readers can make their own covers.

Buy it here for $30

'Strange Plants' Looks At Artists and Their Lives With Plants

'Strange Plants' Looks At Artists and Their Lives With Plants

'Strange Plants' Looks At Artists and Their Lives With Plants

Bobby Solomon

July 9, 2014 / By

Burberry Prorsum’s Script Typeface Energizes Their Men’s SS15 Collection

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

When you think of high-end fashion does typeography spring to mind? Patterns and monograms are de rigueur in fashion branding yet type is rarely used to augment a brands presence and reenforce it’s identity. Brian Alexander at SLAMXHYPE recently did a nice job of distilling down the typographic use of fashion brands but how often do you see these typefaces gracing a garment? This is where Burberry has taken a new tack, introducing a beautiful new script which graces their Spring/Summer 2015 menswear collection.

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

Emblazoned with script in all forms they’ve made jackets and bags, scarves and portfolios. The Daily Mail states “the collection, entitled ‘Book Covers & Bruce Chatwin’ featured original illustrations and typographic prints that take their creative lead from vintage English book covers,” while the Telegraph specifically states that it was a “weathered Bruce Chatwin first edition” which provided the inspiration. Christopher Bailey, Burberry’s Chief Creative and CEO, is well known as a book lover, so the stories certainly fit.

For me the collection feels like a bold experiment which uses this lovely script as a visual element, but also as a brand element. The exaggerated scale of the type abstracts it just enough. It piques your interest just slightly but doesn’t detract from the garments and accessories. I’m curious to see if other brands pick up on this trend in their next collections or if this is simply a summer fling with typography. Even so, I applaud Mr. Bailey for bringing a bit of the graphic design world into his fashion design world.

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

Bobby Solomon

July 8, 2014 / By

A.P.C.’s New Los Angeles Flagship Shines A Light On Retail Design

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

Over the weekend I stopped into thew new A.P.C. flagship shop, a space that’s nestled between buzzing Melrose Ave. and the sleepy Melrose Place. The area is dotted with high-end boutiques — such as the lavish Alexander McQueen to the iconically pink Paul Smith – but when you walk into the new A.P.C. it feels like you’ve escaped to a warm, summer retreat. What used to be an old antique shop has been transformed into something comfortable, spacious, and well-considered, with a thoughtful mix of architecture and vegetation.

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

The central plot features a luxuriously planted garden of Californian natives and is framed by a very large window, spanning 59 ft across 3 sides supported by diagonal wooden columns. In every sense it becomes the true heart of the structure. Ceramic brick, commissioned specifically for this project, is used for the floor and acts as a homage to the Hispanic history of Los Angeles, while providing extra light in its reflective nature. It also remains cool to the touch, important to the boutique where air conditioning is kept at a minimum.

The floor also unifies the space, where 3 presentation spaces are created by playing with the differing volumes inherent to the building. Ceilings range from a 20 ft cathedral-like stature to a more humble cottage-like height. As well as the central courtyard, the dual entrance from Melrose Avenue and Melrose Place creates a flow and sense of accessibility to the boutique.

Walking through the space you’re definitely met with a sense of comfort. I went around noon and the light was marvelous, spilling in from the skylights and tall windows. As mentioned above the floor tiles really do reflect the light beautifully, which in turn makes all of the wooden elements radiate a warmth that I’ve never experienced in a retail environment before. I wanted to sit and relax in the shop like it was my home.

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

A.P.C.'s New Los Angeles Flagship Is A Warm and Inviting Destination

The boutique will house the full A.P.C. men’s and women’s collections as well as the recently expanded denim collection, accessories, and collaborations. The Melrose shop will be the crown jewel to an ever-expanding presence in Los Angeles with new shops opening in downtown and Silver Lake in late 2014. Based on this space I’m excited to see how they continue to evolve their spaces.

Bobby Solomon

July 8, 2014 / By

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Matt W. Moore is well known for his vibrant, geometric paintings, products, and street art. His highly stylized work is always vibrantly colored and full of energy and motion. His newest project though, titled Mosaic Mandala Series: Native Utah Elements, funnels that same creativity into a a series of mandelas made from naturally found materials.

