My Favorite “Coffee Shop”: Go Get Em Tiger

My Favorite "Coffee Shop": Go Get Em Tiger

As designers we tend to glamorize coffee. It’s the “fuel” for our projects, it’s the drink that keeps us motivated late at night. Perhaps you could even say we fetishize it. I’d add to the cult of coffee that we all have our favorite places we love to visit. That one shop that knows you, that knows your drink of choice, that with a glance makes you feel at home.

For me that spot is Go Get Em Tiger, a newish coffee shop that only opened last June but is already seen as one of the best in LA. It’s also the sister site of G&B Coffee which is located in the now trendy Grand Central Market which was named one of the Hot 10 places in America by Bon Appetit. Together they’re doing coffee a little differently, and it’s the little things that really matter.

My Favorite "Coffee Shop": Go Get Em Tiger Photo by @alwaysjudging

I would say the immediate difference between GGET and other coffee shops is the general vibe of the place. Rather than wait in line you belly up to a bar, first come first serve, which makes it a much more casual affair. It also helps if you’re a regular, and within seconds someone can swing by and ask if you want your usual. They’re also seating inside and out, dogs are totally welcome, most of the time the doors are always open, and it’s pretty consistently bright inside the space thanks to the big, west facing windows.

My Favorite "Coffee Shop": Go Get Em Tiger Photos by @candacesmkim & @lifeserial

Their ability to pull espresso shots is impeccable, in fact their barista Charles Babinski recently won the 2015 South West Regional Barista Competition, so you can only imagine the level of quality that’s being served. I’m a purist personally and only order the sweet latte. It’s what you’d think it is, a latte, hot or iced, that’s been sweetened with agave, which gives it a much more mild sweetness compared to artificial sweeteners.

My Favorite "Coffee Shop": Go Get Em Tiger Photos by @ccllim_jy & @jarliek

My Favorite "Coffee Shop": Go Get Em Tiger Photo by @monicais

Overall, Go Get Em Tiger gets all the details right. The perfect drinks, the perfect space, the perfect staff who know how to make you feel welcome. The next time you’re in Los Angeles, this is the place to go.

Go Get Em Tiger
230 N Larchmont Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90004

Bobby Solomon

December 16, 2014 / By

The Carry On Cocktail Brings Proper Drinks Back To Flying

Carry On Cocktail

It certainly feels like the glamorous days of flying are over. Free checked bags are history, seats are getting smaller inch by inch, and the food is certainly never going to get better. Thankfully W & P Design and Punch have teamed up to create the Carry On Cocktail, perhaps the cure to inflight mediocrity.

Carry On Cocktail

The kit contains a recipe card, bitters, sugar, a combination spoon & muddler, and to class things up even further, a linen napkin. And because you’re plane bound everything was designed to meet FAA regulations, so there’s no fear of a cranky agent dropping your stash in the trash.

Bobby Solomon

December 2, 2014 / By

The Fox Is Black UK Adventure

The Fox Is Black UK Adventure

Every now and then I have some amazing opportunities offered to me and my upcoming week is no exception. Thanks to the fine folks of Jameson whiskey I’m wandering about Ireland for the next few days spending time meeting local artisans, trying my hands at leather crafting and glass blowing, and of course drinking fine whiskey. I’ll be sharing a few posts about the experience on here though my Instagram will probably be updated the most.

I’ll also be spending a few days in London this weekend so I’m thinking it could be great to do a TFIB Bar Meet-Up somewhere in the city. More information to come!

Bobby Solomon

November 17, 2014 / By

The Coffee Pour Over Becomes Automated Thanks To Poursteady

Poursteady

Poursteady

The pour over coffee has a kind of mythic quality to it. While it’s not the most labor intensive process it’s still time consuming, meaning a lot of people don’t have the patience to make it themselves or wait for a barista to do their magic. Enter the Poursteady, a machine that seemingly does all the work for you.

Poursteady is an automated pour-over coffee machine that brings unprecedented speed, precision, and reliability to high-end commercial coffee retailers–and better coffee to discerning customers. Combining precision motion-control, elegant design, and beautiful fabrication–our system makes up to five cups of pour-over coffee simultaneously with a single barista at the helm.

I imagine purists will balk at such a blasphemous invention but I think the proof is in the pudding, or in this case, the coffee. You can see in the video below how the machine mimics the swirling motion of the pour over, seemingly giving the same care as a human. Certainly interesting seeing robotics entering the coffee industry in such a unique manner.

Bobby Solomon

November 10, 2014 / By

A Hidden Cubby Hole Of Chocolate: Compartés Opens In Melrose Place

Compartes Melrose Place Jonathan Grahm 6

Compartes Melrose Place Jonathan Grahm 5

In the world of cool, young chocolatiers in the United States, only a handful of names will come to mind because those are the only chocolates you see in stores. You have your Brooklyn old schoolers Mast Brothers, cool, mini-makers Woodblock Chocolate, glorified toffee treaters Alma, and the real San Francisco treat TCHO. One of the most important (and somewhat under the radar) makers is Los Angeles’ Compartes, an undoubtedly luxe and incredibly hip brand that eschews artisanal annoyances for no-hype-all-flavor sweets.

Compartes Melrose Place Jonathan Grahm 2

The brand has big news, too: they very recently expanded from a Brentwood storefront, adding a Melrose Place cubby hole hidden from street view (and technically within coffee shop Alfred). It’s an interesting triangular space designed by AAmp Studio that is most befitting of a chocolate store. The goods are a limited selection that include a wall of Love Nuts, a display of chocolate bars, and a glass case of truffles. Yet, that is irrelevant: the shop is an exercise in brevity and beauty, a quick stop into considered foodie charm.

