James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Tennis Data Into Music

Finding the intersections between music, technology, and design are often challenging but when it’s done well it can certainly open up new worlds. A perfect example of this is the partnership between James Murphy, of LCD Soundsystem fame, and technologies company IBM who together creating “music” from tennis data supplied by the US Open. The video below does a good job of explaining how they code works and how they created an interface that was familiar to Murphy.

The outcome is quite unique, especially something on this scale. You can visit IBM’s Soundcloud page to get a taste of all the music that’s been created so far based on the data and it’s pretty staggering. It’s like an endless mix of chiptune tracks endlessly looping into one another. This Round of 16 collection is a perfect example as it runs almost 7 hours in total length, non-stop, back-to-back.

Adding to the experience is the fantastic artworks created for round by New York based artist and illustrator Karan Singh. I had been thinking about featuring Singh on the site recently though this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do so. His work is this mish-mash of hyper-saturated, flat colors which create the illusion of 3D shapes. I imagine this had to be a pretty fun yet exhausting project to work on. I’ve selected some of my favorite images below to give you a sense of the variety he’s created.

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Tennis Data Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

You can also see more of Karan’s pieces over on his Behance page.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

Joseph Perry’s ‘Every Cloud’ Print Artfully Displays The Varying Types of Clouds

'Every Cloud' Print by Joseph Perry

'Every Cloud' Print by Joseph Perry

The last time we checked in with British designer Joseph Perry he was artfully reorganizing the periodic table, artfully recreating it into something less functional but certainly more aesthetically pleasing. Now he’s back with a new silkscreened print which can turn even you into a novice meteorologist.

Every Cloud celebrates the scientific work of Luke Howard, the amateur meteorologist who brought order to the ever-changing skies. In his book ‘The Modifications of Clouds’ (1803) Howard harnessed the unpredictable beauty of the clouds, classifying them using a Latin naming structure.

I love that he chose to screen the white on to the electrically colored indigo paper which provides such a lovely contrast. These are limited to 100 so be sure to snag one while they last.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

Marc Newson Joins The Apple Design Team

Marc Newson Joins The Apple Design Team

It’s going to be a big week for Apple. They’re announcing new products on Tuesday in a live event, likely to be a new NFC-able iPhone and some sort of wearable, and last week they made one huge announcement: famed Australian industrial designer Marc Newson will be joining the Apple design team. Vanity Fair broke the news late Friday afternoon, which included a short note about the new union from Jony Ive.

“Marc is without question one of the most influential designers of this generation,” Ive said in a statement provided to VF Daily. “He is extraordinarily talented. We are particularly excited to formalize our collaboration as we enjoy working together so much and have found our partnership so effective.”

Marc Newson - Nike-Zvezdochka

Marc Newson - KAWS and Ikepod Watches

In my eyes this is a huge win for Apple. I believe that Newson is one of the best living industrial designers and having his mind join that of the Apple design team is incredible. I have two of his products which I still cherish and use to this day – the Zvezdochka shoes he created for Nike and the Pentax K01, one of the coolest cameras I’ve ever used.

It’s also interesting to think of Newson in regards to the rumors of an Apple wearable. As you can see above Newson does have a history of designing time pieces so it’s not hard to imagine that Newson may be contributing to this effort in some way. In a video with designboom which you can watch below he speaks about designing (and hand building!) watches way back in 1986.

My friend Ed was speculating that the Jony Ive and Marc Newson (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s could have been a ruse to cover up their collaboration on said wearable.

Marc Newson - Pentax K01 Camera

Marc Newson - Biomega Bicycle

Marc Newson - Ford Concept Car

I’ve included a few more of the fantastic pieces he’s made over the years as well, a bike for Biomega and the Ford 021C concept car, to give a sense of the range of products Newson has created over the years. Hell, he’s even designed a space plane. It’ll be fantastic to see how Apple’s industrial design changes with his presence at the company.

Bobby Solomon

September 8, 2014 / By

‘NIGO® Only Lives Twice’ – The Most Ridiculous Yet Enviable Auction You’ll Ever See

NIGO® Only Lives Twice

“I wanted to have an estate sale of my own but obviously I couldn’t get any enjoyment from it myself if I was dead. So I decided to do it now.”

That’s the quite peculiar thinking of acclaimed designer Nigo, the founder of Japanese clothing branding A Bathing Ape, on his upcoming Sotheby’s auction titled NIGO® Only Lives Twice, which takes place October 7th, 2014 in Hong Kong.

NIGO® Only Lives Twice

The auction is filled with an eclectic mix of art and design unlike anything I’ve ever seen before. Amongst the objects up for auction are a number of paintings and sculptures from KAWS, paintings by Andy Warhol, lots of Eames pieces, many vintage signs and memorabilia, and of course, a Gucci christmas tree designed by Tom Ford. Clearly he’s a man of great taste though to me it shows how insanely lavish the super-rich can live. What do you want to bet that this is but a small part of a much larger collection?

You can see the entire ridiculous list of lots by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

September 8, 2014 / By

No. The Powerful Word That Creatives Love.

Creative People Say No

Came across a piece over on Medium by Kevin Ashton which I thought made a pretty great point: Creatives know the power of no.

