Lotta Nieminen Brings A Bold Look To A New York Nail Salon

Paintbox branding by Lotta Nieminen

When you think of well-thought out graphic design projects your mind most likely won’t drift toward the world of nail salons. Most commonly their known for shabby neon signs and rows of cheap chairs lined up with thousands of tiny bottles of paints surrounding them. That’s not the case with Paintbox, a new manicure and nail art studio that received a beautiful bit of branding from one of my favorite designer/illustrators, Lotta Nieminen.

Paintbox branding by Lotta Nieminen

Paintbox branding by Lotta Nieminen

For me the idea behind this branding screams “No duh!” in it’s simplicity and that’s exactly why I love it. There’s a perfect elegance to literally turning the words into a box form and that it reads so well. Yet the form takes on a playful nature when the words are separated, allowing other visual devices like imagery or text to inhabit the negative space between.

I’m also a fan of the peachy tone that’s used throughout most of the materials. It’s a warm and inviting tone that allows the color of the nails to truly shine.

Paintbox branding by Lotta Nieminen

Paintbox branding by Lotta Nieminen

Paintbox branding by Lotta Nieminen

Even the nail art imagery itself, which was shot by Jamie Nelson, has a refined look that, while quite stylized, evoke the brand for being way more modern than the shop your mother may have visited. You can see more imagery from the project by visiting Lotta’s website.

Bobby Solomon

September 22, 2014 / By

Surreal Purple Dunes Created for Prada Women’s SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

When it comes to the fashion world and runway shows creating spectacular experiences to wow an audience no expense is spared. The clothes these days have to share the stage with the stage as the importance of Instagram and the sharing economy continues to grow. Recently, Prada wowed audience members with surreal, immense hills made of purple sand that towered over the parading models for their Women’s SS15 collection.

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

NY Times blog On The Runway had a great perspective of the show which illustrated how impactful the installation was.

The normally exhausted expressions that are plastered on editors’ faces during this time were replaced with actual, honest-to-God smiles (maybe the booze helped). The fashion editor Giovanna Battaglia has been working with some Milan-based designers for their shows this season (she said she would be at fittings all night Thursday night for one show on Friday), but she wouldn’t miss this.

“I’ve been consulting, but I stepped out and said, ‘This is the one, I don’t care, sorry, I have to stop working,’?” she said. “I have to go out and see Prada.”

The grandeur of this effort is brilliant to me. As I’ve been looking at these images I was imagining how difficult it would be to get all that sand to stay in place. A small detail but had to be so important when you have women in super high clogs and heels working their stuff. There’s also a simple beauty to the idea which I think helps it. It’s not over the top like Chanel’s grocery store runway show (which was impressive in it’s own right) but still has quite the wow factor.

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Bobby Solomon

September 22, 2014 / By

Fou de Feu Celebrate Rhythm and Balance With This New Tableware Range

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

Fou de Feu is a ceramic studio by Belgian designer Veerle Van Overloop. Her latest collection is called Rhythm and it’s clear to see why. Simple stripped-down ceramics is the order of the day as she mixes white porcelain with other materials such as wood, leather and marble. In doing this she has created an inspiring tableware range where the simplicity of her work and her combination of materials come together to form an effortlessly beautiful collection.

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

“Different sizes of plates, cups & spoons, tablemats and cutting boards give every table its own rhythm” says van Overloop. If she’s right, then her newest collection will no doubt offer everyone the opportunity to build their own harmonic arrangements at the dining-room table.

Rhythm by Fou de Feu

Found via the excellent This is Paper. You can see more from Fou de Feu here.

Philip Kennedy

September 18, 2014 / By

The First New Track from Aphex Twin in 13 Years and a Look At The Album Design

Aphex Twin - Syro

Electronic music visionary Aphex Twin, aka Richard D. James, is known for his avant garde approach to music, splicing, cutting, and destroying digital sounds for the last 20+ years. Still, it’s been 13 years since his last “studio album” Drukqs was released, leaving a peculiar gap in the electronic music landscape. Since then he’s been DJing across the UK and relocated to Scotland. And now he’s ready to release a new album.

Titled Syro, a word created by his children, the album features 12 tracks and will be released on September 19 (or 22nd depending on your format of choice). I’m not sure what exactly to expect from the album but it sounds like he’s excited for the album and that this is only the beginning. Speaking to Rolling Stones, James said:

Horny. I’m feeling really horny about it. And very smug … I’m in that mode now, so hopefully I’ll stay in it for a while … I’ve got a few more things planned—at least a couple more albums, some EPs, things like that. Some more dance-y things I did about 10 years ago. Experimental things, noise things, weird things. Shitloads of stuff. They’re all pretty much ready to go.

Looking forward to it.

Aphex Twin - Syro

From a design perspective the album features a minimal, slightly cheeky packaging design from The Designers Republic. Long-time Aphex Twin collaborators, the album represents an unseen aspect of producing an album: the cost. TDR founder Ian Anderson explains.

