Climate Change Could Mean Sour Grapes for Wine Drinkers

Vineyard

Quartz has an interesting article on the effects of climate change on the wine industry and some of the changes we’ll start seeing.

Traditional winemaking strongholds like Tuscany and South Africa will soon become too hot for grape-growing. In fact, by warping the flavors of the most popular varieties and driving production away from the Earth’s poles, climate change is threatening to remake the entire $30-billion global wine industry.

Does that mean a “grape-ocalypse” is upon us? No. But it does mean the wine you sip a decade or two from now will taste very different from today’s tipple—and will be a lot pricier, too.

We’re going to start seeing that by the mid-21st century that the optimal areas for growing grapes will move further and further north. The areas we currently know as “wine countries” will see a 70% decline. You’ll also start to see more Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Merlot being made because they handle heat better. Worst of all, the price of wines will get higher and higher, making your bottle of two buck chuck all but extinct.

Bobby Solomon

August 4, 2014 / By

Mr. Pineapple: The Perfect Beer For Summer

Mr. Pineapple beer by SanTan Brewery

I’m an avid fan of finding unique beers, coming across flavors that you don’t normally get in the average super market aisle. I was browsing through Whole Goods last night and came across this hysterical beer called Mr. Pineapple. Brewed by Arizona based brewery SanTan, this wheat beer is flavored with pineapple which gives it a sort of tropical taste, perfect for the summer. What really caught my eye though was the packaging.

I told my partner Kyle that this feels like the Will Bryant of beers. It’s fun, it’s irreverent, and you’re totally ready to drink one as soon as you get your hands on it. Good luck getting your hands on a six pack.

Bobby Solomon

July 30, 2014 / By

I Am A Food Blog Gets Recipes Right With Stunning Photos and Spot-On Type

I Am A Food Blog

I Am A Food Blog

I find it rare to come across a good food site that doesn’t look like a stock blog template or is filled with nothing but hokey desert recipes (I have a savory palette).

That’s why it’s exciting to come across a site like I Am A Food Blog, the passion project of Stephanie Le. Her photos are spotless and with every recipe she creates what you could call a “logo” which makes each dish feel unique. Not sure how anyone could resist dishes like Sriracha Honey Lime Chicken, Bacon and Egg Grilled Cheese Breakfast Sandwich, or Mac and Cheese Pie!

You can pre-order her cookbook by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

July 29, 2014 / By

The Art of The Perfect Boiled Egg

There’s nothing simpler than boiling an egg, but perfecting it is a whole other story. Bon Appetit put together a handy guide to boiling an egg to the correct consistency, for say, a salad nicoise or a hearty shoyu ramen. It goes to show that attention to detail is important in not only design, but everything we do.

How To Boil An Egg - Photo by Danny Kim

Bobby Solomon

July 24, 2014 / By

Mary Wong, A Well-Designed Noodle Bar In Eastern Russia

Mary Wong Noodle Bar

When you think of the locations of fancy ramen bars, Eastern Russia may not be the first place you think of. That’s the location of Mary Wong, a noodle bar located in Rostov-on-Don that was designed by the team at Fork, a studio based in Moscow. They did an incredible job with the branding and the build out, opting to do stay away from the tropes of “Asian” design and instead focus on the materials to evoke a certain feeling.

Mary Wong Noodle Bar

I feel like the vibe of the space is contemporary with a touch of cyberpunk, thanks to all the concrete and neon. It doesn’t lean too far into the sci-fi aesthetic though thanks to the copious amounts of wood in the floors, stools, and main table. Overall it’s a really fun space that would be welcomed in any city.

Mary Wong Noodle Bar

Mary Wong Noodle Bar

Mary Wong Noodle Bar

Mary Wong Noodle Bar

Bobby Solomon

July 24, 2014 / By

A Food Art Project That Transforms Dough Into Colorful Bread Balloons

'Blow Dough' Transforms Bread Into Colorful Balloons

'Blow Dough' Transforms Bread Into Colorful Balloons

If I asked you to recreate the idea of bread, would you have any idea of what you’d try to create? If you asked Omer Polak, Michal Evyatar, and Erez Komorovsky, they’d tell you that they’d blow it up. Or at least that’s what they’ve done with their project Blow Dough which utilizes an industrial blower that bakes dough into bread balloons.

Each of the doughs is made with herbs as well juices like beet, carrot, and spinach, which gives each balloon a distinct color. What you can’t sense is that it also makes each room smell incredible, fully activating your sense of smell as well.

'Blow Dough' Transforms Dough Into Colorful Bread Balloons

Their process in making the dough is rather interesting as well.

The process included many experiments in the workshops kitchen. It was a great challenge to succeed in creating dough that is very flexible and can also come thin for baking and the eating experience. We worked almost like scientists, we wrote time, quantities, and temperature that we could produce the exact dough.

I find this whole project to be so entertaining. It’s such a great intersection between art, food, and science. Projects like this make the old adage “Don’t play with your food” completely obsolete.

Read and see more about this project on designboom.

Bobby Solomon

July 22, 2014 / By

Eszter Laki Brings A Refined Design Identity to the Terminal Restaurant & Bar in Budapest

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

I love a good re-use project and the Terminal Restaurant & Bar is a prime example. Designed by István Nyir and built in 1949, The Mávaut Station was one of the largest and busiest bus stations in downtown Budapest. The simple, well-proportioned building was built for long-distance transport requirements with a spacious, bright waiting hall. Thankfully it was preserved as a monument in the 80s, and then in 2004 refurbished as the Design Terminal, the first design center of Budapest.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

The interiors design was conceived by the 81font architecture in a tight cooperation with the graphic identity. We were eager to preserve, recall and highlight the original features of the building. This attitude resulted in the emblematic logo, the minimalist copper clock which has served the building from the very beginning. This sign appears on the furnitures as well: the linoleum coatings wear the same clock as a copper marquetry. The iconic Hungarian Ikarus bus is a leading element in the graphic identity as well: the technical drawings of the famous vehicle are part of the menu card. We used a rubber stamp to indicate the subtle changes around the opening period and put a test drive caption (“Próbajárat”) on the paper cards.

The rich history of the space mixed with the subtle design elements is well-considered. The use of the copper clock as a mark was created by Eszter Laki, graphic designer on the project. The warm copper mixed with the whites and navy blues is an attractive, timeless combination. If you find yourself in Budapest be sure to stop by.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Bobby Solomon

July 21, 2014 / By

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