Creators do not ask how much time something takes but how much creation it costs. This interview, this letter, this trip to the movies, this dinner with friends, this party, this last day of summer. How much less will I create unless I say “no?” A sketch? A stanza? A paragraph? An experiment? Twenty lines of code? The answer is always the same: “yes” makes less. We do not have enough time as it is. There are groceries to buy, gas tanks to fill, families to love and day jobs to do.

Learning to say no to the right and wrong things takes time, as does learning the true value of your time, but once you do life gets remarkably better. Personally I’d add my favorite word to the bucket: Why? As a creative director I spend most of my day asking people pointed, specific questions. Why that color? Is that the best way to lay this out? What’s the value of doing something at all? Those two words combined have served me well, allowing my team to focus on better projects and make higher quality work. Hopefully it these words do the same for you.

Bobby Solomon

September 8, 2014 / By

Neasden Control Centre Brings Typography to the Table with Branding for Artisan Restaurant

Neasden Control Centre - Illustration and Branding for Artisan, Manchester

Neasden Control Centre - Illustration and Branding for Artisan, Manchester

UK-based illustrated Stephen Smith has been working under the name of Neasden Control Centre for almost 15 years. One of his most recent projects has been illustrating the menus for Artisan; a hip restaurant and bar in the Northern-city of Manchester. NCC’s approach here has been to serve up a delicious selection of hand-drawn type; presenting a great choice of ‘A’s’ that no doubt echo the variety of choices found within the menu.

Neasden Control Centre - Illustration and Branding for Artisan, Manchester

This is not the first time that NCC has worked with Artisan. When it opened last year he worked on the overall identity for the space. Bringing site specific artwork, illustrations, installations and murals to every corner of the Spinningfields located space. The restaurant covers a vast 12,000 square foot area, so it must have been a massive undertaking for the one-man studio. You can see more shots from the interior on his website.

Neasden Control Centre - Illustration and Branding for Artisan, Manchester

I also think that his work for the set-menus is just as strong and, while I was going to put this down to his excellent choice of a bold black-and-white palette, it’s clear to see that the lunch and kids menus work just as well in color. His choice of bright primary colors add just the right amount of cheerfulness for day-time dinning. I think they look great.

Neasden Control Centre - Illustration and Branding for Artisan, Manchester

More work from Neasden Control Centre can be viewed on Stephen’s website.

Philip Kennedy

September 4, 2014 / By

Cereal Magazine Explores New York’s Under-Appreciated Noguchi Museum

The Noguchi Museum – An Under-Appreciated New York Treasure

I’m pretty novice when it comes to museums and galleries in New York. I’ve been to the big ones like MoMA and The Armory, but it wasn’t until recently that I read there was a museum in Queens dedicated to the work of Isamu Noguchi. The Noguchi Museum opened in 1985, the museum is truly unique because Noguchi himself designed and curated the space, the only one artist created space like this in the U.S.

Writer Daniel Waite Penn recently visited the museum for Cereal Magazine, penning a lovely piece that explains the mystique of the Noguchi’s works and the space they permanently inhabit.

Polished sections and geometric slices are cut into the remaining swathes of their rough, unaltered surfaces, dubbed by Noguchi the ‘skin’ of the stone. Crowbar chips and dynamite holes are evidence of the quarrying process, embracing found qualities alongside a determination to shape the raw material into art. This juxtaposition of deliberate geometry with natural and accidental irregularity gives these works a powerful formal tension, showing Noguchi at the height of his creative powers. He was a veteran artist by the time he made them, and they evince his lack of interest in notions of perfection – a theme he had pursued diligently in earlier phases of his career.

The next time I’m in New York I’m definitely making a special trip out there to visit.

The Noguchi Museum – An Under-Appreciated New York Treasure

Bobby Solomon

September 3, 2014 / By

Stian Korntved Ruud Creates A Unique Hand Carved Spoon Every Day for One Year

Stian Korntved Ruud - Daily Spoon

The spoon. It’s a ubiquitous tool that perhaps most of take for granted. I looked up the definition of a spoon (because when was the last you did that?) which states it is “an implement consisting of a small, shallow oval or round bowl on a long handle, used for eating, stirring, and serving food.” And if there’s anyone who’s testing this definition it’s probably Stian Korntved Ruud, an Oslo School of Architecture grad and former intern at Tom Dixon. He has a wonderful ongoing project simply titled Daily Spoon, where obviously he creates a unique looking spoon every day for one year straight.

Stian Korntved Ruud - Daily Spoon

By repeating the production of a spoon every day for a longer period of time (365 days), the goal is to challenge and explore a spoons aesthetic and functional qualities. I make all the spoons in a traditional way with only hand tools. The point of this is to actively cooperate with the material, in this case wood. In a modern industrial production the machines overwrites the wooden structures and natural growth pattern. When using manual hand tools my hand collaborates with the wood structure during the forming process. This underpins all the spoons unique qualities.

Stian has made big spoons and small spoons, wide spoons and knobby spoons. There are spoons with spikes and spoons with holes. His creations, although all quite beautiful and considered, begin to feel Seuss-ian in their variety. It’s incredibly impressive that he’s been able to create such a diverse number of shapes where I think a lot of people would have given up after doing 50 or so.

If you’re interested in following Stian’s progress you should visit his Instagram where he posts spoons daily, or on his website.

Stian Korntved Ruud - Daily Spoon

Stian Korntved Ruud - Daily Spoon

Stian Korntved Ruud - Daily Spoon

Bobby Solomon

September 3, 2014 / By

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