Eastern European Sushi: CLINIC 212 Combines Lithuanian and Japanese Food

Eastern European Sushi: CLINIC 212 Combines Lithuanian and Japanese Food

Eastern European Sushi: CLINIC 212 Combines Lithuanian and Japanese Food

Eastern European Sushi: CLINIC 212 Combines Lithuanian and Japanese Food

Lithuanian design agency CLINIC 212 has come up with a brilliant idea, Eastern European Sushi, combining traditional Lithuanian dishes and presenting it like Japanese sushi. The idea at first might seem a bit jarring, especially when you see an entire fin fin sitting on top of the smoked mackerel, but that’s entirely the fun of it. The presentation of these dishes entirely changes the context and the preconceived ideas of what you’d expect from these dishes. I think it’s also pretty great that all the liquids you see on the boards are actually dark beer or vodka… that’s definitely keeping it real.

Bobby Solomon

January 17, 2013 / By

Instagram Food Collages by Julie Lee

julie lee food collage

I discovered Julie Lee’s gorgeous food collages on Instagram. Vibrant, spare, and beautifully arranged, she shoots them after visits to various farmers markets in Los Angeles or before tackling a recipe. She often includes tips and tidbits to inspire her followers, too: “To keep your kitchen game tight, buy food that you aren’t familiar working with. Today, for me, it’s celeriac & pineapple guava.”

Aside from her collages, Lee seems to be adept at making tomato jam, ginger-molasses ketchup, and various forms of popcorn with toppings like pulverized miso seasoning powder and guava smoked sea salt. She also assembles quick bites and describes the ingredients so you can recreate them at home. Her Instagram account seems to be her most active blog. Thus, here’s hoping we see more how-tos or step-by-step photos on how to make potato mole chilaquiles. Follow her @julieskitchen.

Julie Lee food collage duo

Andi Teran

January 17, 2013 / By

2013 Recipe Wall Calendar from Liz Carver Design

2013 Recipe Wall Calendar from Liz Carver Design

2013 Recipe Wall Calendar from Liz Carver Design

I sometimes feel like calendars are slowly going more and more digital but then I see gems like the one above and I start to change my mind. Created by Liz Carver Design, this calendar serves more than just the function of telling the date but also gives you a clever recipe to try out. The execution of the calendar is done extremely well, with beautiful photos and wonderful typography to really make it stand out.

Recipes include:
January—Pesto Pasta with Portobello Fries
February—Chocolate Creme Cookies
March—Homemade Granola
April—Mango Mojitos
May—Tyler’s Famous Salsa & Guacamole
June—Chinese Chicken Salad
July—Watermelon Salad
August—Grilled Pesto Pizza
September—Soft Ballpark Pretzels
October—Chicken Tortilla Soup
November—Cornbread Stuffing
December—Grandma’s Cranberry Dressing

You can grab a calendar for yourself by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

January 17, 2013 / By

Supple Steel and Limber Lumber: A Look At Restaurant Design

Topographic ceilings in restaurants

Topographic ceilings in restaurants

Topographic ceilings in restaurants

There seems to be more and more of these restaurant projects where the ceiling becomes an expansive, undulating surface. Maybe it has something to do with acoustics or maybe it has something to do with creating spatial variety, or maybe it has nothing to do with either and is just something a few restaurants have in common.

The three restaurants above are designed by Office dA, LMarchitects, and SO Architecture. They aren’t necessarily the best examples of this trend, but rather these are just three examples showing a variety of how these ceilings appear. So do these ceilings help acoustics? It depends on how they’re built, but it very well could, and this is nothing new.

Alvar Aalto used a similar strategy in the lecture hall of the Viipuri Library built nearly 80 years ago. So maybe these ceilings are better understood as ways to build variety into a space without building walls. In restaurants where tables can be endlessly configured and reconfigured to accommodate hungry folks, isn’t it better to keep walls out of the way?  Maybe these ceilings are trying to do both or maybe these are projects more interested in something else entirely, like fabrication.  Either way, eating under malleable surfaces may become more commonplace, or it may be another flash in the pan.

