Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Matt W. Moore is well known for his vibrant, geometric paintings, products, and street art. His highly stylized work is always vibrantly colored and full of energy and motion. His newest project though, titled Mosaic Mandala Series: Native Utah Elements, funnels that same creativity into a a series of mandelas made from naturally found materials.

This series of mosaic mandalas was created entirely with elements foraged on the mountain and in the valley : River pebbles and stones, shale, red rocks from the high elevations, dead branches from aspen trees, bark from evergreens, cattails from the lake’s edge, dried wild grasses from yesteryear, and cut dead branches exposing the rings of the tree’s life. Everything was right there for me, all I had to do was notice it’s potential. Over the years I have always been drawn to the infinite possibilities of geometric mandala grids. I have painted dozens of them on Canvases and Walls, designed them with colorful Vectors, and even collaborated with a friend on a Robot Rendered Series on paper. A new approach to a timeless concept.

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

I love that Matt was able to find this beautiful symmetry in everything he looks at. It’s kind of funny to me because in all honesty this quite a hippy dippy project, and it shouldn’t be this cool. If you told me someone made some cool “rock art” I’d probably roll my eyes. Matt’s talent to synthesize these materials into something fresh and contemporary is his true talent and I’d absolutely hang one of these on my wall.

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Mosaic Mandalas Made From Found Objects by Matt W. Moore

Bobby Solomon

July 7, 2014 / By

What Could The iPhone 6 Look Like?

What Could The iPhone 6 Look Like?

Nicolàs Aichino and Tomas Moyano have created a pretty solid concept of what the new iPhone 6 might be designed to look like based on what’s been reported and leaked. I don’t usually see the value in posting what-if work like this but what they’ve done feels like it’s grounded in reality and isn’t aiming to be sensational.

I personally like the idea of the return to rounded corners, much like the first generation iPhone. It’ll also be interesting to see just how thin they can make it. With the supposed removal of the headphone port, using the lightning connector as the new headphone port, this would make the phone even thinner than it was before. But like any well made object it still needs to have some sort of heft and weight to it. Too light and it will end up feeling like a cheap piece of plastic.

Bobby Solomon

July 7, 2014 / By

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

When it comes to sharply designed branding and identity one of the first names that comes to mind is Brent Couchman and his San Francisco design studio Moniker. One of my recent favorite projects they completed was the branding and identity for Teddy’s Nacho Royale, a Mexican restaurant on the Menlo Park campus of Facebook.

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

I think what they’ve done is a perfect mix of playful type and symbols, all presented in a clean, contemporary fashion. They specifically “developed the visual identity, signage and interior graphics with a nod to local burrito joints, while incorporating their internal culture throughout the restaurant.” Overall it’s really well done, and a place personally I would love to frequent.

You can see more of Moniker’s work by clicking here.

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Bobby Solomon

July 2, 2014 / By

Withings Activité: The First Smart Looking Smart Watch

Withings Activité Is A Smart Looking Watch Smartwatch

For the time being, “smart watches” aren’t a smart bet. So far most companies are producing mobile phones that fit on your wrist, not truly thinking of what the utility of a wrist mounted computing device should be used for. Google’s Android Wear watches seem to be the first coherent thought in this brave new world, but unfortunately it’s focused on being a cool gadget for the tech-savvy first while putting the everyday people market second.

Withings Activité Watch

That’s where Withings and their new Activité watch come in. At first glance what do you see? A watch. A beautiful watch designed in Paris and made in Switzerland out of stainless steel and unbreakable sapphire glass. This is first and foremost a beautifully designed object that will appeal to folks who still wear watches. Looks are deceiving though as it features a variety of helpful, tech focused features like monitoring distance (walking, running, or swimming), calories burned, and quantity and quality of sleep, all of which will sync with Withing’s existing Health Mate app.

This to me feels like the natural progression of smart watches. Be sure that they appeal to a market of people that still wear watches, a number which I’m sure is dwindling, and give them more functionality with less fuss. The less fuss? The battery in the watch will last a year, not the nightly charging that Google’s watches require. I suppose time will tell how these devices evolve.

Withings Activité Is A Smart Looking Watch Smartwatch

Bobby Solomon

July 2, 2014 / By

Kelsey Brookes Painting Timelapse

I don’t know about you but one of my morning rituals is checking Instagram, getting a glimpse of what my friends and inspirations are up to. Earlier this morning there was great time-lapse of a painting done by Kelsey Brookes, who sums it up best by saying, “Months of work turned into a ten second video.” Still, it’s wonderful to see the process of something so huge and beautiful.

If you’re unfamiliar with his work or are a huge fan like I am you should definitely follow him on Instagram. I’ve also put a few of his images below which give a sense of the trippy paintings he creates which are based on the molecular make up of drugs.

Kelsey Brookes Paintings

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Bobby Solomon

July 1, 2014 / By

Miniio – Making Dolls’ Houses With A Difference

Miniio - A Dolls House With A Difference

I didn’t think I’d be posting about dolls’ house this week on The Fox Is Black but I really couldn’t pass up an opportunity to share these delightful creations by Polish company Miniio. Inspired by the Bauhaus and Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan; Miniio’s creations feel like a breath of fresh air in a world of flashy, plastic toys and garish pink dolls’ houses.

Miniio - A Dolls House With A Difference

Miniio - A Dolls House With A Difference

These designs brush aside the cliched gender stereotypes so often seen in the world of toys and instead focus on producing beautifully crafted models and smartly thought out designs.

Miniio - A Dolls House With A Difference

The project is the brainchild of two mums from Warsaw who like to take play seriously. They seek inspiration in the best grown-up designs, materials and solutions and then they make it smaller. Everything they do is finished by hand and the results are terrific. If you’re a hip parent I can imagine this is something you’d love to have in your kids playroom!