This series of mosaic mandalas was created entirely with elements foraged on the mountain and in the valley : River pebbles and stones, shale, red rocks from the high elevations, dead branches from aspen trees, bark from evergreens, cattails from the lake’s edge, dried wild grasses from yesteryear, and cut dead branches exposing the rings of the tree’s life. Everything was right there for me, all I had to do was notice it’s potential. Over the years I have always been drawn to the infinite possibilities of geometric mandala grids. I have painted dozens of them on Canvases and Walls, designed them with colorful Vectors, and even collaborated with a friend on a Robot Rendered Series on paper. A new approach to a timeless concept.

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

I love that Matt was able to find this beautiful symmetry in everything he looks at. It’s kind of funny to me because in all honesty this quite a hippy dippy project, and it shouldn’t be this cool. If you told me someone made some cool “rock art” I’d probably roll my eyes. Matt’s talent to synthesize these materials into something fresh and contemporary is his true talent and I’d absolutely hang one of these on my wall.

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Bobby Solomon

July 7, 2014 / By

What Could The iPhone 6 Look Like?

What Could The iPhone 6 Look Like?

Nicolàs Aichino and Tomas Moyano have created a pretty solid concept of what the new iPhone 6 might be designed to look like based on what’s been reported and leaked. I don’t usually see the value in posting what-if work like this but what they’ve done feels like it’s grounded in reality and isn’t aiming to be sensational.

I personally like the idea of the return to rounded corners, much like the first generation iPhone. It’ll also be interesting to see just how thin they can make it. With the supposed removal of the headphone port, using the lightning connector as the new headphone port, this would make the phone even thinner than it was before. But like any well made object it still needs to have some sort of heft and weight to it. Too light and it will end up feeling like a cheap piece of plastic.

Bobby Solomon

July 7, 2014 / By

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

When it comes to sharply designed branding and identity one of the first names that comes to mind is Brent Couchman and his San Francisco design studio Moniker. One of my recent favorite projects they completed was the branding and identity for Teddy’s Nacho Royale, a Mexican restaurant on the Menlo Park campus of Facebook.

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

I think what they’ve done is a perfect mix of playful type and symbols, all presented in a clean, contemporary fashion. They specifically “developed the visual identity, signage and interior graphics with a nod to local burrito joints, while incorporating their internal culture throughout the restaurant.” Overall it’s really well done, and a place personally I would love to frequent.

You can see more of Moniker’s work by clicking here.

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Bobby Solomon

July 2, 2014 / By

Withings Activité: The First Smart Looking Smart Watch

Withings Activité Is A Smart Looking Watch Smartwatch

For the time being, “smart watches” aren’t a smart bet. So far most companies are producing mobile phones that fit on your wrist, not truly thinking of what the utility of a wrist mounted computing device should be used for. Google’s Android Wear watches seem to be the first coherent thought in this brave new world, but unfortunately it’s focused on being a cool gadget for the tech-savvy first while putting the everyday people market second.

Withings Activité Watch

That’s where Withings and their new Activité watch come in. At first glance what do you see? A watch. A beautiful watch designed in Paris and made in Switzerland out of stainless steel and unbreakable sapphire glass. This is first and foremost a beautifully designed object that will appeal to folks who still wear watches. Looks are deceiving though as it features a variety of helpful, tech focused features like monitoring distance (walking, running, or swimming), calories burned, and quantity and quality of sleep, all of which will sync with Withing’s existing Health Mate app.

This to me feels like the natural progression of smart watches. Be sure that they appeal to a market of people that still wear watches, a number which I’m sure is dwindling, and give them more functionality with less fuss. The less fuss? The battery in the watch will last a year, not the nightly charging that Google’s watches require. I suppose time will tell how these devices evolve.

Withings Activité Is A Smart Looking Watch Smartwatch

Bobby Solomon

July 2, 2014 / By

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