Eszter Laki Brings A Refined Design Identity to the Terminal Restaurant & Bar in Budapest

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

I love a good re-use project and the Terminal Restaurant & Bar is a prime example. Designed by István Nyir and built in 1949, The Mávaut Station was one of the largest and busiest bus stations in downtown Budapest. The simple, well-proportioned building was built for long-distance transport requirements with a spacious, bright waiting hall. Thankfully it was preserved as a monument in the 80s, and then in 2004 refurbished as the Design Terminal, the first design center of Budapest.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

The interiors design was conceived by the 81font architecture in a tight cooperation with the graphic identity. We were eager to preserve, recall and highlight the original features of the building. This attitude resulted in the emblematic logo, the minimalist copper clock which has served the building from the very beginning. This sign appears on the furnitures as well: the linoleum coatings wear the same clock as a copper marquetry. The iconic Hungarian Ikarus bus is a leading element in the graphic identity as well: the technical drawings of the famous vehicle are part of the menu card. We used a rubber stamp to indicate the subtle changes around the opening period and put a test drive caption (“Próbajárat”) on the paper cards.

The rich history of the space mixed with the subtle design elements is well-considered. The use of the copper clock as a mark was created by Eszter Laki, graphic designer on the project. The warm copper mixed with the whites and navy blues is an attractive, timeless combination. If you find yourself in Budapest be sure to stop by.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Bobby Solomon

July 21, 2014 / By

Fat & Furious Burger Elevates Hamburgers Into Works of Art

Fat & Furious Burger

It’s a matter of fact that my favorite meal is the hamburger. There’s something so perfect about the combination of beef, cheese, and produce all wrapped up in a pair of fresh buns. Thankfully the folks at Fat & Furious Burger feels the same way, turning hamburgers into these fantastic works of food art. I don’t think I’ve ever seen so many different kinds of burgers ever, and you’ve probably seen nothing quite like these. These burgers are themed around all sorts of pop culture topics like soccer, outer space, birthdays, James Bond, all sorts of crazy stuff.

A lot of the time they even include the ingredients to their burgers, like the Burger Blanc sur Fond Blanc below, which includes a chicken breast filet, roasted camembert, honey, white onions marinated in vinegar, endive, and mushrooms. It might be a little intimidating looking but I’d certainly be up for the challenge.

Fat & Furious Burger

Fat & Furious Burger

Bobby Solomon

July 17, 2014 / By

Copenhagen by Vifa: A Bluetooth Speaker With A Warm, Nordic Design

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

The world of bluetooth music accessories continues to expand, with stand-outs like Jambox and Nixon to up-and-comers like Lowdi. Entering from a design minded angle is the Copenhagen speaker from Vifa, pairing high-tech know-how with classic Nordic design.

The speaker was designed by Henrik Mathiassen in cooperation with Vifa to those who “values exclusive design just as much as authentic sound.” Each Copenhagen also features a special-woven textile by Kvadrat that lines the front which makes them feel warmer and more human. The combination of fabric and aluminum definitely sets it apart from other speakers like it.

No word on a release date yet but hopefully we see them out in the wild soon.

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Bobby Solomon

July 16, 2014 / By

The Upon Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

The UPON Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

Mimesis in design is something we do often. We take the parts of nature that work really well and apply it to the things we make, like this teapot by Nikolo Kermiov. Simple in form and material, the Upon Teapot draws it’s inspiration from rain falling on a mountain top.

The Upon Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

The main idea behind Upon-tea pot was to make/transform preparing and serving tea primarily to a visual experience. Inspiration was also sought from the origins of tea – the mountain landscapes where clouds almost seem like made of tea/rain tea. Upon also beautifully refracts light between the three different materials.

Honestly, this looks like the fanciest bong ever but I have to give Nokolo props for something so simple. I appreciate that he’s only using glass, cork, and ceramic, and that all of the pieces work together so poetically. For now this is only a prototype but it sounds like there are plans to try to get it into production. You know this would look really sexy sitting on your kitchen counter.