Compartes Melrose Place Jonathan Grahm 3

The design details make the space. The main attraction is a conflicting tiled floor consisting of a black rectangle and triangular brick arrow that leads from the truffle bar to a corner of chocolate bars. A tension (and an eyeline) is created that brings the small room together. A wall of Love Nuts is arranged in a seemingly infinite gradient, placing you in a delectable loop almost demanding your trying each flavor of nut. The counter wisely features a giant logo that doesn’t overpower the room, instead adding a sophistication equivalent of a boutique hotel. If you want to hang for a while, indulging, a small cactus lined seating area is available under a gorgeous white neon sign in brand founder Jonathan Grahm‘s handwriting which reads “Chocolate Is Art.” And, in Compartés case, it really is.

It was a wise move for Compartés to add another location, expanding from their sleepy Brentwood headquarters to a trendy, busy Melrose location. The area may have difficulty in maintaining an identity but the design of the space is so crisp and pristine that it will outlive most of its surroundings. Who doesn’t like chocolate, either? The new Compartés is definitely cause for celebration.

Compartes Melrose Place Jonathan Grahm 4

Compartes Melrose Place Jonathan Grahm 7

Compartes Melrose Place Jonathan Grahm 1

KYLE FITZPATRICK

October 28, 2014 / By

Sophisticated Branding for Fort Point Beer Company by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Crafting unique, standout labels for a new beer seems like an awesome challenge. Making sure that the brew stands out in a competitive market can be difficult as well as creating a look that feels unique and original. Manual, the SF based design firm, has struck gold with this sophisticated look for the Fort Point Beer Company, a craft brewery located in San Francisco’s Presidio.

The brewery resides in a historic Presidio building that was formerly used as an Army motor pool. Their iconic location—close to both the Golden Gate Bridge and the Fort Point National Historic Site—provided inspiration for a modular, illustrative brand identity. The result is a brand that locals can identify with and, as the brand grows and becomes available throughout the nation, can be regarded as the new San Francisco craft beer.

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

I’m a sucker for gold these days (my team will back this up) and the black, white, and tomato red color combinations really make me happy. The geometric patterns have a playful nature which remind me of the work of Mary Blair, and at the same time honors a San Francisco landmark.

Fort Point Beer Company

The choice of a Copperplate Gothic-esque font pairs well with the bold, geometric lines that make up the label. It has a feeling of being both contemporary yet classic, bringing to mind the early days of San Francisco. The overall branding is extremely charming and inviting, and when you see the bottle it certainly looks like something new that you want to try.

You can see more images from the project by clicking here.

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2014 / By

David Chang: “I Hate Fancy Beers”

Miller High Life Print by Alan Hynes

As I write this I’m sipping on a Miller High Life, are is it’s been dubbed, the “Champagne of Beers”. I acquired a taste for it back in 2010/2011 when I was attempting to freelance during a recession. At the corner liquor store near my apartment was 40s of High Life which only cost in the ballpark of $2.50. So long as you kept the 40 oz. cool it was actually a pretty damn good beer. Even Bon Appétit agrees.

Which brings me to my point, this recent article by David Chang for GQ espousing his love for cheap beer. As he says in the article, which I also agree with, rare, obnoxious, snooty beers are great, this is not the reason for his piece. His argument centers around the area that he cares about most: that cheap beers pairs well with food. Here’s the paragraph where he knocks it out of the park.

For all the debatability of my rant here, let me make one ironclad argument for shitty beer: It pairs really well with food. All food. Think about how well champagne pairs with almost anything. Champagne is not a flavor bomb! It’s bubbly and has a little hint of acid and tannin and is cool and crisp and refreshing. Cheap beer is, no joke, the champagne of beers. And cheap beer and spicy food go together like nothing else. Think about Natty Boh and Old Bay-smothered crabs. Or Asian lagers like Orion and Singha and Tiger, which are all perfect ways to wash down your mapo tofu.

Couldn’t agree more. Also, as I tend to find random things when I research posts, I found the really sweet Miller High Life print by Alan Hynes (at top) which you might want to snag. Only $40.

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2014 / By

How LA Design Studio notNeutral Changed The Way We Experience Coffee

How LA Design Studio notNeutral Changed The Way We Experience Coffee

When a delicious meal has been set before you have you ever stopped and wondered if the vessels it is being served in are enhancing the flavors, smells, and presentation ability? Most likely not, but if you’re an obsessive barista working for the most well-respected small coffee chain in America, finding that level of perfection might be an idea you dwell on.

That the story of the Lino cup, a creation between ex-Intelligentsia Director of Innovation Kyle Glanville (who now runs my favorite coffee place Go Get ‘Em Tiger) and LA design studio notNeutral. Together they experimented to figure out a more optimal cup for coffee drinking.

The entire R&D process took over a year. Triangular-shaped cups intended to capture precious aromas were nixed (turns out, a triangular canvas makes for terrible latte art). Handles were shaped and reshaped. The cup’s interior curvature, or slope, was meticulously calculated, with notNeutral printing one 3D prototype after another for Glanville and his team to test in Intelligentsia’s lab. There, they pulled shots and poured milk, videotaping the entire process so, like coaches watching tape, they could replay the footage in slow motion and catch flaws in play.

“Sometimes the latte art would break,” Glanville says. “The flow of the milk would go under and bubble up on the other side, breaking the pattern at the top.” The slope was corrected. More prototypes printed. More milk poured. More tape replayed.

Food Republic has the whole story which I found fascinating. These cups are only the beginning with more on the way, including these Gino cups, which are double-walled glass vessels which they released just last week.

Bobby Solomon

October 21, 2014 / By

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