LEGO Haunted House

LEGO Haunted House

LEGO Haunted House minifigs

LEGO Haunted House Interior

Aliens, pirates, vikings, castles, dinosaurs, even the wild west! Over the years, the folk at LEGO have brought kids (and grown-ups) to all manner of great places, yet for some reason they’ve never had a LEGO Haunted House. That is until now! Coming this September LEGO will release their first official Haunted House.

Home to Lord Vampyre and his bride, the three-story house is served by a monster butler and a zombie chef, as well as being haunted by two glow-in-the-dark ghosts! It’s a fantastic looking set and the designers have really done an excellent job with it. Retailing at a hefty $180 the set is still incredible and with a release date of early September, it means that you’re just in time to have the perfect accompaniment for your house at Halloween.

The LEGO Haunted House is released September 1st 2012

Philip Kennedy

June 19, 2012 / By

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

I know you guys love Legos, so I had to share this video created by Francisco Prieto, who’s created a 3D modeled version of the Lego Millenium Falcon. Taking over 3 years, Francisco created the video with 3DS Max and V-Ray, using 3,572,568 polygons and 670 hours of rendering time. To say this was a serious undertaking would be an understatement, clearly Francisco loves him some Legos and Star Wars. This is kind of magical to behold, especially the detailing that goes into the upper portions of the ship. I’ve also realized I would never want to try and build one of these for myself, I’d probably go nuts.

Bobby Solomon

February 23, 2012 / By

The Incredible Lego Houses of Mike Doyle

Mike Doyle Lego house

Mike Doyle Lego house

Mike Doyle Lego house

Last week I wrote about Lene Wille’s beautifully minimalist installation Metaphorical Horizons and since then I’ve had a number of Lego enthusiasts contacting me about work which they’ve made using the small plastic brick. One piece which really caught my attention was these incredibly detailed houses by Lego artist Mike Doyle. Mike’s sculptures are an incredible testament to both Lego, and his skill and patience. His largest and most recent construction Victorian on Mud Heap (above), uses nearly 130,000 pieces and took about 600 hours to complete.

With true dedication to the project Mike built these without using any foreign materials – there’s no wood, no glue, no paint in these – it’s just pure Lego. It’s a pretty amazing feat of design. Mike’s got a number of ‘making of’ shots on his blog which are worth checking out; I know my first reaction when seeing these were ‘no way, they can’t be real’ so it was wonderful to see some progress shots of them being made. Go check them out!

Philip Kennedy

December 13, 2011 / By

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

I have a less then subtle love for LEGO and recently it has been manifesting into a number of blog posts here on the site. What impresses most about the little plastic brick is the level of innovation that seems to come from it. As a material one would imagine that it must be quite limiting to work with, and yet people all around the world seem to be able to turn these little bricks into all manner of weird and wonderful creations.

Take Lene Wille‘s beautifully minimalist installation Metaphorical Horizons for example. Built back in 2005 as a graduate project, the installation is stark and sculptural and yet its use of material makes for something which is both fun and playful. Her aim was to create an installation which could work as both an object and as a space, and through her use of LEGO I think she creates something which is beautiful and restrained while also being inviting and playful.

Metaphorical Horizons was built at the World Trade Center in Amsterdam over a period of 6 weeks, the finished piece being built from 270,000 white LEGO bricks. More details and images from the project can be found online here.

Philip

Philip Kennedy

December 7, 2011 / By

Time Twister – Hans Andersson’s LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

I’ve a lot of love for LEGO, and so when I saw Swedish programmer Hans Andersson‘s Time Twister clock I just knew I’d have to share it. His creation is noisy, slow and indeed the epitome of chunkiness, and yet it’s a beautiful creation.

For me, the raw simplicity of Andersson’s design is really attractive and the way in which his creation goes about slowly-revealing each of it’s digits is almost hypnotic. When I watched the video above, showing his design in motion, I was shocked at how much anticipation and excitement I felt just simply watching the time being revealed.

Hans has also built some other amazing creation including two puzzle-solving robots which are pretty incredible. One can solve sudokus and an other one can solve a rubik’s cube. Both are well worth checking out.

Via Incredible Things

Philip

Philip Kennedy

November 22, 2011 / By

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