More information on Miniio and their modernist designer furniture and dolls’ houses can be found on their website.

Philip Kennedy

June 30, 2014 / By

Five Fonts for Summer

Five Fonts for Summer

The arrival of any season brings a number of design trends from colors and shapes and type. Summer is hear so it’s time for warmer colors and to drop your serifs. I’ve selected five examples of display type and trends I’d like to see gracing designs this time of year.

 

ThirstySoft_Summerfont

1. Thirsty Soft - This is my top pick for summer and one of the best scripts I’ve seen in a long time. Thirsty Soft by Yellow Design Studios (add these guys to your watch list) is a vintage-inspired font family with  kick-ass ligatures and works as both retro and contemporary display type.  It comes with six different weights, shadow layers and a handful of other features in addition to a particularly beautiful ampersand. It’d make for great summer advertising and signage and I could picture it advertising some frozen treat or lemonade out on a boardwalk.

 

Roccia_SummerFont

2. Roccia – An experimental sans by Mark Oggian available on Ten Dollar Fonts. I’m not a huge fan of the alternative geometric sans trend because I think it can get to be too much, too quickly and fear people will abuse it but I don’t mind it sparingly. I think Roccia hits the right notes with it’s decorative glyphs. I find it gives off a bit of a summer music festival vibe and could easily see it on gig posters as well as striking display type in magazines.

Supernett_SummerFont

3. Supernett – A fun, handwritten sans by Georg Herold Wildfellner. It’s playful without being obnoxious. It looks great in all weights, especially light. It works for anything outdoorsy or green. It can have an organic feel if it’s played the right way.  ATCTimberline_SummerFont

4. ATC Timberline – A fresh release from Avondale Type Company, which I featured on my foundries to watch post a little while back. These guys are churning out typefaces with ease and their new, ultra-wide sans makes for nice type for more serious, summer designs. It’d also work as a nice secondary typeface.

 

Knewave_SummerFont

5. Knewave - This brush type from Tyler Fincke has been around for a few years on League of Moveable Type but this is exactly what I picture when I think of type and summer. I simply could not leave it off this list. It screams beach and surf magazine spread. It’s bold and a bit haphazard while still maintaining a lot of uniformity.

Carli Krueger

June 30, 2014 / By

Google’s Street Art Project is a Step in the Right Direction for Graffiti

Google-streetart-1

Google’s Paris-based Cultural Institute has recently launched a database called the Street Art Project. This initiative features street art from across the globe, much of which no longer exists. Working alongside various cultural organizations worldwide, and putting to use their very own Street View, the Cultural Institute and subsequent Street Art Project is making these public works increasingly more public, democratizing art, and chronicling it’s contemporary impact for the future. It’s one of those projects that makes Google hard not to love.

 

The Google Cultural Institute, founded in 2011, is composed of a staff around 30 engineers. It’s a project that’s documenting the physical and bringing it to the web for the public to access. They want users to be able to view the Art Projects, Historical Moments, and World Wonders that have shaped our world, from the comfort of your home. As of now, they’ve already helped create online archives for historic figures, such as Nelson Mandela, or used Street View to provide renderings of World Heritage sites. But what really grabs my attention is the focus they’re placing on graffiti—handling it with the respect and admiration that is traditionally associated with works found in museums or on gallery walls.

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“I’m not treating street art as anything different from what I would do with the Impressionist collection I’m getting on Art Project,” said Amit Sood, director of the Cultural Institute. The Street Art Project is sister to the Art Project, another Cultural Institute initiative that has provided technical support to more than 460 museums and helped in bringing their collections to the web for all to see.

Google-streetart-6

The Street Art Project is searchable by artists, city, genre and other categories. Not only does it consist of current art viewable in the public, but it also documents much of which that doesn’t exist anymore. Of the 30 institutions that have furnished the platform with images is the Museum of the City of New York; the Dallas Contemporary; Living Walls: The City Speaks in Atlanta; and the Museum of Street Art in France.

Google-streetart-5

On one side, Google is helping bring street art to a more respectable level. On the other, it’s perpetuating what street art already encompasses, that is public art in the public space. The New York Times encapsulates this in stating, “Google is formalizing what street art fans around the world already do: take pictures of city walls and distribute them on social media.” It’s an effort to make art more available to viewers, a public domain gone more public, and it’s fascinating to see it happen thanks to the developments of technology and the culture-bridging, border-crossing abilities of the internet.

 

Shepard Fairey stated that, “I’ve always used my street art to democratize art, so it would be philosophically inconsistent for me to protest art democratization through Google.” Street art often comes with a bad rep, where people have a hard time distinguishing it from vandalism.

Google-streetart-7

Lois Stavsky, who runs Street Art NYC says that most artists like the idea of of enabling more people to view their work. Especially the Street Art Project’s potential to preserve work. Take 5Pointz for example, the famous NYC graffiti landmark that was whitewashed last year. Working alongside the Cultural Institute, Stavsky sorted through hundreds of 5Pointz photos to uploaded several to Google’s new platform—making a location available to thousands that otherwise would’ve never had the opportunity to see.

Google-streetart-2

As is expected from a company like Google, the platform itself is designed to utilize the web’s functions and perform smoothly. It’s intuitive and features a bunch of interesting features, from documentaries to dipping into street view to have a look at building’s interiors. Perhaps the most innovative feature is a special camera they used to document certain pieces (such as VHILS who’s famous for sculpting work into walls), allowing users to zoom in and take a closer look in stunning clarity.

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Nick Partyka

June 26, 2014 / By

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