Eszter Laki Brings A Refined Design Identity to the Terminal Restaurant & Bar in Budapest

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

I love a good re-use project and the Terminal Restaurant & Bar is a prime example. Designed by István Nyir and built in 1949, The Mávaut Station was one of the largest and busiest bus stations in downtown Budapest. The simple, well-proportioned building was built for long-distance transport requirements with a spacious, bright waiting hall. Thankfully it was preserved as a monument in the 80s, and then in 2004 refurbished as the Design Terminal, the first design center of Budapest.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

The interiors design was conceived by the 81font architecture in a tight cooperation with the graphic identity. We were eager to preserve, recall and highlight the original features of the building. This attitude resulted in the emblematic logo, the minimalist copper clock which has served the building from the very beginning. This sign appears on the furnitures as well: the linoleum coatings wear the same clock as a copper marquetry. The iconic Hungarian Ikarus bus is a leading element in the graphic identity as well: the technical drawings of the famous vehicle are part of the menu card. We used a rubber stamp to indicate the subtle changes around the opening period and put a test drive caption (“Próbajárat”) on the paper cards.

The rich history of the space mixed with the subtle design elements is well-considered. The use of the copper clock as a mark was created by Eszter Laki, graphic designer on the project. The warm copper mixed with the whites and navy blues is an attractive, timeless combination. If you find yourself in Budapest be sure to stop by.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Bobby Solomon

July 21, 2014 / By

Fat & Furious Burger Elevates Hamburgers Into Works of Art

Fat & Furious Burger

It’s a matter of fact that my favorite meal is the hamburger. There’s something so perfect about the combination of beef, cheese, and produce all wrapped up in a pair of fresh buns. Thankfully the folks at Fat & Furious Burger feels the same way, turning hamburgers into these fantastic works of food art. I don’t think I’ve ever seen so many different kinds of burgers ever, and you’ve probably seen nothing quite like these. These burgers are themed around all sorts of pop culture topics like soccer, outer space, birthdays, James Bond, all sorts of crazy stuff.

A lot of the time they even include the ingredients to their burgers, like the Burger Blanc sur Fond Blanc below, which includes a chicken breast filet, roasted camembert, honey, white onions marinated in vinegar, endive, and mushrooms. It might be a little intimidating looking but I’d certainly be up for the challenge.

Fat & Furious Burger

Fat & Furious Burger

Bobby Solomon

July 17, 2014 / By

Turning To The Ocean For Our Next Big Food Source

Golden Kelp

As our climate starts to change so to must our eating habits. We’re currently faced with challenges like antibiotic resistance, drought, food insecurity, and obesity, so where can we turn? Funny enough, it’s the ocean, and this Scientific American article raises a lot of interesting ideas.

“I’m growing more food in 20 acres of ocean now than I was in 100 acres a few years ago,” he said. Oyster cages mark the sea floor, and curtains of kelp sprout along lines suspended by surface buoys. Mesh containers housing scallops, clams and mussels hang among the long kelp leaves. All of these species extract nutrients that leech into the water from land-based agricultural runoff (a significant contributor to ocean dead zones), and that’s central to Smith’s approach. His work with Greenwave is aimed at jump-starting a “blue-green” economy: identifying restorative species in any given ecosystem that make the oceans healthier, that are nutritious, delicious, and economically viable. This is an “elegant solution,” to some of the problems inherent in our current food system, Smith said.

The article focuses particularly on kelp which it dubs as the next “super-food”. What kind of foods do you make with kelp? There’s a surprising number of dishes though the most enticing for me personally is the kelp butter.

Kelp leaves cut into strips make a perfect al dente noodle; pickled kelp stems are crisp, flavorful and refreshing; kelp butter makes a unique but mild and rich spread; and a simple plate of kelp with a bit of sweet sesame dressing gives any fancy kale salad a run for its money.

Bobby Solomon

July 14, 2014 / By

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

When it comes to sharply designed branding and identity one of the first names that comes to mind is Brent Couchman and his San Francisco design studio Moniker. One of my recent favorite projects they completed was the branding and identity for Teddy’s Nacho Royale, a Mexican restaurant on the Menlo Park campus of Facebook.

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

I think what they’ve done is a perfect mix of playful type and symbols, all presented in a clean, contemporary fashion. They specifically “developed the visual identity, signage and interior graphics with a nod to local burrito joints, while incorporating their internal culture throughout the restaurant.” Overall it’s really well done, and a place personally I would love to frequent.

You can see more of Moniker’s work by clicking here.

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Teddy’s Nacho Royale Visual Identity & Interiors by Moniker

Bobby Solomon

July 2, 2014 / By

Ratio Eight Coffee Maker: Bringing Refined Design To your Morning Routine

Ratio Eight Coffee Maker

Coffee making instruments have a long history of being “sexy”. You’ve got the Chemex, the French press, and for the professional, the La Marzocco espresso machine. Added to the list is the brand new Ratio Eight coffee maker which, to use a totally clichéd descriptor, looks as if Apple designed a Mr. Coffee.

We designed the Eight with the ideal balance of form to function. The clear blown-glass and warm black walnut flush-up against machine-sculpted aluminum for a staunch juxtaposition. Every angle and alignment is measured down to the tenth of a millimeter, all for a singular, refined efficiency.

Ratio Eight Coffee Maker

I have no idea if this actually makes decent coffee or not but you’ve got to give it to them for styling along. The combination of aluminum, glass, wood, and cork is a designers wet dream. This is coffee porn taken to the extreme. You can take a look at the video below to get a sense of what the machine is capable of, but be warned, it comes with a hefty $480 price tag.

Bobby Solomon

April 28, 2014 / By

Snacks Quarterly: A Passionate Publication Dedicated To Snacking

Snacks Quarterly

Everyone has a weakness for snacks. I personally have a savory palette, preferring to nosh on things like wasabi cashews or walnuts and cranberries. Alexander Barrett and Brad Simon love snacks so much they decided to create Snacks Quarterly, an online publication that celebrates snacks in all their forms.

Snacks Quarterly is an internet publication that brings a variety of artists together to share their insights and ideas on the subject of snacks and snacking. Essays, illustrations, anecdotes, and practical snacking tips post four times a year on our beautifully designed, ad-free website.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 22, 2014 / By

‘Gastrotypographicalassemblage’ Finds A New Home at The Culinary Institute of America

Gastrotypographicalassemblage

Gastrotypographicalassemblage is a a massive 35 feet long by 8.5 feet high installation which combines two of my favorite things, typography and food. Created by Lou Dorfsman in 1966 (along with the help of designer Herb Lubalin) to grace the walls of the CBS building in Manhattan, the piece featured over 1,650 individual letters spelling out culinary terminology and expressions, as well as 65 food-related objects. Unfortunately the art was removed when the building was sold in 1989 though thankfully it was saved by designer Nick Fasciano and Dorfsman himself from remaining in the dumpster.

For the past 25 years though the work has been kept in storage, looking for a new place to reside. Thankfully The Culinary Institute of America has found it a home in it’s Hudson Valley campus. The video below tells he story of Gastrotypographicalassemblage and it’s recreation at the CIA. It’s great to see that such a wonderful piece like this didn’t get lost in the shuffle of time.

Bobby Solomon

April 14, 2014 / By

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