The UPON Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

The UPON Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

Bobby Solomon

July 15, 2014 / By

Manual Brings A Refined Identity To Mountain Bike Apparel Company Kitsbow

Kitsbow Brand Identity by Manual

When I think if branding for outdoor activity companies I have mixed feelings. Sometimes they feel really granola or too extreme, sometimes they’re well-considered and well-done like Aether Apparel. The folks at Manual, a design studio based in San Francisco, decided to go with the latter route for their branding of Kitsbow, a company that makes high quality mountain bike apparel with a minimal aesthetic and tailored details.

The logo references both the tailoring aspect of the product, and the winding trails on which mountain bikers ride. A monochromatic color palette with small touches of a blue accent color was used across all branded deliverables. We used extra thick card stocks, varnishes and foils to provide a sense of tactility and quality.

Kitsbow Brand Identity by Manual

Kitsbow Brand Identity by Manual

The identity design is extremely far reaching, encompassing apparel, website, stationary, and even a van wrap. The concept of the winding trails as the logo inspiration is fitting and brings a bit of life to a brand which could have been rigid or stodgy. I’m also really impressed with the iconography created for the clothing labels, which give the customer clear insight into what abilities the garment has.

You can see more of the work Manual did by clicking here, and you can visit the Kitsbow site by clicking here.

Kitsbow Brand Identity by Manual

Kitsbow Brand Identity by Manual

Kitsbow Brand Identity by Manual

Kitsbow Brand Identity by Manual

Bobby Solomon

July 14, 2014 / By

Leanne Shapton Illustrates Beautiful Covers For The Jane Austen Vintage Classics Series

Leanne Shapton Illustrates Wonderful Patterns for Jane Austen's Vintage Classsics

Print will never die despite what some people say. The tactility of printed matter is a joy that that will always have a place, and the beauty of seeing a lovely cover in your local book store or in an airport will never fail to captivate the mind. That’s the feeling I get when I look at these covers for The Jane Austen Vintage Classics Series, featuring lovely patterns illustrated by Leanne Shapton.

Leanne Shapton Illustrates Wonderful Patterns for Jane Austen's Vintage Classsics

Shapton’s illustrations give the covers a more contemporary feeling while still feel appropriate to Austen’s work. My personal favorite is the image at top with the black and creme, though the teal with emerald dots are a pretty stunning color combination. CMYK spoke to Leanne about her covers, which to her read as neutral to the stories.

“The nice thing about patterns is that they can evoke a certain mood or tone, but also be neutral. I loved creating a consistent handwritten label style for the six books and then thinking of which patterns might obliquely suit the titles. I think the patterns we chose quietly compliment and correspond to the stories. My favorite is Mansfield Park.”

Leanne Shapton Illustrates Wonderful Patterns for Jane Austen's Vintage Classsics

Currently there are covers for Emma, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, and Persuasion. Hopefully we see Amazon releasing more works like this.

Bobby Solomon

July 14, 2014 / By

Beautiful Minimalist Quilts by Lindsay Stead

Lindsay Stead - Quilts

Quiltmaker Linday Stead creates some pretty wonderful work. Her quilts are rooted in tradition yet they have a really modern sensibility. Based in Toronto, her designs combine color and pattern to excellent affect, creating work that would look just as good hanging on a wall as it would draped on a bed.

Lindsay Stead - Quilts

All made by hand, each quilt is a one-of-a-kind. According to Lindsay it takes between 30 and 80 hours to complete each one, and the results are fantastic. Personally I love the restraint in her designs; her asymmetrical patterns have a bold graphic sensibility and her fondness for minimalism and modernism really shines through.

Lindsay Stead - Quilts

To see Lindsay at work and to learn a little more about her process and inspiration you can check out this short video created by House&Home:

More work from Lindsay can be viewed on her website.

Philip Kennedy

July 14, 2014 / By

Flora Drift Turns Your Browser Into A Synthesizer

Flora Drift

British designer Luke Twyman gave himself a 48 hour challenge: to create a simple web-based generative project. By the end of it he realized that he’d made something pretty rad and decided to put more work into it. What came out of that effort was a project called Flora Drift, which uses procedural generation to create ambient music on the fly and to generate a new jungle/garden scene every 2 bars of music. Essentially the code sets a bunch of rules, then uses randomization to make decisions on how the music & visuals get created. Your browser becomes the synthesizer.

Bobby Solomon

July 10, 2014 / By

Google+