Alex Dent

January 16, 2013 / By

The Latest From Food Innovators Bompas & Parr

bompas and parr hawksmoor jelly

bompas and parr gas

If, like me, you’ve always wanted Willy Wonka to exist in real life, you’re in luck, he does. But he’s actually split into two gentlemen and prefers jelly substances over chocolate. Sam Bompas and Harry Parr are the modern day equivalent of the chocolate factory impresario, and since 2007, they’ve been turning the wildest of culinary dreams into whimsical reality as the duo Bompas & Parr. What began as a business constructing architectural gelatin sculptures (which we’ve raved about before), has since morphed into immersive wonderlands that defy imagination.

Teaming with big brands and singular artists alike, they’re always keen to challenge both the palate and the imagination. In the last year, they’ve created everything from a London landmark mini golf course made of gigantic cakes to a neon green, sugar-substitute river with working rowboats on the roof of Selfridges department store. For Mercedes Benz, they offered their take on the American drive thru complete with “Big Merc” burgers sandwiched between doughnuts and salmi-scented air fresheners designed to dangle from rear view mirrors.

bompas and parr donut burger

Bompas & Parr have also been working with artists to bring otherworldly visions to life. Their collaboration with Ryan Hopkinson involved the exploding of gelatin which, when photographed, resemble intergalactic jellyfish. But lest you think they starting to veer too far astray from Willy Wonka’s candy-based legacy, let me assure you that not only have they designed a chocolate waterfall, they constructed a chocolate climbing wall, too. And their latest endeavor, the cookbook Feasting, lets you bring their magic into your own home. Who wouldn’t want to sip a complex cocktail next to a towering cityscape of ambrosial delights?

bompas and parr feasting book

Andi Teran

January 16, 2013 / By

‘Taste the Future’ by LUMBRE

'Taste the Future' by LUMBRE

'Taste the Future' by LUMBRE

'Taste the Future' by LUMBRE

'Taste the Future' by LUMBRE

I keep coming across impressive motion graphic work from various studios in Argentina. Buenos Aires-based animation and design studio LUMBRE recently did this spot for Pause Fest, a celebration of digital creativity held in Melbourne, Australia. Given the loose theme of “Future”, LUMBRE created an imaginative rendition of what the future of food might look like. That is, if the future was inhabited by models eating some striped pills and going on a flavor trip full of culinary eye candy and eating each other’s whipped cream hairdos. The beginning of the spot also features an impressively detailed architectural imagining of industrialized food production before the flavor tripping begins. Check out some behind-the-scenes shots and more of LUMBRE’s work here.

Skip Hursh

January 16, 2013 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Michele Miller

Michele Miller wallpaper - iPhone, iPad, Desktop

Michele Miller

Leading up to our week of food themed posts, I started to think about who could create a really beautiful food based wallpaper. I wasn’t quite sure who to reach out to, until I started looking through the photos of Michael Graydon that I needed to ask my good friend Michele Miller. Michele is an Art Center grad who studied fine art and illustration and has an incredible talent for drawing, which in my opinion she doesn’t do enough of. She also has an intense love for oysters, just like myself, and in fact we make good oyster eating buddies because we like the opposite types of oysters: I prefer the creamy ones, she likes the briny, salty ones.

As for her wallpaper I think it’s stunning, it’s everything that’s perfect and beautiful about an oyster. Her wallpaper also made me remember how very… carnal oysters are. If Georgia O’Keefe would have made art around foods instead of flowers I think she absolutely would have chosen the oyster. I’m sure that not everyone appreciates oysters the way that Michele and I do, so this wallpaper is dedicated to those like us. Whether you like oysters naked, with lemon or with a bit of mignonette, this wallpaper is for you.

Be sure to check back every Wednesday for a new wallpaper.

Bobby Solomon

January 16, 2013 / By

Addicted to Packaging Illustrator Anna Rodighiero

rodighiero1

rodighiero2

rodighiero3

I’m a sucker for food packaging. Whether it’s a foreign foods market or the specialty section of the grocery store, I’m attracted to products with panache. Italian artist Anna Rodighiero is equally as afflicted it seems, though she takes her affinity a step further on Packaging Addicted, a blog devoted to illustrating package design. Asking readers to submit photos of their favorite foods or interesting packaging they’ve encountered on trips, Rodighiero then draws her own whimsical version of the products.

She’s tackled everything from Chinese cookies and Nutella to Thai curry paste and English jelly candies. Her addiction encompasses her professional work, too. Aside from creating a version of her resume as a pizza recipe, Rodigheiro has interpreted the work of Julia Child as well as given pickles a whole new identity.

pickle-family

Andi Teran

January 16, 2013 / By

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