Film review: ‘Gravity’

Film review: 'Gravity'

“Because we are human, because we are bound by gravity and the limitations of our bodies, because we live in a world where the news is often bad and the prospects disturbing, there is a need for another world somewhere, a world where Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers live.”

– Roger Ebert

Alfonso Cuarón’s newest film Gravity is a masterpiece. Roger Ebert’s quote above sums up what’s so special about the film, that it’s truly experiential, a piece of cinema that’s meant to be felt. It seems as though the lack of gravity freed Cuarón’s camera from convention. Long, sprawling scenes are paired with impossible shots to create something unlike anything ever before. The film is seen not only from the vantage of a safe, third party viewer, but also from a first person point of view where you feel the tension and the terror of the characters.

This tension ripples throughout the entire film. At one point you can equate space matter to the sense of dread that rises over you in the beginning of Jaws, as the shark slowly begins to tug at the legs of the unsuspecting skinny dipper. The use of sound, or lack thereof, further heightens this tension as you only hear the breathing of the characters or the gasps of your fellow audience members.

Stanley Kubrick may have said it best:
“If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed.”

Bobby Solomon

October 14, 2013 / By

Invisible Artists – A Preview of ‘Sign Painters’

Sign-Painters-Movie-Po

My theory about signage and typography has been proven true countless times. It predicts that no matter how perfect a new business is set-up, if they use a questionable font for their signage, the business will suffer and eventually close within six months. Okay, maybe it can take up to a year, but inevitably it comes true, I swear. Unfortunately, in most cases signage has become a thoughtless second to other branding materials. But artful, hand-painted, hand-crafted signage was once the shining star.

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Christina Stimpson

June 6, 2013 / By

Polygamy Meets God in L.A. – A Film Review of ‘The Source Family’

TheSourceFamily_Poster

Apparently, the Age of Aquarius has been in full swing since 2012, and as you can see, it has had a great effect on all of us. Well, not me. Not even a little bit actually. But I also don’t belong to a family that forces you to ingest the ‘Jewel of Truth’ and the ‘Wisdom of the Ages’. My family are meat and potatoes kind of people, although I can fully accept that family means something different to everyone. Dysfunctional, urban, organized, nuclear, blended – a family becomes exclusive through the bond (whatever that may be) that is shared among its members. For members of The Source Family, subject of the 2013 documentary, that bond is whatever YaHoWha says it is.

Who is YaHoWha? He is the Earthly Spiritual Father, also known as Father Yod, who was, at one time just plain old James Baker.

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Christina Stimpson

May 30, 2013 / By

Isn’t It Femmantic? – A Film Review of ‘Frances Ha’

Frances Ha poster Noah Baumbach

I have a problem with the word platonic. It defines something that is way more interesting than what it seems to be. Male friendships have now become widely accepted as a ‘Bromances’, yet the bond between females, equally as deep and meaningful, is stuck being defined by the old lifeless descriptor, platonic. A non-sexual love. Snoozer. I’m hoping Greta Gerwig, the lead in Noah Baumbach’s newest film Frances Ha, will be remembered as the femme that helped shed platonic from its drab and stuffy skin. Be it, ‘Femships’ or ‘Bromances’, Frances Ha, actualizes what every woman feels inside for her best friend, love in its lightest form.

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Christina Stimpson

May 23, 2013 / By

On the Fringe of Genre – A Film Review of ‘Upstream Color’

Upstream Color_poster

Thoughtful filmmakers intent on making engaging experimental films in today’s cinematic climate are fearless. Only a handful of filmmakers, able to uncover the balance between formal abstraction and narrative fluff, succeed in making films that are a cut above the rest. Harmony Korine of course rules this utopia, as does David Lynch, Michel Gondry and to a certain extent Terrance Malick, with his rapturous depiction of regeneration. Hopefully, Shane Carruth, the writer, director and star, of his second film Upstream Color, will become the newest, most promising member of this crew.

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Christina Stimpson

May 16, 2013 / By

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