“The intense, and ultimately pointless detail of the list really appealed to me … it was good working with James Burton and the team at Warp to stretch out this mantra that tells the reader everything and nothing about the creation of what I hear was an intensely personal album in the making reduced to the numbers of an album in the marketplace,” he adds.

Quite a conceptual way to go but it makes sense when you think of an artist like Richard James. For me it’s all about the half face screen printed onto the plastic which I’m sure looks crazy on the white sleeves. You can read more about the design of the album and an interview with TDR over on Creative Review.

Aphex Twin - Syro

Aphex Twin - Syro

Aphex Twin - Syro

Bobby Solomon

September 17, 2014 / By

You’ve Never Seen a Clock Quite Like ‘A Million Times Project’ by Humans since 1982

A million Times Project, 2013

Per Emanuelsson and Bastian Bischoff founded their studio in 2009/2010 while they were both taking a Masters course at Gothenburg’s School of Design and Crafts. Realizing that they were both born in 1982, they chose Humans since 1982 as their name, then they found a studio to work from in Stockholm and they’ve been making work together ever since.

Perhaps their most exciting project to-date has been the ‘A Million Times Project’. Started last year, this project presents time in a way I’m sure you’ve never seen before. Graphically conceptual, their design combines engineering and mechanics to create an incredible kinetic installation that takes the arms of a traditional analogue clock and turns them into something new and exciting. Check out the video below to see what I mean.

Using 288 analogue clocks, the original work uses an iPad to create a series of wonderful visual patterns; playfully turning a collection of minimalist analogue clockfaces into a fully-functioning digital clock. Now a series, the duo have worked on a number of variations, with each piece being unique. They describe these creations as “objects unleashed from a solely pragmatic existence”. And in doing this I feel that they have discovered some wonderfully figurative qualities within their design without detracting from the clocks original function. It’s a pretty commendable achievement… and also it clearly looks amazing!

A million Times Project, 2013

A million Times Project, 2013

A million Times Project, 2013

See more projects from Humans since 1982 on their website.

Philip Kennedy

September 17, 2014 / By

Weather Dial Perfects The Concept of the Minimal Weather App

Weather Dial App

In the last few years we’ve hit a maximum saturation point when it comes to weather apps. They’re easy to make with weather data readily available and a rather straightforward functionality. That said I was surprised by the newly updated version of Weather Dial which features a slimmed down UI and straightforward experience.

weather-dial-2

The app focuses (as it should) primarily on the weather with a subtle reference to the days to come. Swipe left and you can see information on the times of the sunrise and sunset as well as the humidity and wind speed. A light and dark mode rounds things out nicely. The one surprise is when you turn the phone sideways you access an hourly view of the weather which iconically shows you the type of moon and the chance of precipitation chart which animates in nicely, as you can see below.

Weather Dial 2 Perfects The Concept of the Minimal Weather App

My current weather app is Yahoo! Weather, though as I’ve been using Weather Dial I appreciate the straightforwardness of it. The app reminds me of the phrase, “a place for everything and everything in its place.” The font choice allows for a clear legibility, the iconography is considered and overall you see that it’s just the right amount of information to make it perfectly useful.

You can download it for yourself by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

September 16, 2014 / By

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Tennis Data Into Music

Finding the intersections between music, technology, and design are often challenging but when it’s done well it can certainly open up new worlds. A perfect example of this is the partnership between James Murphy, of LCD Soundsystem fame, and technologies company IBM who together creating “music” from tennis data supplied by the US Open. The video below does a good job of explaining how they code works and how they created an interface that was familiar to Murphy.

The outcome is quite unique, especially something on this scale. You can visit IBM’s Soundcloud page to get a taste of all the music that’s been created so far based on the data and it’s pretty staggering. It’s like an endless mix of chiptune tracks endlessly looping into one another. This Round of 16 collection is a perfect example as it runs almost 7 hours in total length, non-stop, back-to-back.

Adding to the experience is the fantastic artworks created for round by New York based artist and illustrator Karan Singh. I had been thinking about featuring Singh on the site recently though this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do so. His work is this mish-mash of hyper-saturated, flat colors which create the illusion of 3D shapes. I imagine this had to be a pretty fun yet exhausting project to work on. I’ve selected some of my favorite images below to give you a sense of the variety he’s created.

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Tennis Data Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

You can also see more of Karan’s pieces over on his Behance page.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

Joseph Perry’s ‘Every Cloud’ Print Artfully Displays The Varying Types of Clouds

'Every Cloud' Print by Joseph Perry

'Every Cloud' Print by Joseph Perry

The last time we checked in with British designer Joseph Perry he was artfully reorganizing the periodic table, artfully recreating it into something less functional but certainly more aesthetically pleasing. Now he’s back with a new silkscreened print which can turn even you into a novice meteorologist.

Every Cloud celebrates the scientific work of Luke Howard, the amateur meteorologist who brought order to the ever-changing skies. In his book ‘The Modifications of Clouds’ (1803) Howard harnessed the unpredictable beauty of the clouds, classifying them using a Latin naming structure.

I love that he chose to screen the white on to the electrically colored indigo paper which provides such a lovely contrast. These are limited to 100 so be sure to snag one while they last.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

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